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Leasing a Stallion?

This is a discussion on Leasing a Stallion? within the Stallions and Broodmares forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        01-19-2014, 09:26 PM
      #21
    Started
    I think that while its different the OP has a plan and seems confident in their abilities to handle the stud. While unconventional perhaps by todays standards I don't see why it could not work out well for all parties involved.

    My only concern would be returning the stallion. We took in a pair of mares for the winter/to foal out as a favor to a friend. That was nearly 20 years ago and they have not left. Well, actually one died a number of years ago at 20 some odd years old, but she is buried in the back yard so she is still kinda here. The friend has also passed on, and was in a nursing home situation by the end of the first winter. When taking in horses (or other animals) for an older (or flaking) friends/neighbor I always think it prudent to plan for them to never leave and be pleasantly surprised when they do! That would be the only situation I think it would wise to plan for OP. If the owner is getting out of horses its possible that after the period of the lease he may not want the stallion back. In which case, you would have to have a plan for feeding not two but potentially five horses. That is still not something you can predict and I don't know if it would be enough to stop the breeding lease. Cross that bridge if and when you come to it.
    2BigReds, Yogiwick and annigrl like this.
         
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        01-19-2014, 10:07 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    My only issue is around here AI isn't as easy as it sounds. Our routine vaccination, blood pulling, general call vet is real close by. For things like teeth floating, palpation, and US our vets are a little bit further away and are more experienced with equines. But to get one of the equine vets out to track ovulation where it needs to be fairly spot on, would cost us thousands, and piled on if they didn't catch. It really isn't about the money, as I'm not planning to get rich breeding horses, but it is the efficiency. Even to bring our mares their for the day, it is a several hour drive.

    For this stud, pasture breeding is our only option. Here we have the facility to separate the three from everyone else. They will have their own fenced in paddock, pasture, a large shelter and an automatic water.

    The owner recently moved, so I am not sure what their new farm is like, but I would imagine they are putting up new fences. But they might string two lines of hot wire and it is good for them. I would imagine all the horses would have to run together, so that is throwing my mares with their herd. I see more danger there.

    Here, again, I have the facility to do this, and the experience. I hope what I am going to say won't be translated wrong, but this isn't your million dollar stud. He IS 100% worthy of being a stallion, but he isn't I'll Have Another or Secretariat. He is proven in what he produces, and his sound mind and body. From what I know, he isn't broke to ride or drive, and I know many people believe that a horse should have to show to be proven, but he produces winners, and for me that is better than a Secretariat who produces sub-par animals for his quality. He is pastured with other horses, not kept alone, he doesn't have his very own handler, nor a staff en garde. His owner is a good man, and I cannot foresee it being an issue. This stud has been leased out before, and neither parties had an issue.

    I am looking to have 'early' foals, so something around March/April would be ideal. I am going to keep an eye out for their heats, and if they stop coming in, get preg checked. If I can get both mares settled I don't have a problem keeping him, but could send him back. If I can't get my older mare to take,(although I don't think it will be an issue,) I will likely send him back so I don't have her getting bred and due to foal in the worst heat of the summer. My older mare always carries 12 months, and it is characteristic of the breed to do so, I can only figure my other mare would carry longer, too. So the stallion in question won't be around for a terribly long time.

    I don't think there are any laws regarding breeding around here. (Although I will look into it...) Horses aren't a huge part of the goings on in this area. *Most* breeders in this area hand breed, though. With one they have Clydesdales for show, so I understand that aspect. But others who have two unsocialized crazies for three mares and sell their foals at auctions.

    This stud is an American Bashkir Curly horse. Gorgeous guy, but I can't wait until I can get some good snapshots of him. His kids out of my mares will be ABCR registered, and eligible for several other registries. His lines in particular are pretty riddled with Appaloosas, and make some nice horses. Soft on the eyes, and have so much stamina and versatility. His color is only a bonus, really, as I wouldn't mind a nice chestnut. He's dunskin, or some sort of dun, and has a bit of a blanket/frosted hips. My filly out of him is a red dun, nice frosted hips and some chrome on her.

    I have lots of plans, and a demand for these foals, though I never count my chicks before they hatch. When I get a stallion of my own I want to get something young enough to break out and use. We do some driving and farm work with our horses, so I would love to work any stallion of mine out in the field. I like riding, too, but using a stud for that he won't have a consistent enough job.

    Thank you all; got me thinking of some more aspects of this whole deal to get checked out. I hope for all parties this works out well. I agree to have my own stallion would be better and less risky in a certain sense, and if I owned my own stud that I worked I wouldn't lease him out. But if I stood my stallion to others I'd have the facility to take on mares, the stud owner really isn't set up for that, nor do I think it was his intention.
    wakiya, 2BigReds and annigrl like this.
         
        01-19-2014, 10:12 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Gah, to anyone who will read my whole post; brownie points, and lots of them!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rookie    
    I think that while its different the OP has a plan and seems confident in their abilities to handle the stud. While unconventional perhaps by todays standards I don't see why it could not work out well for all parties involved.

    My only concern would be returning the stallion. We took in a pair of mares for the winter/to foal out as a favor to a friend. That was nearly 20 years ago and they have not left. Well, actually one died a number of years ago at 20 some odd years old, but she is buried in the back yard so she is still kinda here. The friend has also passed on, and was in a nursing home situation by the end of the first winter. When taking in horses (or other animals) for an older (or flaking) friends/neighbor I always think it prudent to plan for them to never leave and be pleasantly surprised when they do! That would be the only situation I think it would wise to plan for OP. If the owner is getting out of horses its possible that after the period of the lease he may not want the stallion back. In which case, you would have to have a plan for feeding not two but potentially five horses. That is still not something you can predict and I don't know if it would be enough to stop the breeding lease. Cross that bridge if and when you come to it.
    This is true. I have spoken to the stud owner about possibly purchasing this stallion before I decided on what I really was looking for. His owner wasn't keen on selling him, but was more than happy to lease him to me. Many people have wanted this stud before and offered to buy him. If I was in your situation that you described, and the stud was in every way bequeathed to me, I wouldn't have a problem keeping him for a few years or selling him if need be. But I'm not going to sell someone else's horse.
         
        01-19-2014, 10:19 PM
      #24
    Green Broke
    Another thing I want to mention. That I am sure you have thought of, but if not.. You may have experience handling stallions, but do you have experience handling strange stallions in a breeding herd situation? It sounds like he's super laid back, but I'd hate to have you go in the pasture to handle your mare(s) or even the stallion himself and have him snap. It's not like he's in a stall by himself with his attention focused on you. Just something to think of and make sure you're comfortable with.
    annigrl likes this.
         
        01-19-2014, 10:34 PM
      #25
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Yogiwick    
    Another thing I want to mention. That I am sure you have thought of, but if not.. You may have experience handling stallions, but do you have experience handling strange stallions in a breeding herd situation? It sounds like he's super laid back, but I'd hate to have you go in the pasture to handle your mare(s) or even the stallion himself and have him snap. It's not like he's in a stall by himself with his attention focused on you. Just something to think of and make sure you're comfortable with.
    I can honestly say I have never handled an adult stallion this situation. I have been told to catch the stallion before taking out a mare. The stud's owner never did this and hasn't had problems, but I do not want to take my chances. I do have a gelding who is herd leader, and is a horse you have to keep your eye out for. I don't say that to entirely compare this to a breeding stallion, but I have had him for six years and I could believe that if I was careless about it he would question my dominance. He is the herd leader like a stallion would be. Protects, moves the herd, and for the most part gets to things first, but the mares have a very tight pecking order. I certainly will make sure not to be careless. I trust my horses deeply, especially the ones I have had for years, but I never let my guard down. They will always still be horses, and a stallion with mares usually has a bit more horse to him.
         
        01-19-2014, 10:38 PM
      #26
    Green Broke
    Yes, strange stallion, new herd, strange place, new person, etc. Sounds risky. Honestly I would not be comfortable at all, but if you think you are go for it.

    It might not hurt to ask to work with him a little in his current setting, so you can at least get to know each other and you can become familiar with the "stallion and herd" mindset, because I can easily see it getting crazy with 2 new mares in heat in a strange place, even with the best stallion.
         
        01-19-2014, 11:09 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    And it can be taken into consideration that this stallion knows both of these mares. They have not been together for a year or two, but horses remember eachother.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Yogiwick likes this.
         
        01-19-2014, 11:13 PM
      #28
    Started
    Sounds like OP has thought alot about this & is prepared to take on caring for a stallion. If he has handled stallions & has no trouble with previous handling/reading horse behavior then I think this arrangement should work out for him. This stallion has been handled by several people & has been been in herd situations,doesn't sound like he is one of those that is a "handful". If the stallion has been brought up right ,which he sounds to be,I don't think OP will have trouble.
    2BigReds and Yogiwick like this.
         

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