Giving my horse water when its hot ? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 44 Old 09-02-2011, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by bubba13 View Post
But was it the water or the initial overheating that caused the colic?

Excellent question. I am afraid that there is no way to know for sure.
Getting the horse overheated was obviously a bad idea.

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post #22 of 44 Old 09-03-2011, 01:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Allison Finch View Post
Not giving water to a hot horse is an Old Wive's Tale, as is putting cold water ON a hot horse. You MUST offer water, not only to hydrate but to cool the horse's core down, very hard to do without offering water.

The kings of cooling horses down are eventers and endurance riders. Check out one of the methods we eventers might use...

Ice Horse XC Cross Country Cooling Horse System

We pack ice on jugular notches.
Okay, I stopped reading after this post, so I'm sorry if someone already asked/answered this!
So its not true that cold water on a hot (as in just worked/sweaty) horse can cause them to tie up?
Also, it's fine for a hot horse to drink as long as he doesn't drink too much? You learn something new every day I guess! I always believed those things to be true..
Is it bad for a hot horse (or maybe not necessarily hot, but not 100% cooled down) to eat hay or grain?
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post #23 of 44 Old 09-03-2011, 01:24 AM
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Nibbling on a bit of hay shouldn't cause a problem, but I would not feed any form of grain until the horse was thoroughly cooled out.

Giving them water won't cause them to tie up either. Tying-up (also called Azoturia) is caused by a number of things, but giving a hot horse cold water isn't among them.

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post #24 of 44 Old 09-03-2011, 03:09 AM
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Maybe I am babying my horse to much. However, when we are going on a six mile journey in 96 degree weather I feel a need to water and rest him.

I have had him come back to the barn with no breaks and his skin didn't look right. I assume it was from dehydration. I don't know how far it was. I think if you are asking a horse to work hard, then water shouldn't be on the back burner. Take care of those basic needs first and foremost.
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post #25 of 44 Old 09-03-2011, 09:25 AM
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[QUOTE=smrobs;1160790]Nibbling on a bit of hay shouldn't cause a problem, but I would not feed any form of grain until the horse was thoroughly cooled out.

Excellent point.

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post #26 of 44 Old 09-04-2011, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Countrylady1071 View Post
Okay, I stopped reading after this post, so I'm sorry if someone already asked/answered this!
So its not true that cold water on a hot (as in just worked/sweaty) horse can cause them to tie up?

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We don't do aggressive cooling and then let the horse just stand around. We cool, then walk, then cool some more, then walk. I would always recommend walking during the cooling process.
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post #27 of 44 Old 09-04-2011, 04:22 PM
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"Originally Posted by Countrylady1071
Okay, I stopped reading after this post, so I'm sorry if someone already asked/answered this!
So its not true that cold water on a hot (as in just worked/sweaty) horse can cause them to tie up?"

According to Dr. Stephanie J. Valberg, D.V.M., Ph.D., College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota:


"Tying up is not a single disease, but a collection of clinical signs..... Read article here "

Tying up is often due to a hereditary condition. It is often seen after vigorous exercise or in horses that are routinely exercised and then put up to rest. I can find no source that associates cold water after exercise to tying up. I have also not seen it in my own experience. If anyone can find a source of research relating the two, I would love to see it. But as of now, I don't think there is any relationship between the two.





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post #28 of 44 Old 09-04-2011, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Allison Finch View Post
We don't do aggressive cooling and then let the horse just stand around. We cool, then walk, then cool some more, then walk. I would always recommend walking during the cooling process.

Sounds like an excellent plan.

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post #29 of 44 Old 09-05-2011, 12:08 PM
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When I did endurance and CTR, We always encouraged our horses to Drink at every opportunity they came across. And we let them drink as much as they wanted.

Most P&R rest stops we put lots of hay and some grain in front of them. We usually feed Alfalfa at the rest stops because it packs more calories per lb than grass hay and contained more calcium which horses use to trigger muscle twitch.

Unlike a performance horse that must preform for a 6 second calf roping, a 16 second barrel run or a 2 minute cutting drill. Distance horses need to perform for 5-6-8 hours. Performance horses can compete in their short events using the energy stored in their muscles. Distance horses MUST refuel on the go. Meaning they need to be processing food in their gut all day. They can not store 8 hours of energy. They need to eat and drink consistently thru out the event.

I dare say that distance horse that will finish a 50 mile endruacne race in 5 hours or even the slower horses at 8 hours, will be hot and sweaty. As long as they are working, Let them drink what they want.
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post #30 of 44 Old 09-05-2011, 12:46 PM
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Yes, let them drink all they want.

It is only once a horse has become severely dehydrated (which should never be allowed to happen) that sudden rehydration can cause issues. If the horse is severely dehydrated, he still has to be rehydrated, but it should be done more carefully. He should get a balanced, isotonic electrolyte and carbohydrate rich drink. The dehydrated horse should be pulled out of an endurance race.

Gatoraide for you and him.

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