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Trail Riding Etiquette

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    02-26-2012, 07:27 PM
  #71
Trained
I would think that if someone shot a rifle bullet into your house, they weren't hunting birds.
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    02-26-2012, 08:06 PM
  #72
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood    
By diesel63: "now im in the usa were I have to ware bright colour so the hunters wont shot! Oh the great outdoors."

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How is this rude, ignorant, and bigoted?

I've lived and ridden in many places in the USA. Some places/states were heavy into hunting (as in guns, bang bang) areas, some very restricted hunting allowed, and some were heavy into fox hunting.
In places where riders have to contend with year around hunting, there is a very real danger of being shot... riding or not.

I'm not from PA, but I currently live here in a heavy hunting area and during the heaviest activity seasons my child cannot even play out side for fear of being killed. Every single year a child or person gets killed by a "stray" bullet.
I can't even recount the dealth tolls on the local livestock by the sober hunters, let alone the drunk ones.
Several years ago while I was on the driveway waiting for the bus to drop off my son from school, a hunter shot my house. He was too busy trying to get the bird he was aiming at and didn't even pay attention to the fact that my house was on the other side of the road. Yup, he missed the bird.
The track of the bullet missed me by about 25 to 30 feet.

During the various hunting seasons I cannot even walk to the mailbox without having to wear a bright orange hat and coat, let alone ride anywhere else on my OWN property. I really don't appreciate having to buy those items since I do not hunt animals in any way, however I like getting shot less.

Every year I also have to run off illegal hunters on the backside of my property. The same ones who are incredibly shoot happy and don't care that they are tresspassing and hunting in my pastures, next to my livestock and equines. They certainly don't stop to think about what they hit when the bullet misses the deer, quail, turkey...etc.

For some of us in the good "ol US of A, the threat from hunters is very real. Doesn't matter if we were born here or not.

Around here birds aren't hunted with bullets, but rather shotgun shot.

Your fear is unfounded.
     
    02-26-2012, 08:25 PM
  #73
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunslinger    
Around here birds aren't hunted with bullets, but rather shotgun shot.

Your fear is unfounded.
I don't live around where you do
Here is an exerpt from an article after yet another person in PA was shot by a stray bullet-
"According to the International Hunter Education Association, hunters accidentally shoot more than 1,000 people in the United States and Canada every year. Authorities in Pennsylvania worry that more bystanders will be injured by hunters' stray bullets as more homes are built near wooded areas where hunting is common.
"We have had several incidents of people reporting that their houses have gotten struck by stray bullets," said Sgt. Andre Stevens of the Pennsylvania State Police.
Need for a New Common-Sense Hunting Law
Pennsylvania game laws require hunters to remain 150 yards away from occupied homes and businesses when they use firearms. However, Burns' relatives say lawmakers should consider requiring greater distances because bullets can travel farther than 150 yards.
"They [authorities] are telling us that it [the bullet that wounded Burns] came from the orchard nearby and these guns are actually capable of going anywhere from 800 yards to 1,000 yards," Allie Dickinson, Burns' mother, said on "Good Morning America." "To me, that seems like a common-sense thing, that if a gun [gunshot] can travel a mile, then you need at least a mile safety distance between the hunter and a person that's just an innocent bystander like my daughter."

I don't have the death toll stats handy right now.

Yup, my fears are totally unfounded.
The bullet whole in the side of my house is a complete figment of my imagination.
Well mine and the State Police officer who investigated the incident.
     
    02-26-2012, 08:40 PM
  #74
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood    
I don't live around where you do
Here is an exerpt from an article after yet another person in PA was shot by a stray bullet-
"According to the International Hunter Education Association, hunters accidentally shoot more than 1,000 people in the United States and Canada every year. Authorities in Pennsylvania worry that more bystanders will be injured by hunters' stray bullets as more homes are built near wooded areas where hunting is common.
"We have had several incidents of people reporting that their houses have gotten struck by stray bullets," said Sgt. Andre Stevens of the Pennsylvania State Police.
Need for a New Common-Sense Hunting Law
Pennsylvania game laws require hunters to remain 150 yards away from occupied homes and businesses when they use firearms. However, Burns' relatives say lawmakers should consider requiring greater distances because bullets can travel farther than 150 yards.
"They [authorities] are telling us that it [the bullet that wounded Burns] came from the orchard nearby and these guns are actually capable of going anywhere from 800 yards to 1,000 yards," Allie Dickinson, Burns' mother, said on "Good Morning America." "To me, that seems like a common-sense thing, that if a gun [gunshot] can travel a mile, then you need at least a mile safety distance between the hunter and a person that's just an innocent bystander like my daughter."

I don't have the death toll stats handy right now.

Yup, my fears are totally unfounded.
The bullet whole in the side of my house is a complete figment of my imagination.
Well mine and the State Police officer who investigated the incident.
So, if you need a mile, then there would be almost no place east of the Mississippi where anyone could hunt.

A hunter has a responsibility to know his target and whats beyond. Who ever is responsible, if found, would be guilty of criminal negligence if I were on the jury.

You don't think someone shot at your house on purpose do you?
     
    02-26-2012, 08:44 PM
  #75
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood    
Again, my question though...
How was Diesel63's comment rude, ignorant, and bigoted?
Unless of course you don't wish to respond to a completely logical question.

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I don't much feel the need to explain myself to you. You are ignorant about hunting and cherry pick "data" to make your anti hunting point.

You had zero credibility on this issue now you have even less.
gunslinger likes this.
     
    02-26-2012, 09:13 PM
  #76
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by mildot    
I don't much feel the need to explain myself to you. You are ignorant about hunting and cherry pick "data" to make your anti hunting point.
You had zero credibility on this issue now you have even less.
Very wise of you to change your original response.

Again, I do not hunt. Therefore I am not as educated about hunting as someone who does, or someone who has passion about it.

However, I am not anti-hunting. I was never trying to make an anti hunting point. No where in any of my responses have I said people should not hunt or that it should be made illegal to hunt.
I have not once stated that I oppose hunting itself in any way.

My "cherry picking" was to show how many people are accidentally shot, or their homes are shot every year by hunters. Facts speak for themselves.

If I was trying to start an anti hunting rant, this is neither the appropriate place or thread for that.

I am against ignorance, arrogance, closed mindedness, and irresponsibility in all forms.
     
    02-26-2012, 09:28 PM
  #77
Trained
Generally if hunters follow the laws, they do not shoot people unless they shoot people who are where they are not supposed to be. Trespassers get shot accidentally because the hunter does not know they are there. My husband had a friend that accidentally shot a man. The man was trespassing. The friend took a shot at a deer; the man he shot was in full camouflage, between him and the deer he was trying to shoot. The incident caused the shooter severe psychological problems. He gave up hunting and now lives in Atlanta. He severely grieved the mistake. It was, however, not his mistake and not his fault. I do not trespass on private property during deer season.
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    02-26-2012, 09:29 PM
  #78
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunslinger    
So, if you need a mile, then there would be almost no place east of the Mississippi where anyone could hunt.

A hunter has a responsibility to know his target and whats beyond. Who ever is responsible, if found, would be guilty of criminal negligence if I were on the jury.

You don't think someone shot at your house on purpose do you?
The mile thing was a quote from an article. Not my personal words.
You hit the nail right on the head- A hunter has a responsibility to know his target and whats beyond. I am glad you seem to be a responsible hunter, however just because you are doesn't mean all hunters are.
Many hunters in MY area do not follow the law.

If my incident were an isolated one, then I might be inclined to think it was on purpose. Unfortunately my incident is a very common one in my area.
Neither myself nor the officer felt it was done with harmful intent.
The 6' 5" man actually sat on the ground bawling like a baby beacuse his wife was going to kill him for being so stupid. He had just bought that gun, even though his wife told him not to, and just couldn't wait to see how well it worked.
Ignorant and irresponsible.
I was lucky my house was the only thing damaged. Most of the people shot around here are shot during a specific season.
     
    02-28-2012, 10:39 AM
  #79
Foal
Quote:
Personally, I think that having Sunday as the only deemed "safe" day is not fair since hunters already get the other 6 as it is.

And people wanting to hike, bike, jog, horseback also have many months a year that hunters are not allowed to hunt. Why do people want to restrict the amount of time a hunter can spend in the woods or forest? I can see from several posts on here, that the horse riders want the forest and trails all to themselves. I can also see where some riders see nothing wrong with sharing our great lands. Just because I live in a place that is wide open and very few people compared to the eastern part of the country, does not mean that I do not come across the same situations as people on the east. I ride in the mountains as much as I can, and the trails are heavily used by hikers, joggers and mountain bikers as well. Even during hunting season the bikers and hikers are everywhere. Some of the routes they take are many, many miles. I can choose for myself either to accept them or not. I can choose to go further into a trailess area or choose to hunt where the trails also cut through heavily forested lands, and if I choose the latter, I also have made the choice to share the lands that belong to all of us.
There are a lot of people that are anti-gun and anti-hunting, and those people will say, assume, and do whatever they can to put the hunters or people with guns in a bad spot light.

No rules, regulations or laws, either state or federal is going to fix stupid, you just cannot fix stupid. Accidents do happen and some could perhaps have been avoided, but most of the time it is still an accident. I truly wish that people would quit generalizing hunters as being a bunch of drunk slobs out to kill anything that moves.
     
    02-28-2012, 10:59 AM
  #80
Foal
Another thing that really annoys me about people being stupid is during hunting season when I come across a biker or hiker, with his/her dog, not wearing bright colors. I have seen them wearing black, browns, greens and grays. I have spoken to them on occasion and most just did not think about it, others just don’t care and only have the anti-hunter agenda. They tell me I am a killer. These people are a disaster looking for a place to happen. I have also had bikers come screaming past me on a trail, giving no regard for me or my horse, even though the law states that horses have the right of way. Things happen, get over it and learn to deal with it.

So I think (in my best sarcastic voice) that bikers and hikers should not be allowed on the trails. Maybe they should make a regulation or a law that dictates to them what clothing they can and cannot wear.
     

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