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Barn Sour for Trail Riding

This is a discussion on Barn Sour for Trail Riding within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Barn sour trail horse
  • Chris cox and barn sour

 
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    02-03-2009, 08:33 PM
  #11
Foal
Thanks for the advice Walkamile. Can you give me a really good explanation of a one rein stop? I think I know what you are talking about, but I want to make sure.

She is real good at dropping and spinning from her previous life as a team penner and reiner. Her owner passed about a year ago, and my friend has had her since, but does not trail ride. But my friend has known the mare since she was 2, so that is how I have all this information.

I think once the kinks get out, we can have a real good time.

Amy
     
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    02-03-2009, 09:25 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amymcree    
Thanks for the advice Walkamile. Can you give me a really good explanation of a one rein stop? I think I know what you are talking about, but I want to make sure.

She is real good at dropping and spinning from her previous life as a team penner and reiner. Her owner passed about a year ago, and my friend has had her since, but does not trail ride. But my friend has known the mare since she was 2, so that is how I have all this information.

I think once the kinks get out, we can have a real good time.

Amy
It also goes by the names, yielding to the bit and disengaging of the hips.
What I did was at a stand still get the horse to laterally give to the bit first. Take the rein (let's say right rein) and bring it to your thigh (you can also go to hip or pommel on the saddle) and hold until the horse puts slack in the rein. Immediately release the rein. Do the same to the other side. What you eventually want him to do is as soon as you pick up the rein and start to remove the slack, he will immediately bring his head to your knee or just in front of it. He will get extremely light where you will barely feel any resistance.

Now practice at a walk. What he will do is as he brings his head to your knee, he will also cross his right back leg over the left back leg and all forward motion is stopped. Once this is automatic with lots of practice, do it at a trot.

This has saved me with Walka many times. Once he went to bolt after something up a tree started to screech at us, and I immediately raised the rein to my leg and BAM he disengaged and stood there waiting for me to tell him what to do. It basically shuts down that flight side of the brain and allows them to think again. If he gets too fast at his walk and I feel he's going to speed up even more, I shut him down and it calms everything down for us.

Just remember, if you miss the opportunity just before a take off (bolt), don't pull the horse over, just ride it out and sit back and breath. But if you feel your horse may take off, shut him down. If you were wrong, so what, gave him and you both time to regroup.

Most Natural Horse trainers demonstrate this tech. If you get RFD TV, watch one (Clint Anderson, Chris Cox , Dennis Reis), they'll explain it so much better than I can.

Good Luck!
     
    02-04-2009, 12:35 AM
  #13
Foal
Thank you. This will give us something to work on at home. I am still trying to figure out all the buttons on this mare. She is extremely talented and sensitive and well trained. She really wants to work for me, now I just need to figure out how to talk to her.

I come from the hunter/jumper world. So just figuring out how to put on a western saddle was a learning curve.

Amy
     
    02-04-2009, 04:47 AM
  #14
Yearling
Wow, goodluck teaching him all that! I hope it all works out for you...
     
    02-04-2009, 09:43 AM
  #15
Yearling
Walkamile has given you some great advice. A coupe of things to try.

If my horse rushes back to the trailer, I go right past the trailer and do and do a mile or two in the other direction. You may have to go past home ( Barn, Trailer what ever the horse considers home) And keep her working. Pretty soon they learn they don't get to stop when they get home.

Make the work on the trail if they try to rush. If they walk home at the proper speed, Then they get a loose rein and a relaxed walk. If they rush. You need to be asking them to work. If you get off, start lounging them in a circle around you, Lots of direction changes, Do this all the way back as you walk. I watch a lady get frustrated with a horse on spring ride. Get off and she walked the whole 3 miles back to her trailer, And her horse made a 1000 circles around her with 2000 rollback and change directions as she walked. The lady walked a straight line home, The horse never took a straight the remainder of the distance. That horse was absolutely soaked with sweat from all the work it had to do vs a nice calm walk home. If you are comfortable in the saddle. Same story. When ever they speed up or get barn sour, put them to work. Circle right, circle left, dance around this tree and that tree, sidepass, back up. Get off the trail and make them deal with all the crap off the side of the nice trail, logs, rocks, bushes. When they are on the trail and nice, relax and let them enjoy. If they get barn sour again, put them back to work.

You say your mare is well trained. So it sounds like she is just being a horse and testing you and taking advantage of what you will let her get away with. Be the Alpha and tell her, you get to relax if you behave and you get to work if you get excited.
     
    02-04-2009, 10:07 AM
  #16
Foal
Thanks for all the encouragement and advice. Yes, I believe that was a test out there. And she didn't exactly get her way. I was on a tight time schedule and couldn't go out further. But it ended well and she got the idea that she had to walk nicely next to me.

I am going to go out today again. Although today I will have more time to work her in the arena before hand. And then use the trail as a reward after.

My friend also suggested that maybe I needed a little stronger bit for trail. I work her in a loose ring snaffle. She suggested a smooth snaffle with a curb. My mare has a sensitive mouth and I want to be respectful of that. But at the same time, if I need a little leverage, I would like it.

Western bits are a mystery to me. English I know. In fact I have a slew of them, but the western ones...

Amy
     
    02-04-2009, 10:17 AM
  #17
Green Broke
I'm not a big fan of switching bits because of a particular bad behavior. I believe it's usually a case of a bit (no pun intended) more training. However with that said, if you do change bits, do so in a safe area and work there until the horse understands the feel and is comfortable with it.

I have a few friends that use snaffle bits for arena work, and when trail riding switch to a different bit for the reason you mentioned above.
I respect their decision, they know their horse well, but this was done after a lot of training with the other bit.

I also have seen a horse with a harsher bit bolt and carry on just like one with a very mild bit, still comes down to preparing for those OMG moments.

As you know, there are no quick fixes when it comes to horse. Just a lot of practice and time with the horse.
     
    02-04-2009, 11:23 AM
  #18
Foal
She came with the smooth snaffle curb bit. But I switched to the loose ring, because my seat was still unbalanced and I didn't want to 'hang' on her mouth while I got stronger and more fit.

We will see how today goes. I'll still be using the loose ring. Lots to work on, but now I have a goal.

Amy
     
    02-08-2009, 11:53 AM
  #19
Foal
When I had a horse that was barn sour like that I tended to go on rides ponying the barn sour horse. I.e I'm riding an experienced trail horse and ponying the other one.

Just so she'd get a feel for things without having to worry about a person on her back etc.

Then again those were all Icelandic horses/ponies which are ponied a lot and live together in herds a lot of the time too, so they're used to being ponied and being in close contact with one another.
     

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