Tentatively considering a 2-3 year breeding plan - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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Tentatively considering a 2-3 year breeding plan

I've been considering starting to save up the money to breed for a future show horse in two or three years.

I want to show in the Walking Horse world and two of my three Walkers don't gait, but one of them does (double registered TWHBEA and RHBAA and is a good representation of the breed). I've been toying with the idea of breeding her in a few years. She's Midnight Mack K bred both top and bottom, so I'd like to cross her with a more 'this day and age' stallion instead of keeping to her 'older' bloodlines.

She's been used as a broodmare in her younger years and is completely kid-broke. She's proven herself in what I look for (kid-safe, a good, steady-minded trail horse, sane, sound and safe on the road, nice gaits and good conformation).

The only real faults I've been given as far as her conformation goes is her neck ties in a little low and she toes out on her fronts, but she's never passed that onto her foals. So, in a stallion, I'd definitely be looking for a nice head and neck and clean, straight legs. I also think I'd like a little more height (this mare is 14.3 hands tall) and more substance to the bone.

The only real 'negative factor' is her age. She's eighteen years old, but I have spoken with her breeder and he said that as long as I took the proper precautions with her (vet care, emergency vet funds, etc...), he see's no reason that she couldn't be bred in her early twenties. He used to, before he retired, breed his horses well into their twenties.

I believe that considering this on a two or three year plan is quite responsible, as I'm not rushing into anything here and I know exactly what I want in a future foal, so I can stallion shop for the next two or three years while saving up the money. Another reason for doing it on a three-year plan is so that I will have my truck mostly all paid off by then and won't have to worry about a truck payment. :) My main riding mare, Gypsie, should also be retired to just slow, short rides by then, so I'll have time to devote to raising another foal.

And, who knows, by the time two or three years roll around, I may very well decide to not breed and just buy a weanling or two year old to bring along... :)

Horseshoe Loop Farm: Home of Gypsie (22 y/o TWH mare), Dakota (10 y/o TWH gelding) & Codie (18 y/o Walkaloosa gelding)
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post #2 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 01:41 PM
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Do you have pictures of your mare?

Personally, I'd just go with something already on the ground (even if it's a couple of years out). You have some pretty specific requests, and breeding is such a huge gamble.
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post #3 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 02:05 PM Thread Starter
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I'm sorry, but I fail to see how searching for a stallion with a nice head and neck, clean legs, a little taller than 14.3 hands and a bit bigger built is getting into the 'highly specific' category. Not meaning to come off as iffy or anything, but that strikes me as an odd comment when many others who breed often search for many more qualities than just those, lol.

I have some pictures of my mare, but not any really great ones at the moment. She's being leased to a summer camp program right now and I go see her on my off days, but since she's being leased I haven't taken the time to go and clean her up really well and get good conformation pictures of her. I'll see if I can find some older pics from earlier this year...

Horseshoe Loop Farm: Home of Gypsie (22 y/o TWH mare), Dakota (10 y/o TWH gelding) & Codie (18 y/o Walkaloosa gelding)
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post #4 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 02:28 PM
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I would think that even in a perfectly healthy mare who is not a maiden, breeding her at 20-21 years old and having her go through the stress of foaling at 21,22, or even early 23 (depending on when she takes), is a big risk. She may not even be able to conceive. She hasn't foaled in years. If she had popped foals every year until now and you wanted to breed her at 19 for a foal at 20, maybe...but she hasn't. She is a pleasure horse. Just because a breeder who breeds horses for a living does it, doesn't mean it is a good idea. He has to make money. Do you really want to put your mare through that and possibly lose her for a foal that might possibly suit your needs?
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post #5 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 03:15 PM
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I guess I didn't make myself clear.

Your "requirements" for the foal, not for a stallion. You want to breed for a "show horse". That leaves a lot open to interpretation. What level would you be planning on showing? What is your own skill level? What would be your goals within the "Walking Horse World"? You can breed even the highest quality mare and stallion and not get something show quality. It's a huge gamble.

Plus, you'd be a solid three to four years away from the show ring, /after/ the two or three year "Breeding plan". Is that how long you want to wait?
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post #6 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 03:36 PM
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I agree. Buying something on the ground, especially during a time when there are just too many horses as is, is the better option. You can then search for the colt with the most potential instead of gambling with the possibility of getting a foal that isn't what you want.

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post #7 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 04:37 PM
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I agree with what has been said. If you want to guarantee a nice foal, go buy one
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post #8 of 22 Old 07-20-2014, 10:34 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku View Post
I would think that even in a perfectly healthy mare who is not a maiden, breeding her at 20-21 years old and having her go through the stress of foaling at 21,22, or even early 23 (depending on when she takes), is a big risk. She may not even be able to conceive. She hasn't foaled in years. If she had popped foals every year until now and you wanted to breed her at 19 for a foal at 20, maybe...but she hasn't. She is a pleasure horse. Just because a breeder who breeds horses for a living does it, doesn't mean it is a good idea. He has to make money. Do you really want to put your mare through that and possibly lose her for a foal that might possibly suit your needs?
No, I don't. Like I said in my original post, it's just an idea I've been playing with.

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Originally Posted by Zexious View Post
I guess I didn't make myself clear.

Your "requirements" for the foal, not for a stallion. You want to breed for a "show horse". That leaves a lot open to interpretation. What level would you be planning on showing? What is your own skill level? What would be your goals within the "Walking Horse World"? You can breed even the highest quality mare and stallion and not get something show quality. It's a huge gamble.

Plus, you'd be a solid three to four years away from the show ring, /after/ the two or three year "Breeding plan". Is that how long you want to wait?
Thanks for clearing up what you meant. :) I don't want to immediately jump in a do major shows. I want to start at a local level, like in the local saddle club and over the years work my way up to higher levels. Ideally, I just want to show locally, unless I fall in love with it and decide to go higher. My own skill level, I'm a trail rider at the moment, but I'm an advanced-intermediate rider. I don't mind waiting, as with our local saddle club I'd be able to show in the classes such as halter, in-hand, etc...

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Originally Posted by SorrelHorse View Post
I agree. Buying something on the ground, especially during a time when there are just too many horses as is, is the better option. You can then search for the colt with the most potential instead of gambling with the possibility of getting a foal that isn't what you want.
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Originally Posted by .Delete. View Post
I agree with what has been said. If you want to guarantee a nice foal, go buy one
I have thought of that option, as I would like to actually buy a horse for a change (instead of getting them given to me, etc...)... that way I could pick out what I wanted, etc... so buying is still an option, but I'm still not ruling out breeding for my own just yet. I have some years to think on it and sleep on it. :)

Horseshoe Loop Farm: Home of Gypsie (22 y/o TWH mare), Dakota (10 y/o TWH gelding) & Codie (18 y/o Walkaloosa gelding)
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post #9 of 22 Old 07-21-2014, 10:31 AM
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I also think I'd like a little more height (this mare is 14.3 hands tall) and more substance to the bone.

The only real 'negative factor' is her age. She's eighteen years old
She's older, hasn't foaled in years, you are looking for a taller heavier boned baby and waiting 2 or three more years puts her even older. I wouldn't chance it on a mare I loved and cared about. Even if you were ready to breed now I'd say go buy.
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post #10 of 22 Old 07-21-2014, 11:00 AM
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My mare was 15 when I bred her, and foaled this year at 16, and I was still worried. My bo's best brood mare is in foal with what is likely her last baby, she's 21, but looks 12, and she is under strict supervision and vet care.

In short, your mares age is a big factor. If you were breeding her now it would be a different story, but you are talking about years from now. For me it would be a no, just based on the age.

conformation. Toes out and neck tying in too low can be deal breakers in a show horse, and she has a good chance of passing them on. My bo bred 4 mares this year, and they all have stellar pedigrees, incredible conformation and great dispositions, as well as being proven under saddle and flashy movers. It was a big debate whether she would breed any of them at all, despite all they had going for them.

just being realistic, your mare(while she sounds like a lovely saddle horse) has less than ideal conformation, an ok pedigree, and her age makes breeding her a big risk. I would save the money you were thinking of using to breed her and go buy the foal you want. You can then pick the pedigree, color, gender and temperament, and you don't have to worry about the foal toeing out, or your mare suffering complications.
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