How old are your horse trailer tires? - Page 2
   

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How old are your horse trailer tires?

This is a discussion on How old are your horse trailer tires? within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • 12 year old trlr tires
  • Old cracked tires on trailer

 
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    11-08-2011, 08:26 PM
  #11
Trained
That is checking on the sidewalls, causes the tires to lose air or even a blow out. Storing your trailer in a garage will reduce this and moving the trailer regularly when idle. My trailer is brand new so the tires are new as well. I am very fortunate to have a insulated shop to park it for the winter.
     
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    11-09-2011, 10:00 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Gate Farm    
Informative and interesting!

I read that tires from southern areas of the U.S. Degrade faster (due to the heat?) at about 5 - 6 years, whereas tires from northern areas of the U.S. Were good for 10 years. Any more info on that?

I also heard somewhere that exposure to sunlight was a prime reason for degrading tires, so if you covered them when not in use it helped. Anyone hear anything more about that?
You answered your question in the second paragraph. It's mainly the sun that does in tires over time. Rubber will still age when out of the sunlight (garage, barn, etc) but at a much reduced rate.
     
    11-29-2011, 12:00 AM
  #13
Weanling
One of the worst things you can do to trailer (or any) tires is leave them sitting with low pressure for extended periods. Add some sunshine and it does get worse.

A friend bought a 3 year old travel trailer that had been sitting (inside) for two years on low tires. He filled 'em up and figured he was good to go. I towed it from Iowa to Idaho and back for an ATV ride (my truck could carry our ATVs in the back, his couldn't, so I drove). We lost three of the four tires on the trip. Fortuneately, I'd tossed in my trailer spare, just in case, so we had two spares. We needed both of them before we could get the first blowout fixed.

Last summer, coming home from a week of packing into the Gospel Hump my friend had a trailer tire blow. He said it was an older, but never used, tire. Go figure. It's age, NOT usage, that destroys them.

Tires are simply NOT that expensive! And certainly NOT worth the frustration of roadside issues! Wear is seldom the issue (although I did wear out a set of travel trailer tires); age is the issue. It just ain't worth the hassle!
     
    11-29-2011, 11:02 AM
  #14
Trained
Waresbear, You are fortunate to store it indoors. I stored my first trailer in a building about 7 miles away from where I kept them, but it was owned by my hay man, so we knew each other. My current trailer, steel, has been outside for a decade now. Last year it was looking rusty, so I bought 5 gallons of Rusoleum, and I painted ALL of the outside surfaces, including the many faces on my hay rack--AARRGGHHH!!! I didn't bother to tape anything off, even though I went from Midnight Blue (which I couldn't find pre-mixed) to Royal Blue, many shades lighter. It didn't matter. EVERYBODY thinks it looks great, now, and the water is beading off of it. I had enough extra paint to paint the corrogated metal overhang on one of my outbuildings and use the same shade on my new, steel back door that goes to my basement, and keeps me from tracking in "everything barn" into my kitchen!
(I went through a bunch of cheap brushes, bc you can't clean oil-based paint off of them and reuse.)
     
    11-30-2011, 07:20 PM
  #15
Started
Everyone if your tires are cracked or old CHANGE THEM!!!! Trust me you don't want a tire to blow wit a horse in the trailer at 40 mph. I had bought a old 35 year old boat and trailer and it is a 12 boat and about 100lbs. And we had to move some stuff and loaded this trailer with the boat in with a bow flex and other things and going 30 mph down a road with 35 year old tires with say 300 lbs of weigh on them a tire and it blew and pulling this trailer back to the house on a rim and tire is not fun or easy.
     
    11-30-2011, 08:12 PM
  #16
Trained
Glad to see this thread. Just today I was looking at my truck tires. They are 2006, not obvious signs of rot, plenty of tread. The truck was babied and housed in a garage before falling into my trailer hauling hands. While I do plan of replacing my trailer tires in the spring, I'm not so sure about the truck. It'll be sitting my garage all winter, so I might be able to eek out another season, no?
     
    11-30-2011, 09:04 PM
  #17
Trained
Yes, Corporal, rustoleum is a dang good paint. Before I was given the new trailer for Mother's Day (love you Daddy! LOL), I had an older stock trailer, '84, red. Was showing it's age, we redid the whole thing & spray painted it with rustoleum and sold it. First person that looked at it bought it because they said it looked new. By way, new tires were put on it before it was put up for sale.
     

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