Shoes pulling off in mud
 
 

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Shoes pulling off in mud

This is a discussion on Shoes pulling off in mud within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Can mud pull horses shoes off
  • Will mud pull a horses shoes off?

 
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    12-28-2008, 09:48 PM
  #1
Foal
Shoes pulling off in mud

Hi Every One - I would like some advice please. It has been very rainy where I live and we have red thick clay. It will suck the shoes off the horse real quick. So trail riding has been real scarace lately. I have thought about getting easyboots - thinking that maybe they may stay on better than the horse shoe. Bad thinking or not? Thought about getting them all away around. Still have shoes.... and then the "easyboot over them. Not sure how easy it is to pull off an easy boot - or how irretating it would be for the mare.... if the dirt and mud would get between the boot and leg... hoof. Cause sores. Any one have any ideas?
Thanks1
     
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    12-28-2008, 09:54 PM
  #2
Trained
Ideally your horses shoes shouldnt pull off just because its walking through mud. Im not totally sure but I would have a look at the job your farrier is doing because it doesnt sound right to me.

I wouldnt use the easyboots over shoes either. Apart from wearing down your easy boots it would probably cause rubbing I would imagine. Is there any specific reason why your horse has shoes on? You could always go barefoot if he doesnt need shoes? However, in mud you would probably have some troubles with easyboots
     
    12-29-2008, 05:15 AM
  #3
Showing
Jazzy has it right. I think easy boots will cause more problems than they would solve. Even thick clay mud shouldn't pull off a horseshoe unless it was put on improperly. If you are only trail riding and not riding much on rocks or gravel, then I would try going barefoot. It would definitely solve your problem. Good luck and welcome to the forum. :)
     
    12-29-2008, 06:34 AM
  #4
Foal
Thanks for your replies - I would love to go bare foot - but it is rocky here as well. Believe it or not the mud can pull the shoes off. We have a couple of different farriers at the barn and it happens to "both" of their work. It's really frustrating.
     
    12-29-2008, 07:05 AM
  #5
Showing
Does your horse have good feet? If she does, then going barefoot wouldn't hurt her even on rocky ground. I assume you just do trail riding type stuff, nothing too strenuous (running, quick turns, etc.). Horses hooves can withstand more than we think. Try going barefoot and just give her some time to get used to it. Don't use her too hard and keep a close eye out for any sign of lameness. After a while, her feet will toughen up even more and she will be up for almost anything. You also might want to look around and try to find a farrier that specializes in barefoot hoof care so that she will stay trimmed correctly.
     
    12-29-2008, 09:01 AM
  #6
Started
If you go barefoot you can use the boots of your choice. I use Boa's currently and love them. If I am riding in soft ground I don't use them but on my backroad I often do as their hooves aren't accustomed to that surface.. I never intend to go back to shoes.

Edited because I forgot to add this. I understand the mud isn't pulling off the shoes but rather slowing the front hoof from getting out of the way of the hind and so they get stepped on and loosened/pulled off that way. Boots are not meant to be used with shoes.
     
    12-29-2008, 09:22 PM
  #7
Foal
That makes a lot of sense Appyt - that the mud is not pulling off the shoes! We do have a farrier at my barn that does the natural horse "shoeing". I am really considering trying it. Does anyone know how long it takes for the bare foot "shoe" to actually be built up enough that the horse gets comfort from it? I know that when my current farrier works on her that he trims her before he puts on the new shoe. So would he use the "trim" that he would noramally take off to start to the natural "shoe"?
     
    12-29-2008, 09:50 PM
  #8
Trained
Skyesrider -- I would highly recommend searching this site and the net for barefoot hoof care. You will glean a LOT of information to get you started. Then come back and we'll all do our best to fill in the fuzzy spots! A barefoot trim is different than the trim for putting on a shoe and it does take some time for the hoof to callous and spread and grow, but if done properly your horse will adapt quickly.
     
    12-29-2008, 10:09 PM
  #9
Started
>>That makes a lot of sense Appyt - that the mud is not pulling off the shoes! We do have a farrier at my barn that does the natural horse "shoeing". I am really considering trying it. Does anyone know how long it takes for the bare foot "shoe" to actually be built up enough that the horse gets comfort from it? I know that when my current farrier works on her that he trims her before he puts on the new shoe. So would he use the "trim" that he would noramally take off to start to the natural "shoe"?<<

I'm not sure what you mean by the above.. There is no barefoot "shoe". Perhaps you mean the sole callous. Check out this trimmers site(she is my trimmer, btw) to see what a good barefoot trim looks like.
     
    12-30-2008, 02:35 AM
  #10
Foal
Here in WA the mud does play a factor in losing shoes.It happens everywhere and w/ all kinds of farriers.Mine tend to lose theirs towards the later weeks of their shoe cycles.But that's just something we live w/, try to keep em out of the deep mud. I have to shoe due to where we ride, rough ground and my horse at least has tender feet.Summer time shoes are rare to be lost.
I envy those that don't shoe though. One less cost.
     

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