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Trail Riding Solo - Advice/Help

This is a discussion on Trail Riding Solo - Advice/Help within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Advice riding solo at bar
  • Trail riding solo

 
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    09-07-2010, 11:10 PM
  #11
Yearling
I've ridden many hours solo. I also have friends who have ridden alone ALOT.

Everybody gets hurt at sometime if you play with horses long enough. The trick is to be prepared, so that if something happens you can get help or take care of yourself until help can arrive.

I'll give you a couple of stories, maybe you can learn a few things from them

I was ponying a young two year old gelding. I was riding a seasoned gelding. While stopped. I had tied the seasoned gelding up. The young horse was loose. Both horses were saddled. Teaching the young gelding to carry an empty saddle. The young horse came seeking a treat, or some attention. In doing so he stuck his neck under the neck of the older gelding. He caught the older gelding reins on his saddle horn. I jumped in quickly to try and untangle them. The older gelding feeling the pull on the reins, moved to try and release the pressure. The colt feeling the tug on the saddle horn, panic and jumped forward. He head butted me square int he chest, knocking me to the ground. I blew out all the ligiments and tendons in my wrist. I had to climb into the saddle, ride two hours ponying a young horse with a wrist that was in serious pain. I ended up in surgery, had a 4 pins and cast for 8 weeks. Lesson learned. 1. Let the horses break the reins, step back out of the way. 2. Carry some string or other materials to repair broken reins.

Story number 2 was a friend, He went out for afternoon ride in late February. It was a nice day, He planned for two hours in the afternoon sun. During the ride, his horse slipped in some mud and went down. He broke his pelvis and ruptured his bladder. He lay in the mud for 13 hours unable to get to his feet. His wife came home from work and finally noticed he wasn't home. She finally called the sheriff around 10pm, They searched several places that they knew he liked to ride. Around 2am, they found him. Around 4 am they got him airlifted to a hospital. He spent 6 months in recovery. Lessons Learned. Tell somebody where you are going and when they should expect you back. Carry appropriate clothing for the season. My friend lay int he mud in 16* temps in a single long sleeve shirt because he had no jacket or extra clothing with him. Where he was ridding, a cell phone didn't have service. But if you are in an area with service, Carry a cell phone on your person. Remember, he couldn't stand up, so a cell phone in a saddle bag was still out of reach.

Story #3. Another friend is a horse trainer. He spends 8 hours a day riding horses. Usually solo. He was out working a clients horse on the trails. The horse tripped and went down. It shattered his leg when the horse landed on it. He also had to get back on the horse and ride several miles back to his home. Lesson Learned. You need to practice mounting and dismounting with injuries. Sometimes you just have to cowboy up and find a way home. In mountainous territory, riding the horse may be easier than trying to walk through rough country. Can you mount your horse with one hand? Can you mount your horse with one leg?

Now any one of these accidents could have happened while riding with others or by yourself. But if they happen when you are alone, you must deal with the problem.

I always carry water, some granola bars, matches, a space blanket, depending on the season/location a rain jacket. If I get wet, I can start a fire. If I get stranded over night, I can roll up in the space blanket or I can use it for shelter from the wind or weather.

I really enjoy a day out ridding my horse, they learn to trust me instead of using the herd for security. Don't be afraid to get out and enjoy the experience. But be reasonible and plan for unexpected events.
     
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    09-08-2010, 12:16 AM
  #12
Yearling
Wow thanks for all the help guys! I am 19 I have spent a lot of time riding on these trails, but I am not planning on traking into the mountains alone this winter mostly just the closer trails, I also got a hold of the boarding stable nearby advertising trails and she said I could haul in and ride there so get my horse used to it closer to home.
     
    09-12-2010, 10:54 AM
  #13
Yearling
OK, I was jealous of all of you up in the NW part of the country with the beautiful forest trails, until I saw the links about dealing with cougars and bears LOL
Seriously, another idea for self-defense that I use in my house... instead of pepper spray, you can get a $5.00 can of hornet/wasp spray and aim for the eyes. The cans usually shoot a strong stream 10-15 feet. Have never had to use it, even on insects, but it sure is cheaper than pepper spray.
     
    09-12-2010, 11:26 AM
  #14
Weanling
OO I used to be the worst at solo trail riding. I'd go every morning with my retired barrel horse, jump on him bareback and ride him down the street to any trail I wanted, I was always listening to my ipod in one ear the other ear listening for big trucks. But still bareback trail alone on the street!! Lol ugh
     
    09-14-2010, 07:51 AM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by outnabout    
OK, I was jealous of all of you up in the NW part of the country with the beautiful forest trails, until I saw the links about dealing with cougars and bears LOL
Seriously, another idea for self-defense that I use in my house... instead of pepper spray, you can get a $5.00 can of hornet/wasp spray and aim for the eyes. The cans usually shoot a strong stream 10-15 feet. Have never had to use it, even on insects, but it sure is cheaper than pepper spray.
What a great idea!
     
    09-14-2010, 02:47 PM
  #16
Weanling
I live in King County, WA, and I trail ride alot around here. I've never had any problems with the wildlife or the people but it also depends on what trails your going on.

To the list I would add waterproof pants and a good raincoat, especially if you are riding when one minute its nice and the next its raining. If I think it might rain I just tie the pants and coat to my saddle to be safe. Its not fun to get a ways out on the trail and get stuck in the rain.
     
    09-15-2010, 12:16 AM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by outnabout    
OK, I was jealous of all of you up in the NW part of the country with the beautiful forest trails, until I saw the links about dealing with cougars and bears LOL
Seriously, another idea for self-defense that I use in my house... instead of pepper spray, you can get a $5.00 can of hornet/wasp spray and aim for the eyes. The cans usually shoot a strong stream 10-15 feet. Have never had to use it, even on insects, but it sure is cheaper than pepper spray.

Keep in mind, if you use this product on another person, even if they are attacking you and they are injured because of it - you can get yourself into trouble. Pepper spray won't blind a person (even though they feel like it) but if you start using other products not designed for self defense you could be walking a fine line. I only know this because of working with our Enforcement Officers.
     

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