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Is it a good idea?

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  • Reviews iconoclast horse support boots trail riding

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    05-12-2013, 10:41 AM
  #11
Yearling
I got back into horses by doing NATRC competitive trail rides.
One of the rules is that the horse can NOT have any leg protection. They expect a good trail horse to be able to take care of his legs.
So I've saw many a weekend with 100 horses head out across Colorado or Utah terrain with no leg protection. And some how those horses all survived.

Two weeks ago I rode into Utah's Robbers Roost, ( you can see the other thread) About 20 folks along into some of the most remote country in the west. No trails, We just bushwacked it where we needed to go to cross the canyons and ridges. Again, Not one horse had any leg protection. And again everybody made a safe couple days of riding.

If you can't tell, My personal opinion is that is over kill for open riding, Maybe running barrels or cutting cows where you have lots of laterial movement, But not needed on the trail.



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    05-12-2013, 11:27 AM
  #12
Weanling
Do wild horses wear boots?

We ride lots of rocks and all over the country. Have never needed them.




     
    05-12-2013, 12:19 PM
  #13
Foal
Wild horses don't have the extra weight on their backs or shoes either..... Just a thought..,,
     
    05-12-2013, 02:18 PM
  #14
Green Broke
I have a CTR horse with almost a 1000 miles on her over some rough stuff. Mountains, rocks, rivers. Trotting down hills (not something ideal; but sometimes you gotta to keep time), cantering, quick turns... She doesn't have any leg problems. I once rode a horse with 8,000 CTR miles on her who was as sound as the day she was born. I don't think horses need boots for trails.

Also, during CTRs you're out for eight hours a day. Boots retain too much heat. They also gather mud, water, and briars. I'm anti boots on the trail. If your horse scars up his legs, it's either 1.) his conformation 2.) shoeing or trimming, 3.) fitness level. A good trail horse takes care of his legs.
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    05-12-2013, 03:05 PM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brighteyes    
I have a CTR horse with almost a 1000 miles on her over some rough stuff. Mountains, rocks, rivers. Trotting down hills (not something ideal; but sometimes you gotta to keep time), cantering, quick turns... She doesn't have any leg problems. I once rode a horse with 8,000 CTR miles on her who was as sound as the day she was born. I don't think horses need boots for trails.

Also, during CTRs you're out for eight hours a day. Boots retain too much heat. They also gather mud, water, and briars. I'm anti boots on the trail. If your horse scars up his legs, it's either 1.) his conformation 2.) shoeing or trimming, 3.) fitness level. A good trail horse takes care of his legs.
Good Points! :)
     
    05-15-2013, 12:28 PM
  #16
Foal
I once found a live yellow jacket between the wrap and the leg. Finally figured out why Sailor kept stomping!

My opinion is that using the horse will strengthen bone/muscle/tendon/ligament. And the more experience the horse gets in rugged terrain, the more he will be aware of his feet and legs and where to put them.
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    05-15-2013, 02:40 PM
  #17
Weanling
[QUOTE=traildancer;2521562]I once found a live yellow jacket between the wrap and the leg. Finally figured out why Sailor kept stomping!

My opinion is that using the horse will strengthen bone/muscle/tendon/ligament. And the more experience the horse gets in rugged terrain, the more he will be aware of his feet and legs and where to put them.[/QUOTE]

(bolding mine)

Agreed!

A lot of "show" or "arena" people tend to look down on trail riding/trail horses because they THINK it is just lollygagging down a nice little path in the woods. They think it's something horses might be able to do as a "second career" if their show career doesn't work out for them. . .if they're not physically sound enough for arena work.

I think a lot of those people would be surprised to learn just how important it is for trail horses to be aware of his own legs and feet. . .to know how to take care of himself. It's not like trotting over smooth wooden poles in an arena, or around cones or barrels, or jumping things that are designed to give way or fall if they're hit too hard.

The horse has to learn how to think his way through things, for his own self-preservation. He doesn't want to stumble or fall or hurt himself any more than you do. My little black horse is 15 years old this month and has been my trail horse since he was three, and it's been VERY rare that he's ever come back from a ride with scrapes, nicks, cuts, rubs, etc. on his legs. Most of those have been from thornbushes - I have my fair share of scars from those things, too. He's more likely to bang himself up playing stupid grabby-face games with his buddies out at pasture.

Maybe it's just because of the trails I ride, but I couldn't imagine stopping at every stream crossing just to remove leg wraps so they don't get bogged down with water, then stopping again on the other time to put them back on (the legs would be wet, anyway, so the wraps would still likely absorb some of that water anyway).
     
    05-15-2013, 03:28 PM
  #18
Started
Ridden 1000's of miles, never needed them, over rough, rocky terrain, through rivers, brush, mud, snow and downed logs.

One gelding that was built funny(short back, long legs) had a tendency to clip himself, we threw plastic bell boots on him.
     
    05-15-2013, 03:58 PM
  #19
Super Moderator
Depends on the ground conditions but when I do use them I prefer the Pegasus Airboots and I'm liking the Iconoclast boots as they give better suspensory support and protection to the sesamoid area and on steep stony trails that's where injuries often happen
I'm sure our horses would do fine without them but I can't see the point in risking an injury that could see them off work for weeks/months for the sake of buying some boots
Why do people bring up the wild horse thing? Feral horses on the UK moors are often limping around with damaged legs (and feet) They would get left behind the herd if they couldn't keep up and be easy pickings for predators, die of starvation or thirst. They aren't/weren't immune to injury plus they are more likely to pick their own routes at their own pace and without the weight of a rider & saddle to interfere with that
     
    05-15-2013, 04:09 PM
  #20
Trained
I never use leg protection. I ride in bush with lots of deadfall, unstable rocks, mud and water. Every horse I took in was new to trail riding; every one learned how to move his/her legs and place his/her feet in short order.

You know, it always amazes me how a horse can put their feet in just the right place even though they can't see them.
     

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