Endurance riding
   

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Endurance riding

This is a discussion on Endurance riding within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Endurance riding jumping
  • Do you jump in endurance riding

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    12-19-2011, 02:37 PM
  #1
Foal
Smile Endurance riding

Hello! I was wondering how I can get into endurance riding? I want to take it up for next year, but I don't think I'm quite ready yet, Sapphire doesn't have the fitness yet. I ride 1 - 2 hours a day on a weekday and normally all day on the weekend. I do jumping, and just lessons on a weekday, on weekends we do hacking and jumping. What is the lowest distance an endurance ride can be, and can anyone tell me a training routine for it?

Thanks x
     
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    12-19-2011, 03:11 PM
  #2
Weanling
Hello and welcome to the addicting world of endurance! The first place to start is the AERC website. They have a free online handbook with all the information you need to begin and a training schedule that you can modify. Each event is different but true endurance starts at 50 miles in 12 hours. Limited distance is 25 miles which is a good starting point. There are also novice rides that are 12.5 miles to help you get started. Look for regional clubs that may hold events as well. Competitive trail riding is a different event so when researching make sure you know what you are looking at.

The events are set up to take a max of 6 hours for LD which requires a 4-7 mph pace depending on terrain and the vet break time. Lots of long trots and uphill work. The number one problem I have read/seen/heard about is overriding your horse. I've only been to 2 events so I am not an expert. Have fun on the trails!
     
    12-19-2011, 03:46 PM
  #3
Trained
I first started racing at a ten mile distance. It took us about two hours of leisurely riding along. I never did anything else with my gelding but keep him in good arena-riding shape. We now normally do the 25 mile every now and then when we have a free weekend. We're going to make it an annual thing to enter a race in one of the July events at Lily Glen Equestrian Park.

I found my association by literally googling "Oregon Endurance Horse Rides" and clicked the first couple links I saw. Downloaded an entry form, showed up at the campsite and said "Let's roll." ;D
     
    12-19-2011, 04:24 PM
  #4
Started
I too am interested in this, though since my gelding and I can't do more than a few laps of the arena at more than a walk yet, I know we're quite a ways off. ;) Livestoride- does that handbook start with a section on pasture puffs?
     
    12-19-2011, 05:04 PM
  #5
Started
Biggest thing for conditioning is to start off slow. Lots of walking to begin and you want to build to a strong trot as that is usually the gait you will be in.

The biggest help was to remember to only add one thing at a time to training sessions for conditioning
Ex.
If working for an hour at a walk for a few weeks and ready to move to somethng new. Then keep the hour but add trotting within the hour.
Don't add trotting and more time. If you want to add more time don't add more work.. does that make sense :/

I will try to find you the link I used
     
    12-19-2011, 05:08 PM
  #6
Started
Here ya go
This is one link
Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Endurance Riding
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    12-19-2011, 05:36 PM
  #7
Started
Subbing. :)
     
    12-19-2011, 08:14 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphiresrider    
I ride 1 - 2 hours a day on a weekday and normally all day on the weekend. I do jumping, and just lessons on a weekday, on weekends we do hacking and jumping.

Your horse may already be fitter than you think, if you are actually moving around for most of the time you say you are riding! I have found most horses who are "normal riding" fit can make it thru an LD if they are ridden reasonably. You may not win the ride, but you should be able to finish it!

I second the link kait gave you, the OD is a wealth of information on how to get started. If you can find a mentor in your area, that would be even better.
kait18 likes this.
     
    12-19-2011, 08:37 PM
  #9
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by kait18    
biggest thing for conditioning is to start off slow. Lots of walking to begin and you want to build to a strong trot as that is usually the gait you will be in.

The biggest help was to remember to only add one thing at a time to training sessions for conditioning
Ex.
If working for an hour at a walk for a few weeks and ready to move to somethng new. Then keep the hour but add trotting within the hour.
Don't add trotting and more time. If you want to add more time don't add more work.. does that make sense :/

I will try to find you the link I used
That's good to know. If I understand then, for example, if we're riding for one hour at a walk 75% of the time and trot 25% right now, the best choice would be to up the trot percentage OR up the total time, but not both at once, right? How long would you wait between changes in the intensity?

It seems like it would be tough to make sure you're getting the 'same' workout in though, even over several days. Or is that just me? Sometimes we'll work on transitions, other days might be more on suppleness, others might be mostly 'picky' things like stopping straight and lateral work, and still others might be trotting on an actual circle rather than weird oblong shapes. Do most people have a more set routine? I ride my guy about an hour at a time six days a week.

Sorry OP, if this is too much hijacking, just tell me and I'll stop!
     
    12-19-2011, 09:01 PM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharpie    
It seems like it would be tough to make sure you're getting the 'same' workout in though, even over several days. Or is that just me? Sometimes we'll work on transitions, other days might be more on suppleness, others might be mostly 'picky' things like stopping straight and lateral work, and still others might be trotting on an actual circle rather than weird oblong shapes. Do most people have a more set routine? I ride my guy about an hour at a time six days a week.
I don't think it's about making the workout the exact same every time, but about knowing the intensity of the work.

For example, the day you work on transitions, are you doing mostly walk to trot or are you doing trot to canter or maybe some of everything? And on suppleness days, working at a walk for 10 min is very different than 10 min of cantering. Then you have what I think of as 'brain workouts' which may not be very taxing physically, but can be stressful mentally.

If you want to focus on fitness, then on a day you think of as 'easy' in terms of physical workload (a "brain day"), you can always add in a period of trot or canter work if its something you want to work on every day. Spend 20 min (or whatever time I takes) doing correct stops, then trot for 2 5-min intervals with walk lateral work in between.

I can talk to you about my training schedule, but I don't even have a ring, so won't be of much help that way. :)
     

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