Looking for a trail horse for a beginner - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Trail Riding

Looking for a trail horse for a beginner

This is a discussion on Looking for a trail horse for a beginner within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        09-17-2009, 07:25 PM
      #21
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ognend    
    I actually think (with all my beginner naivette) that being bucked off or reared on should not happen, ever. If it does, there better be a grizzly bear 20 feet away from me and my horse charging at us. Am I crazy in expecting this?
    Not at all...I have never been tossed (knock on wood) from any of our mares, even when the young ones were green broke and alone on the trail.

    As a matter of fact, if you buy from a well established breeder/ranch, you should expect that they will listen to your expectations (including price) and experience, watch you ride to gauge your skill, and only then suggest a set of horses to consider. You should also expect to be able to ride the horse in the ring, on the trail, with other horses, and alone before you buy, since horses can react/behave differently in those different environments. The ranch that we bought our mares from typically had anything from unbroken to seasoned show horses available.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        09-18-2009, 10:12 AM
      #22
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zab    
    Good luck :)

    What I wonder tho is why both your horses has bad habits..can it depend on your attitude anything you do that provoke it from them? If it is, it might not help changing horse untill you know what's causing it. Horses generally don't do things to just annoy the rider, their behaviour is always triggered by something.
    Perhaps it's just a very bad match and a different horse will work much better.. but it wouldn't hurt to analyse what might have caused the problem and why it's not solved despite all the trainers. Are they good with the trainers but get bad when you've had them a while? Because then there is something you do that the horses tries to escape from. Not trying to blame, just to help, it'd be sad to spend time, love and energy on new horses and have the same thing happen again.
    That's a great question. My horse has never been bad in the arena at the trainer's place. I rode him there and he rode him there and he was great for both of us. When I brought him home I rode him for a few days around the back yard and he is great under saddle. Very soft on the bit and gives to pressure very well. I then took him out literally 10 yards away (with my wife on her horse right behind us) and asked him to go through a small puddle. That's when the trouble began with the rearing and kicking. My point is that the trainer claims that the horse is great, quiet and trail ready. I counter that with saying that if the horse is really trained to be beginner ready, violent rearing, tugging away on the lead rope and kicking at the same time should not even be an option. If he acts like this a few steps outside of where he lives, what can I expect on a completely new trail with all those scary new things and scents and sounds?

    My point is that the horse looks quiet and great and you think, wow, the best horse ever - until he blows his lid and does dangerous stuff out of nowhere. Hell, at this point I would rather have an obviously nervous horse - at least I know I am no notice :). My trainer's solution was to advise me not to put him into situations where he will fail. I agree with that (even though I am a beginner) BUT that is while you are training, not after months of professional training have been done. At least that's my uneducated opinion. I mean, it's not like I am asking the horse to go under a bridge next to gunfire with a heavy truck driving buy and a dog running underneath my horse all at the same time!

    It is my (beginner) expectation that once the horse is deemed trail ready, there will be a lot of situations where he will be in a position to fail. This is where their training and attitude comes in play, no?
         
        09-18-2009, 12:48 PM
      #23
    Zab
    Yearling
    No, I agree that a horse behavng like that isn't a good beginer horse, and definetly not a good trailhorse. A good beginner horse will accept pretty much wrongs from the rider and still manage to figure out what it's supposed to do, or at least not get stressed out by not getting it. At least as long as the rider genuinly try to do what's right for both of them (and I believe horses sense very well if you care but can't, or if you just can't but don't care either way)
    And a trailhorse shouldn't react to a puddle in the first place.

    I just question why it's not helped with all that training :) Because, if you're handeling the situation right (not saying that you must do everything perfect as a beginner, the horse just might be too sensetive for your level too)it wouldn't go that far. And if the horse is helped by the trainers and work ok for a while after you got it, but then starts behaving badly again, there is definetly someting you need to learn for future experiences. And the trainers should be able to see what you make wrong and what annoys the horse if you ride for them.
    If the horse just won't get over the problems at all, I'd rather blame the trainers as they're hired to help the horse understand how to behave. Sending him to a trainer for starters when you know it's too much for you, is great. Especially if you take lessons from the trainer as well to make sure the horse gets the same signals :) I did that with Crow, I wasn't a beginner but he was my first horse and we have had some problems.. the choice was putting down/selling or try a trainer. And it did wonders for both of us :)
    Before that I had the trainer at home, and things worked well as long as she was there. When she wasn't, I put my weight wrong and my green horse got nervous and on it went.. So training the horse in this case helped us both since he got more accepting - but I had to learn to keep my balance and weight right to be able to keep my overly sensetive horse in a relaxed mood.

    To get back to your horse.. it sounds like what he really needs is lots of experience on the trails (not the arena since he knows that already), with a rider that knows how to get him past the scary things in a calm way and realize that they wern't that scary at all. But that is way too much to ask from a beginner, especially concidering just how bad the problem is. And if you sent him to trainers to fix that problem, they failed. (unless they and perhaps others around them can handle the horse fine on the trail but you're the only one who can't..then, again, you need to learn :)
         
        09-18-2009, 03:13 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zab    
    No, I agree that a horse behavng like that isn't a good beginer horse, and definetly not a good trailhorse. A good beginner horse will accept pretty much wrongs from the rider and still manage to figure out what it's supposed to do, or at least not get stressed out by not getting it. At least as long as the rider genuinly try to do what's right for both of them (and I believe horses sense very well if you care but can't, or if you just can't but don't care either way)
    And a trailhorse shouldn't react to a puddle in the first place.

    I just question why it's not helped with all that training :) Because, if you're handeling the situation right (not saying that you must do everything perfect as a beginner, the horse just might be too sensetive for your level too)it wouldn't go that far. And if the horse is helped by the trainers and work ok for a while after you got it, but then starts behaving badly again, there is definetly someting you need to learn for future experiences. And the trainers should be able to see what you make wrong and what annoys the horse if you ride for them.
    If the horse just won't get over the problems at all, I'd rather blame the trainers as they're hired to help the horse understand how to behave. Sending him to a trainer for starters when you know it's too much for you, is great. Especially if you take lessons from the trainer as well to make sure the horse gets the same signals :) I did that with Crow, I wasn't a beginner but he was my first horse and we have had some problems.. the choice was putting down/selling or try a trainer. And it did wonders for both of us :)
    Before that I had the trainer at home, and things worked well as long as she was there. When she wasn't, I put my weight wrong and my green horse got nervous and on it went.. So training the horse in this case helped us both since he got more accepting - but I had to learn to keep my balance and weight right to be able to keep my overly sensetive horse in a relaxed mood.

    To get back to your horse.. it sounds like what he really needs is lots of experience on the trails (not the arena since he knows that already), with a rider that knows how to get him past the scary things in a calm way and realize that they wern't that scary at all. But that is way too much to ask from a beginner, especially concidering just how bad the problem is. And if you sent him to trainers to fix that problem, they failed. (unless they and perhaps others around them can handle the horse fine on the trail but you're the only one who can't..then, again, you need to learn :)
    Instead of writing up the whole story - read what I have written up here - it will better explain where I am coming from:

    Corripio: Of horses, training and horse trainers

    Cheers!
         
        09-20-2009, 06:45 PM
      #25
    Zab
    Yearling
    I'm not trying to change your mind, only to explain what I meant. :)
    I agree with you, mostly.
         
        01-10-2012, 12:05 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Hi, Has anyone ever used Jennifer Brown at Painted Star Stables in Ft White FL for trail training? I'm looking for references. Thanks.
         
        01-10-2012, 12:36 PM
      #27
    Trained
    Hi Ognend,
    Check out these guys here in AR. Not too far and they have an EXCELLENT reputation.
    Horses for Sale
    They have a SUPER nice grey gelding named Honcho, I'd check him out!
    I LOVE checking out what they have for sale, not that I'm in the market... They produce a ton of really nice "kid broke" horses. Something I'd look for if I were you! I love a challenge, but these days I look for horses that are specifically trained for children or trail horses with 1,000's of miles. I'm no longer able to cowboy or train! You went the right route rescuing and trying to rehab, hopefully you are finding your current two good homes? Good Luck!
         
        01-10-2012, 12:43 PM
      #28
    Super Moderator
    Just btw guys, this thread is over 2 years old...

    Showclothes, you'll get more responses if you start your own thread. :)
         
        01-10-2012, 12:45 PM
      #29
    Foal
    Thanks Wallaby, I'm kinda new to forums. I realized my mistake and actually did start a new thread. Thanks.
         
        01-10-2012, 12:48 PM
      #30
    Trained
    HAHAHAHAAAA!!!! I didn't even look!
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Beginner.. kandice Horse Training 10 08-20-2009 12:15 PM
    Help a beginner out! PersonalAwe1084 English Riding 2 05-31-2009 06:57 PM
    Beginner Horse Owner Questions Peacefuldweller Natural Horsemanship 21 05-08-2009 12:21 PM
    wanted kid's beginner horse for ranch near Las Vegas N.M. Juniper Tack and Equipment Classifieds 2 08-19-2008 06:58 PM
    wanted kid's beginner horse for ranch near Las Vegas N.M. Juniper Horses for Sale 0 08-10-2008 08:02 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:47 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0