How do you stop "Jigging" out on the trail? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Trail Riding

How do you stop "Jigging" out on the trail?

This is a discussion on How do you stop "Jigging" out on the trail? within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • John o'leary horse
  • Stop jigging horse

Like Tree11Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-27-2012, 06:52 PM
  #11
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
Here is an excellent article I think makes a lot of sense. :)

THE JIG JOGGING HORSE* By John O'Leary
This article explains the philosophy that I have been working with myself. This horse is coming along so much better than the last one I had. She is just as hot as any horse, but she has learned that it is easier just to go along easy and not jig. I keep a totally loose rein unless I am needing to slow down or if I see trouble coming our way.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-28-2012, 12:19 AM
  #12
Yearling
My horse must be an exception, because he's not mellow at all but circles/ backing up works for him... He's a leader type too... Well, I can't help you any more, sorry... :( lol.
     
    07-28-2012, 11:37 AM
  #13
Weanling
I know that many of you are going to bombard me with disagreements but here goes anyway. I had a horse that NEVER got over it. I had him for 2 years and we tried everything! He loved anything inside an arena. He would be calm and focused and stand still forever waiting our turn for sorting or whatever, but in the big outside he jigged and lathered and sweated until I though he would have a heart attack. The more in the group the worse it got. Circles, backing, one reining. The list was endless, including professional help. But - I could ride about 200 ft in front of the group and he would calm some. Go figure. I finally sold him to a family with children. They work a ranch and he has JOBS to do instead of just relaxing on the trail. He's as happy as he could be now. So, I guess my point is that some horses are just cut out and better suited to different ways of life
clippityclop likes this.
     
    07-28-2012, 11:50 AM
  #14
Yearling
You and me both, Blue! One of my horses is the same way. In fact, I don't 'trail ride' with him because it is beyond his ability and we worked on his issues for almost two years!

I use him for distance riding and we ride alone. This horse is the smartest horse I own and is such a blast. He doesn't want to run, he just wants to jog about 8 mph and he can do it for hours. He is a master of vet checks (we get all A's) and paces himself perfectly - I don't have to mess with him at all.

If I DO ride him in a group, I don't even let him get started with jigging - we just go straight to the front - which works out fine, because he will lead everyone else across water/slopes/etc without hesitation.

But once I decided that he just wasn't the group trail riding type, life was instantly better.

It is different when I ride with other distance riders who go the same pace, he never jigs when we slow down and we take turns leading and he is a different horse. But the lazy trail ride with friends? - I just take another horse.
Blue likes this.
     
    07-28-2012, 03:26 PM
  #15
Trained
Some horses do have issues with slow rides or with other horses leading. That does present a challenge.
     
    07-29-2012, 01:04 AM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celeste    
Some horses do have issues with slow rides or with other horses leading. That does present a challenge.
Got that right, some of the worse rides I've ever had was when following a horse that my horse just absolutely hates.
     
    07-29-2012, 10:30 AM
  #17
Yearling
Yes and I'm no horsie psychologist, but it can be even MORE challenging to teach a horse to relinquish the lead on the trail when he's an alpha horse to the group. Sometimes the other horses will just balk/slow down and hesitate in the front because their leader is in the back. That's one of those situations where I hate to drag out the training too much because then you are messing with herd hierarchy - and horses know an alpha even if they aren't part of their own herd. But discipline and safety still need to be addressed, of course!
     
    07-29-2012, 10:56 AM
  #18
Weanling
Discipline and safety come first, absolutely. However, I also try to refrain from trying to make any horse something he's just not. Yes, if I ask him to move ahead and lead for awhile, such as teaching another horse to cross water, bridge, etc. then that's what I expect. And if I want him to hang back to take pictures, bring along children, whatever, then I expect that too. But there comes a time on every trail ride that I want my horse to enjoy and relax as well. And if that's fitting in where he's comfortable, then I try to fit that in to the time frame as well.

I hope that makes some sense.
soenjer55 and clippityclop like this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jigging On Trail ReiningTrainer Horse Training 3 01-06-2010 02:01 PM
Are trail rides "fun" or "work" for your horse? riccil0ve Horse Training 41 10-17-2009 07:28 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0