horse layed down during trail ride?
 
 

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horse layed down during trail ride?

This is a discussion on horse layed down during trail ride? within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Horse try to lay down while walking
  • What to do when your horse decides to lay down on the trail

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    10-24-2011, 07:23 PM
  #1
Yearling
Unhappy horse layed down during trail ride?

So the end of summer we took my paint horse that is 16.2hh and is 4 years old almost finished. We also took mine/moms paint horse that's 14.3hh and 3 year old he was really good for my mom and never acted up.

But my horse would stop and not go I kicked and whiped him everything I could think of after a while I had to get off and walk, we were at a place where the trails are sand and its nice to ride on. But he stopped and I couldnt get him to go so I got off and he went down, rolled and just layed there. Finaily he got up and shook off and stood there and acted like nothing happened. He still wouldnt walk no matter how hard I tryed and ended up walking it all.

because he wouldnt do anything, we have desided to send him a trainer in a few months. He's a great horse and I can ride bareback halter and lead or bridle but with any saddle he acts up!!!!!!!
     
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    10-24-2011, 07:29 PM
  #2
Banned
Has he had any kind of check up recently? I know some horses just feel like stopping for a self-decided break, but if it is out of character then I'd be worried. Has he been active in pasture?? Does he lay down and roll a lot on his own recently? I'd hate to think maybe colic. Subbing to see what others think.
     
    10-24-2011, 07:34 PM
  #3
Started
I work with a young horse that sometimes decides to lay down in water, no matter if it's only a few inches or a foot of water. It's something that's not unusual for her, so we don't worry too much about it. A friend of mine had her horse try to lay down with her once, turned out he had an itchy spot on his belly - after our ride she took him into dirt where he layed down again to scratch it.

Are you sure the saddle fits him? Maybe his acting up is from pain and his laying down was to get you off of him? I'm no expert or anything but I'm just curious about he situation and what others say!
     
    10-24-2011, 07:50 PM
  #4
Yearling
He did have a vet check and everything was OKAY, I have seen him lay down to sleep but so does my other paint, he loves to run adn stuff in the pasture and my paints will "fight" with each other. He's a good horse and this trail ride was mid augest.
     
    10-25-2011, 10:29 AM
  #5
Yearling
Young horses when they get sweaty have a tendency to want to lay down and roll. Especially when they cross sandy, dusty or powder snow areas. It is something I've had to teach many of my youngster. No rolling with a saddle.

It is amazing how fast they can drop and roll while you are traveling down the trail. But if you are watching you will see the signs. Head down, looking at the material under foot. They don't threaten to roll in hard or rocky places. It will always be insofter material.

Its a more frequent occurance in the winter. The horses are haired up and become sweaty quickly. Soft powder snow encourages them to drop and roll to rub off the sweat.

Try to catch it before they drop. When you sense they are looking for a place to roll. Start asking for some movement, Get their mind on you and off the discomfort of being sweaty. Ask them to side pass, disengage their hind end, dance around a sagebrush, Just some movement that they have to think about and focus on your request.

If they do drop. Get your feet out of the stirrups. And then work hard on getting themback on their feet. If you need to, stepoff and holler, pop them with the end of your mecante or lead rope. But get them up quick and don't let them enjoy being down. They will soon learn that there is no enjoyment in trying to roll with a saddle on.

Young horses also get tired. So I view the stopping as more a conditioning or maturity problem than a training problem.
Continue to ride and exercise, Over time they will develope the muscels and be willing to go farther. You may have to walk and lead them once or twice, but always keep trying to get back on and ride. Don't let them learn that you will quit when they stop. Also being herd bound will help motivate a young horse. If the other horses all leave, They often get a second wind and are more willing to follow the other horses back toward the trailer or barn.
     
    10-25-2011, 04:09 PM
  #6
Yearling
He showed no signs of going down at all, and we jsut go to the trail and rode for twenty minute and then he layed down, he was fine, not sweating. I brought my moms horse and they don't like each other but my other gelding (the top horse) needs supplements so he can go on trails again and not become stiff during a ride.
     
    10-25-2011, 04:31 PM
  #7
Trained
Sounds like a possible back problem. Get the Vet out.
     
    10-25-2011, 05:06 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Painted Horse    
Young horses when they get sweaty have a tendency to want to lay down and roll. Especially when they cross sandy, dusty or powder snow areas. It is something I've had to teach many of my youngster. No rolling with a saddle.

It is amazing how fast they can drop and roll while you are traveling down the trail. But if you are watching you will see the signs. Head down, looking at the material under foot. They don't threaten to roll in hard or rocky places. It will always be insofter material.

Its a more frequent occurance in the winter. The horses are haired up and become sweaty quickly. Soft powder snow encourages them to drop and roll to rub off the sweat.

Try to catch it before they drop. When you sense they are looking for a place to roll. Start asking for some movement, Get their mind on you and off the discomfort of being sweaty. Ask them to side pass, disengage their hind end, dance around a sagebrush, Just some movement that they have to think about and focus on your request.

If they do drop. Get your feet out of the stirrups. And then work hard on getting themback on their feet. If you need to, stepoff and holler, pop them with the end of your mecante or lead rope. But get them up quick and don't let them enjoy being down. They will soon learn that there is no enjoyment in trying to roll with a saddle on.

Young horses also get tired. So I view the stopping as more a conditioning or maturity problem than a training problem.
Continue to ride and exercise, Over time they will develope the muscels and be willing to go farther. You may have to walk and lead them once or twice, but always keep trying to get back on and ride. Don't let them learn that you will quit when they stop. Also being herd bound will help motivate a young horse. If the other horses all leave, They often get a second wind and are more willing to follow the other horses back toward the trailer or barn.
I agree with all this. Sounds like he's not as finished as you think.
smrobs likes this.
     
    10-25-2011, 06:54 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Painted Horse    
If they do drop. Get your feet out of the stirrups. And then work hard on getting themback on their feet. If you need to, stepoff and holler, pop them with the end of your mecante or lead rope. But get them up quick and don't let them enjoy being down. They will soon learn that there is no enjoyment in trying to roll with a saddle on.
I had to do this once with a 15 yr old Arabian. He put his head down in a sandy place and boom, he was down! I kicked my legs out of the stirrups, got off and sort of yelled at him and pulled the reins. No rise! Finally I had to kick him in the shoulder to get him up.
     
    10-25-2011, 10:12 PM
  #10
Yearling
I know he isnt finnished yet, the vet checked him out he's fine.
     

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gelding, paint, trail, trail riding

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