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Look for in stallion?

This is a discussion on Look for in stallion? within the Stallions and Broodmares forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        08-03-2013, 09:50 PM
      #11
    Foal
    I look for a good quality temperament that is in line with the breed standard (I breed old Spanish stock. I wouldn't want a stallion that has the temperament of a QH as that is not the temperament that a old Spanish horse should have), excellent conformation that makes up for the faults of my mare's, nice movement, and classic old Spanish looks. I also want to make sure that height is a good size and breed accurate. The breed I have does not come in horses taller than 15HH and rarely has horses smaller than 14HH. I am aiming at producing stock that is 14.2HH - 15HH. Perfect size for most people to do dressage with one weekend and conquer Cougar Rock on the next. Not too big to chase a cow well on and not too small that a full grown man couldn't ride. Perfect size IMO.
         
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        08-04-2013, 12:06 AM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Aesthetic    
    Definitely a stunning stallion! I agree with you in this post!
    Thank you! Just remember to keep in mind YOUR goals for your future breeding. What your best choices are depend on that. Don't let anyone discourage you; they're not worth your time. I recommend finding mentor, either IRL or someone trustworthy online. We have some great professional people here. Follow people you admire. The ones with integrity, intellect, and professionalism will stand out. They can offer sound, unbiased advice.
         
        08-06-2013, 08:15 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Thanks guys (:
         
        08-09-2013, 04:24 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Sometimes you go with your gut. If you have the space and time you let them "grow up" a bit and make another decision. Then you let them mature under saddle and make another decision.

    I loved my old stallion - loved his build, loved the mind and conformation he put on his foals. But I gelded every colt he had except 1 - and that one I keep re-evaluating every year *lol* so far at 2 and started under saddle I havent had a reason to cut him yet. . . But he just "screamed" prospect from birth. No intention of breeding him until he is *at least* 5 yrs & has had a career of some sort to prove his worth.
    Druydess likes this.
         
        08-10-2013, 10:59 PM
      #15
    Trained
    I think a stallion must have a great conformation, good mind, versatility and the ability to pass these things on to his offspring.
    The only way to prove a stallion for breeding is to breed him.
    Look at his offspring, siblings, and sire and dam. That should give you a good idea of what he can do in the breeding shed.
    I look at his performance record last especially if it is in the show ring.
    Too often, politics and fads determine the winners not ability. Shalom
         
        08-11-2013, 12:42 AM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dbarabians    
    I think a stallion must have a great conformation, good mind, versatility and the ability to pass these things on to his offspring.
    The only way to prove a stallion for breeding is to breed him.
    Look at his offspring, siblings, and sire and dam. That should give you a good idea of what he can do in the breeding shed.
    I look at his performance record last especially if it is in the show ring.
    Too often, politics and fads determine the winners not ability. Shalom
    Exactly. I don't get why some people don't get this.
    I have seen people invest in a very nice stallion prospect, spend tons on shows, marketing, campaigning, which take a few years, then another few years of training under saddle, and then shows, where- by this time- if it's done right- the stallion is 5-7 years old, a small fortune has been invested in him- another year to see babies hit the ground, and then- he produces crap. Not a keeper in the bunch. All that time, money, effort, not to mention presupposing a future business reputation that by now, people have been watching- for nothing and now you have babies you can't give away. I have seen this. It does no one a bit of good, least of all the horse.

    Personally, I'm going to have proof positive before my hard earned money goes anywhere. Not to mention the politics that IS a major factor in the ring. I've talked with some of the TOP Arabian trainers and what the "winners" do to win would make you sick. None of "us" are likely to win "First" in the big leagues unless we sacrifice our horse and have our faces firmly ensconced in the right peoples' arse to neck level. No ribbon is worth it to me. There may be a few exceptions, but it's not the norm.

    In any case, Dream has proven what he can do, and all the shows in the world mean nothing next to the exquisite filly he gave me. SHE will be his best advertisement, and there'll be more of equal, or better caliber in the future.
         
        08-11-2013, 02:30 AM
      #17
    Trained
    As a growing colt, these are the things I would look for, in order to let him keep his bits entire:

    Does he have perfect health? No? Chop them.

    Is he as near to perfect an example of his breed type as possible? No? How major are his faults? If you can list more than two glaring faults with his conformation - chop them.

    Is his personality desirable? Bearing in mind that stallions should be just as well behaved as geldings or mares, if he has been given the best chance with quality training, and is still a douche - chop them.

    Is his pedigree worth continuing? He has 16 full brothers standing stud - chop him. His sire line tends to have foals that "take after the dam side" - chop him. His lines have a tendency towards nut jobs/weak backs/foals that don't sell - chop him.

    I would be constantly evaluating a colt as he grew, and constantly asking myself these questions over and over. If I had any hesitation, any second thought about his suitability, I would chop him. IMO, a stallion should be as close to perfect as possible, and anything less should be a gelding.
         
        08-11-2013, 08:26 AM
      #18
    Super Moderator
    First thing I will do when goings into breeding, is study the mare. I will want her to have proven that she is true to her breed, has good conformation and has proven to show that she has ability in whatever field she has worked in.

    Having decided on breeding her, I will then look for a stallion that has better conformation than the mare on her weaker side.
    He should have proven his breeding worthiness by having competed and won.

    Conformation passed my eye, I will want to see him trot up in hand to see how straight he moves. Temperament counts for a lot though, I have seen very good proven stallions be a bit mouthy or ansty early in the season. Some, also through mishandling can be downright nasty but, in the right hands and work, turn right around.
    If the horse has stood at stud for a few years I would want his prodigy to be winning.

    I would want to see some of his young stock to assess what he was throwing.
    When there are genetic problems as in some breeds, I would expect the stud to have checked for the genes and have the paperwork to prove he was clear.
    MsBHavin and TamarackLane like this.
         
        08-11-2013, 10:53 AM
      #19
    Green Broke
    I think a stallion should be the pristine example of the breed that he is representing, and a pleasure to be around. To me, that means no glaring vices, no glaring conformation flaws, and the ability to /do/ something, regardless of the discipline.
    MsBHavin and MGTS like this.
         
        08-12-2013, 05:11 AM
      #20
    Foal
    Conformation, health, temperament, usability, and intelligence are the foundation for a good stud. However, how he holds up under the rigors of training and performance absolutely HAVE to be considered when you are looking at the "big" picture. Do people pay money to look at a beautiful horse standing in his pasture? Do you end up in the Olympics because your horse is intelligent and has perfect conformation? Does your horse make it to be a national champion reiner solely because of his bloodline? It is the success of that horse's career that makes it a valuable commodity. Look at pedigree write ups. They focus on the success of the horses in the bloodline. Are they successful for standing in a stall or pasture, or are they successful at some form of competition?
    Posted via Mobile Device
    MsBHavin and TamarackLane like this.
         

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    desirable, geld, stallions, traits

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