Trail riding help
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Trail Riding

Trail riding help

This is a discussion on Trail riding help within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Horse is spinning when ask for canter

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-21-2011, 06:49 AM
  #1
Foal
Trail riding help

I have a horse that has always been trading riding in groups and as a result of that has separation anxiety. I have only had him for a year. I bought him with another horse and now he wont leave her. Also because he has only ever been trail riding he bucks when you try and canter him, or at least I think this is the reason. If anyone has any suggestions could they please comment thanx.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-21-2011, 06:59 AM
  #2
Green Broke
Your horse is not confident and has become buddy sour. This can be fixed. First question: How well of a rider are you? Next: Are you confident enough to fully go through retraining this horse?
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-21-2011, 07:14 AM
  #3
Foal
I am a novice rider so what am I meant to do?
     
    05-21-2011, 07:45 AM
  #4
Showing
Welcome to the forum.

As a novice rider you may not be equipped to retrain your horse properly. I would strongly suggest getting a trainer - at least in the beginning. As for bucking when asked for a canter, that has nothing to do with the fact that he was just used to trail ride. All my horses trail ride and we canter a good deal without bucking.

What it sounds like is you have a horse that has been allowed to get away with a lot and really needs a knowledgeable rider who knows how to anticipate and counter your horse's faults before they happen. To paraphrase a famous trainer, training is knowing what to do before what happens, happens.
     
    05-21-2011, 08:49 AM
  #5
Green Broke
I agree
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-21-2011, 11:36 AM
  #6
Weanling
This member posted this in another thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
We now train nothing but trail horses. We have tried many different ways of doing it and have settled on a way that has been very successful for us.

We never pony a horse and we never ride with another horse. Usually by 4 or 5 rides around the ranch (mostly the barn-yard, the horse knows how to go forward well and is guiding pretty good, will walk and jog nice circles and lope pretty decent ones in the open -- not in a round pen.

At that point they go out on the trail. We live 5 miles from a National Recreation Area with miles of trails on 10,000 acres of canyons, brush, rocks and creeks. We start out with two horses and go that way for about 1/2 mile until the trail splits up. Then we split up and ride different trails (that meet back up later).

If a horse gets confused or scared or silly, we just ride harder and faster and go off trail in the brush and rocks where a horse HAS TO do it right. There is no place for him to do it wrong. I have struggled through brush and briars and cedar trees and you know what???? Within an hour or two, the green horse is a whole lot smarter, a whole lot more responsive and a whole lot more broke.

We never 'baby' them. If we have cattle to go out and gather, a colt with 5 or 6 rides on him will do just fine. They learn to look where they are going. They learn to listen to their rider. They learn to be independent of other horses. They learn all of the right things and the stupid things just go away with no fight.

When a horse get silly or spooky on the trail, the very first thing we do is speed up. We get them busy. We give them a job. If they are going up and down steep rocky hills in a strong trot, the foolishness all disappears.

I never stop and pet a horse. That rewards stopping. I just keep him moving. A lot of people inadvertently encourage and reward all of the wrong things. While the rider thinks they are teaching the horse one thing, the horse is actually learning something very different.

We help a lot of other people with their trail horses. [We no longer take in outside horses for training.] The first thing we do with all of them is show them how a trail horse is supposed to ride. Most of them have never ridden a good trail horse. A good trail horse goes everywhere you point his head without an arguement. You ride him like you would drive a Jeep -- you just go.
But yes, I agree with iridehorses-if you are a novice, perhaps you should look for help from a trainer/someone experienced.
     
    05-22-2011, 01:40 AM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
What it sounds like is you have a horse that has been allowed to get away with a lot and really needs a knowledgeable rider who knows how to anticipate and counter your horse's faults before they happen. To paraphrase a famous trainer, training is knowing what to do before what happens, happens.
I agree and excellent quote.

If you can't get a trainer, look into methods presented by various "popular" trainers . . . I don't want to say "professional" because there are plenty of professionals that don't publish books or TV shows.
     
    05-22-2011, 02:00 AM
  #8
Super Moderator
Pintophile,
While I love that post about never babying the trail horses in training, I know that not every rider has the confidence to ask a horse that is acting silly to speed up. I know that I myself will not feel strong enough to canter out a horse that is spooking at stuff , like spinning or doing sudden stops. I just dont' have the backbone.
     
    05-22-2011, 08:39 AM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
pintophile,
While I love that post about never babying the trail horses in training, I know that not every rider has the confidence to ask a horse that is acting silly to speed up. I know that I myself will not feel strong enough to canter out a horse that is spooking at stuff , like spinning or doing sudden stops. I just dont' have the backbone.
And that's fine. I was just tossing that quote out here to give the OP an idea.

That's why I say, if she's inexperienced and lacks confidence, it really would be better for someone bolder and more knowledgable to get the problems worked out.
     
    05-22-2011, 07:24 PM
  #10
Yearling
I like the idea of that quote pintophile. (thanks cherie) that is something I wish I could do. My mare is a very good trail horse... to a point. But she can also be reactive. I think the biggest problem (with her.. well, and me) is just not getting out enough. But anyway.
Back to the OP
Like others have said, If you are not confident/experienced enough to retrain/work with your horse(s), it would be best to find a friend or trainer who can. It sounds like you probably have a really good horse. He just has a few kinks to work out.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trail Riding in NJ EquusPeace Trail Riding 0 10-30-2010 09:21 AM
Trail riding help Nick220 Horse Training 4 07-14-2010 11:19 PM
Trail Riding Horsegal16 Horse Training 19 01-11-2010 10:53 PM
Need help with trail riding? MTcowgirl Horse Training 8 11-15-2009 07:59 AM
Riding trail, what do I need? drewsylla Horse Tack and Equipment 11 09-18-2007 09:18 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0