bareback? - Page 4
   

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bareback?

This is a discussion on bareback? within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        03-26-2010, 02:08 PM
      #31
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jetana    
    I respect your opinion, but you don't know me or my horse, nor our abilities, so please don't assume you do.

    If you truly need a saddle/bridle to keep your horse from getting rid of you, there's not much foundation training.
    No I don't know you nor your abilities but it is far less then mine. I know my strength , my years of experiece and my abilities so I know you are doing nothing to further your ability to work a horse.
    For every day you have been alive I have probably spent time on the horse, for every day.]
         
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        03-26-2010, 02:12 PM
      #32
    Foal
    Apologies for the off-topic comment, but RiosDad, you're quite the set-in-you-ways arguer. Good debate involves fresh ideas. Maybe what works for you, and what you like, doesn't work for others, and they think differently than yourself.
    I'm not going to be so ignorant as to bother getting into an argument with someone who I'll never meet that lives across the country. I hope you have a nice day :)
         
        03-26-2010, 03:34 PM
      #33
    Green Broke
    I'm not going to get into the whole saddle/bareback debate, but want to get back the OP. My only concern in my case, and I use to ride bareback, is how comfortable is it for the horse?

    I have very prominent (sp?) seat bones and feel that must be uncomfortable for my horse. Anyone out there feel this way, or have any suggestions. As far as a bareback pad goes, that doesn't really pad enough over any length of time imo. Maybe I'm just "deformed"!
         
        03-26-2010, 04:10 PM
      #34
    Banned
    Horse's training NEVER stands still. It is either learning or unlearning. To give a well trained horse to a novice is to have that horse deteriate in training.. Your suttle leg cues go out the window with bareback, your legs are moving all the time, clamping unclamping. To shift a leg slight back and touch ever so lightly is gone. To shift your weight forward is gone etc etc.
    An educated pair of hands only require the suttle shift of rein weight, the movement of a little finger. With a halter again that all goes out the winder.
    I make well above average horse and DAILY I am watching for signes of deteriation in everything the horse does and correct it before the horse looses the lightness.
    You can not accomplish any of this riding bareback with a halter.
    You are just kidding yourself.

    I grew up on a properous horse/cattle ranch and every morning I would go out with my twine string in my pocket, walk about 1/2 mile to the back pasture, catch my personal horse, put the twine string around his neck, walk him to a fence and crawl aboard and then round up the dairy cattle and drive them in. I know about riding bridleless, bareback or any way else.

    That was 50 years ago. I thought I knew it all too back then. I was your age.
    Put a good saddle on the horse, a bit and take lessons if you want to learn.
         
        03-26-2010, 04:41 PM
      #35
    Banned
    At the weight and work load most of you girls are at it will not hurt the horse. If you are on the heavy side and have perdominant butt bones, yes you are digging into the horses back and could soar the horse.
         
        03-26-2010, 06:11 PM
      #36
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RiosDad    
    At the weight and work load most of you girls are at it will not hurt the horse. If you are on the heavy side and have perdominant butt bones, yes you are digging into the horses back and could soar the horse.
    I don't know about that RiosDad. I've had some real feather weights sit on my lap (crowded into a truck to go someplace) and within a few minutes my legs were screaming from the pain of the butt bones poking in.

    Don't know if it is so much a weight issue or a "conformation" issue.
         
        03-27-2010, 01:13 AM
      #37
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RiosDad    
    ...and could soar the horse.
    Pegasus?

    (Sorry, but I just couldn't resist )
         
        03-28-2010, 07:16 PM
      #38
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Walkamile    
    I'm not going to get into the whole saddle/bareback debate, but want to get back the OP. My only concern in my case, and I use to ride bareback, is how comfortable is it for the horse?

    I have very prominent (sp?) seat bones and feel that must be uncomfortable for my horse. Anyone out there feel this way, or have any suggestions. As far as a bareback pad goes, that doesn't really pad enough over any length of time imo. Maybe I'm just "deformed"!
    that's kinda what I was thinking while reading all these post...

    The nice thing about [well fitted] saddles is that it distributes your weight.
    While I think it helps your balance to learn to ride bareback, I personally would not do it all the time.

    ...of course my horse rides like a pogo stick. So I CAN'T. =)
         
        03-28-2010, 08:49 PM
      #39
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Reiterin    

    ...of course my horse rides like a pogo stick. So I CAN'T. =)
    A horse with a real bouncy trot if you can relax them, get them to drop thier heads can develope a real nice trot.
    If they give you a choppy trot it is usually a horse that is too tense.
         
        03-28-2010, 08:55 PM
      #40
    Trained
    ^^ LOL, nice. (Reiterin)

    I think that RiosDad and the other's that are concerned about bareback riding negatively affecting your horse's learning do have a point. It takes a very well balanced and aware rider to effectively train a horse with JUST bareback riding. The fact is when you start riding or even when you are coming back off a long layoff you don't have the core/leg/seat strength or balance to effectively communicate with your horse.

    Which is why in my opinion it's VERY important (if you really want to effectively ride bareback) that you ride in a saddle regularly too. Really focus on fine tuning not only your aids, but on using your seat effectively, maintaining your balance without using your hands, and developing your leg control. Too often bareback riders rely on their hands and develop riding postures/habits that aren't good for progressing themselves or their horses.

    This is just my opinion of course, but I have seen extremely effective bareback riders and trainers. I used to be pretty **** good bareback and am slowly getting that back by really working on it. Very good trainers/riders can use bareback riding to fine tune their horse's and their own responses. But most of us aren't there.

    Of course, if you are just using bareback as a way to relax and connect with your horse or to occaisionally work on your seat "feel" it isn't such a big issue. But when bareback riding is the only tool you use your missing out on a lot of training for yourself and your horse.

    Sorry for the long winded reply but I've been thinking on this alot.

    Edit - Another good point RiosDad. When Soda's got his head jacked up to the sky and is tensed up his trot is terrible. I get him to relax and it's smooth as glass.
         

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