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Stallion to Gelding

This is a discussion on Stallion to Gelding within the Stallions and Broodmares forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Gelding a breeding stallion

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    03-28-2013, 10:45 PM
  #21
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by palogal    
No kidding. If gelding or a shot is traumatic, a new vet is needed.
And sometimes it's just the horse no matter who is doing the shots...
     
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    03-28-2013, 10:53 PM
  #22
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by rookie    
The shot may or may not be traumatic. The stocks, twitch, shanks, metal halters, shouting, swearing, rearing, kicking and slapping/punching I see on a nearly daily basis for horses getting injections indicate its an unpleasant experience.
Some horses are no doubt difficult to handle, but swearing, hitting, or otherwise abusing an animal just makes things more difficult. It creates a danger for the animal and for the handlers. If a veterinarian handles an animal this way, they need training in livestock handling. The animal has to be restrained; he doesn't have to be mistreated. The horse may think that he is being mistreated when he is restrained, but swearing or hitting him is just behavior by someone that is unprofessional and can't control themselves, much less a horse.
     
    03-28-2013, 11:34 PM
  #23
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by NdAppy    
And sometimes it's just the horse no matter who is doing the shots...
Sometimes horses are just completes a$$hats because they don't like getting shots just like some people don't.

I was going to say a new trainer but....
     
    03-29-2013, 07:39 AM
  #24
Started
Its true sometimes when I horse rears and twists it head so it clobbers me like a fence post I swear. Most vets do tap the horses before injections to desensitize them and sometimes owners go ape nuts over you "hitting their horse". Contrary to what many owners believe your horse is not that special to your vet, particularly if it makes a job harder. When you are 12 horses deep into a 50 horse vaccine schedule you want them to behave. At the end of the day, if your horse has to be tranquilized for shots something is wrong in your horse or its training. Some goes for farrier work and show grooming/trimming.
     
    03-30-2013, 05:19 PM
  #25
Foal
I think it is quite likely that your little man is depressed - Klaus Ferdinand Hempfling is a specialist on horse behaviour and he is very critical about gelding for exactly that reason - they get wonderfully easy, but we do take a great deal of their spirit away from them by doing so. I once heard him say in an interview that the depression can be very severe when the stallion is a grown up, and that they need a lot of the right kind of 'love and affection' to get out of it again (I don't think that he means cuddling and fussing - probably more like being with them calmly, giving them a natural kind of attention in the sense of feeling what they need).
Good luck with him - I hope you will get him into his new life successfully, so that he will begin enjoying life again!
     
    03-30-2013, 05:27 PM
  #26
Foal
It is not neccesary to restrain a stallion physically if you go about it the right way and learn to reallyunderstand and communicate with them in their own language. It takes some effort from our side yes, but it gives a totally different perspective in terms of bonding with them and gaining their respect and affection (dont misintepret please - I do not talk about the ususal natural horsemanship where it is a predator/prey relation - I talk about using genuine body language to signalize and communicate in order to acquire a mutual respect and understanding!!!). The original way of the European Knights is for me the way to go about it, and they had absolutely no problem with their stallions - on the contrary. When a stallion truly bonds he is much more eager to please than any mare or gelding - then he will do anything for his master! But it takes a greater effort to gain and deserve his respect and that is where we human beings mostly fail. This video says it beautifully:
     
    03-30-2013, 07:15 PM
  #27
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by dknatura    
It is not neccesary to restrain a stallion physically if you go about it the right way and learn to reallyunderstand and communicate with them in their own language. It takes some effort from our side yes, but it gives a totally different perspective in terms of bonding with them and gaining their respect and affection (dont misintepret please - I do not talk about the ususal natural horsemanship where it is a predator/prey relation - I talk about using genuine body language to signalize and communicate in order to acquire a mutual respect and understanding!!!). The original way of the European Knights is for me the way to go about it, and they had absolutely no problem with their stallions - on the contrary. When a stallion truly bonds he is much more eager to please than any mare or gelding - then he will do anything for his master! But it takes a greater effort to gain and deserve his respect and that is where we human beings mostly fail. This video says it beautifully: Hempfling - Horse Mirror Me - Confidence, collection, balance and high expression at liberty - YouTube
This thread wasn't about whether or not to geld. If you are against gelding a non breeding stallion, you will find that the majority around here will disagree with you. Here is a thread with multiple posters with stallion experience listing the biggest reasons why gelding is better for the horse and owner: Not gelding a horse that you have no intention of breeding
horsecrazygirl likes this.
     

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