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Stallion behaviour 'n' stuff

This is a discussion on Stallion behaviour 'n' stuff within the Stallions and Broodmares forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Subtle stallion dominance behavior

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    04-08-2013, 02:01 AM
  #61
Trained
I sense that the OP speaks english as a second language and her choice of words and meanings may differ from ours.
OP owning and handling a stallion is a great experience most of the time.
How that stallion is handled from birth is very important.
There are pictures of my stallion on a breeding thread. He had just attempted to roll over in his three sided shed and was cast. I had to step over him and get a rope underneath his neck. Grab him by his back legs and roll him the other way. His trust and kind nature ensured that I was safe.
We then took him out of his pen and he was not 20 ft from 2 mares that were in heat. He is standing there looking like a plow horse not some well bred arabian stallion with a willing harem close by.
Not all stallions are this way.
If the stallion you are considering has been handled with kindness and taught to respect humans he might be a good buy.
If however he is distrustful or continually test your abilities I for one would reconsider the purchase. Good luck. Shalom
     
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    04-08-2013, 01:15 PM
  #62
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand Percherons    
I think that this is the only reason to hold onto a stallion and not cut him if you do not plan on breeding him in the near future. Perhaps you are growing out some fillies you want to outcross with him once they are ready to be worked into a breeding program. I think the smaller breeds get into genetic Russian Roulette by only using and promoting the fad or popular line at the time. Genetic material is lost all the time and you end up with a terribly inbred breed. The stallion candidates must first be outstanding examples of the breed.
THIS.

It took me forever, in searching for my stallions to find one that did not contain the mightily popular and overused Main Ring names of today.
My youngest stallion (coming three) is out of two parents that are in their 20's, his oldest grandsire was born in 1967. These are the incredible lines I want to preserve. And thankfully, he is maturing into just the stallion to do that. I am SUPER excited to see what he produced.

I went to look for some Crabbet bred mares to start a pure Crabbet program, and I only found about three active breeder's NORTH AMERICA. I can't even state how unbelievably sad that is.
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    04-08-2013, 06:05 PM
  #63
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbarabians    
I sense that the OP speaks english as a second language and her choice of words and meanings may differ from ours.
OP owning and handling a stallion is a great experience most of the time.
How that stallion is handled from birth is very important.
There are pictures of my stallion on a breeding thread. He had just attempted to roll over in his three sided shed and was cast. I had to step over him and get a rope underneath his neck. Grab him by his back legs and roll him the other way. His trust and kind nature ensured that I was safe.
We then took him out of his pen and he was not 20 ft from 2 mares that were in heat. He is standing there looking like a plow horse not some well bred arabian stallion with a willing harem close by.
Not all stallions are this way.
If the stallion you are considering has been handled with kindness and taught to respect humans he might be a good buy.
If however he is distrustful or continually test your abilities I for one would reconsider the purchase. Good luck. Shalom
This is sound advice.

I think I would only consider a 3yr old stallion if I knew for certain he has always been handled well, and in a complimentary way to how I handle my boys... 3 can be a testy age (even for mares and geldings), they are coming into their own and starting to consider they might "need" to be a leader, at roughly the same time the testosterone in a stallion spikes a bit at 3 (or so I'm told) further enhancing that testy behavior. If he isn't already well mannered, it may be difficult to convince him to change at this point.
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    04-09-2013, 03:19 AM
  #64
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUnicorn    
This is sound advice.

I think I would only consider a 3yr old stallion if I knew for certain he has always been handled well, and in a complimentary way to how I handle my boys... 3 can be a testy age (even for mares and geldings), they are coming into their own and starting to consider they might "need" to be a leader, at roughly the same time the testosterone in a stallion spikes a bit at 3 (or so I'm told) further enhancing that testy behavior. If he isn't already well mannered, it may be difficult to convince him to change at this point.
Thanks for the great input.
At the moment, my friend went to visit the horse. He seems very friendly, nibbles a little bit, a bit insecure - clearly due to the lack of the right eye (well its there but he doesnt see) and overall a nice horse. He has not been handled perfectly but did not show any bad habits. He is still in the same pasture with the 2 mares, one who kicked his eye. He is repeatedly reminded by said mares that he is not the dominant figure there.
Apparently as soon as grass starts to grow he will be moved to some other pastures, god forbid, he gets hurt again....
At the moment I just want to go there and see him and then think what happens further.
     
    04-09-2013, 10:21 AM
  #65
Yearling
He may (or may not) change when he is removed from his mares... So be careful sonce you said he has not been handled perfectly. It is not uncommon for stallions to seem placid and gentle when things are " all right in their world" the problems crop up when stresses are added.

Curb the nibbling... It is a subtle cue of dominance. (Correcting the subtle cues is how you prevent a stallion from thinking bigger ones are needed). Some might disagree with me, but this is honestly what I have found after raising 5 stallions and a few more colts. (Especially watching them interact with each other)
     
    04-09-2013, 12:02 PM
  #66
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUnicorn    
He may (or may not) change when he is removed from his mares... So be careful sonce you said he has not been handled perfectly. It is not uncommon for stallions to seem placid and gentle when things are " all right in their world" the problems crop up when stresses are added.

Curb the nibbling... It is a subtle cue of dominance. (Correcting the subtle cues is how you prevent a stallion from thinking bigger ones are needed). Some might disagree with me, but this is honestly what I have found after raising 5 stallions and a few more colts. (Especially watching them interact with each other)
Of course we will get rid of all the bad habits, and work as much as needed to make him in the best horse. I want to save him, I really do, noone else was interested, just a meat buyer, makes me sad. Even with one eye, he can be a great horse - just takes more time and patience.

Some of the stallions I worked as a groom for had the habit of nibbling as well, got rid of it in a week. Towards me. One of them was very dominant, the trainer always smacked him on his face when he tried to nibble or bite, so was quite head shy. Didn't fix that, brushing his face was a nightmare, but later on he walked next to me like a puppy, not a macho stallion. Stopped bothering me when I was cleaning his box and overall was nice to work with after the first week. Others were easier from the start.
I did get once pushed out of the box door when I was closing it for another stallion, but then again he was grazing on a chain all day when mares in heat are on the fields nearby. Mares he had covered and would still cover. Plus I blame the person who called my name out that time. Caught him allright because he respects fences well. Other times he was very gentle and easy going, I could ride him in the small area we had for riding, when he was started just about 2 months before at the age of 6, and the mares could stand nearby and watch and he never tried to take me to them.

The gelding that would be his company is very gentle, doesnt seem to have a care in the world, lives with a grumpy herd right now, but he never has problems, and never seems to be bothered by them all either.

And OFC If the stallion comes to my home I will keep them in separate pastures with secure fencing in between whilst they get to know each other and then slowly try to get them together, and with my friend who is helping me with all this fuss we have discussed the possibilities, if they cannot live together and he is not needed or wanted for the breeding programs, We think its better to castrate than make him live on a smaller pasture next to the other horse.. better they can enjoy their lives as friends, not just acquaintances over the fence.
     
    04-09-2013, 12:57 PM
  #67
Yearling
I wish you all the best then!
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    04-09-2013, 02:04 PM
  #68
Yearling
TheLastUnicorn, Thank you very much. :)
     
    04-16-2013, 03:58 PM
  #69
Green Broke
I grew up on an Arabian breeding farm with the most docile stud known to man. As a child, my grandpa would put me in his stall and I would brush his legs and belly. In retrospect, it was foolish and I am lucky to have not been hurt.

As an adult, I worked at a Warmblood breeding facility with a charmer of a Hanoverian stud that never stepped out of line. I would take him out to hand graze daily. He was a saint.

I have handled and met a good half dozen stallions in my life and I have never had a single bad experience as they were all owned by experienced and educated owners.

I still never drop my guard. It's not bias. It's common sense.
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    04-16-2013, 04:33 PM
  #70
Yearling
The only animal I ever drop my guard with is my golden retriever... both other dogs, even my cats before, all horses, even around chickens and bunnies I never not pay attention... I am taking everything into account that is said here :)
     

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