What do you all do? - Page 2
   

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What do you all do?

This is a discussion on What do you all do? within the Trail Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        02-20-2010, 01:47 AM
      #11
    Foal
    If it's a new trail, just walk him nice and slow and play it safe.
         
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        02-20-2010, 07:53 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    When I first took JR out on the bigger trail rides he would jig, crow hop, pull on the reins, even do a small rear. At this time I didn't know enough about him to just let him go relaxed.Because he wasn't. So what I did was circles. Every time he would get jiggy in a circle he went I would do atleast 3 quick ones then ask him to walk off.If he didn't we circled again. After me getting dizzy a lot..He now is safe enough for anyone to ride. Now when he's fresh he's funny now he will literally trot in place on a loose rein and won't take off unitl you ask him... After that hold on...
         
        02-20-2010, 08:59 AM
      #13
    Showing
    I'm sorry to say that what I hear from most of these posts are riders that find a way to conform to their horses behavior rather then having a properly trained horse. In my opinion, allowing a horse, or rather, excusing a horse for acting improperly shows a lack of discipline for both rider and horse.

    I usually have a horse or two at the farm that come to me for conditioning or for a tuneup. Many times over excitement when first ridden is common and one of the first things that I fix. It is a sign of a horse that doesn't understand that once the saddle is on, he has to go to work and nonsense is not permitted. An advantage that I have over some is that my horses are on 24/7 turnout but even a horse that is stalled needs to know that sillyness is not permitted - sometimes a horse like that needs to be lunged a little before saddling but only for a few minuets, not 1/2 an hour. I don't lunge with a saddle if he is too fresh because I will not allow a horse to buck with a saddle. A saddle means all nonsense is over and it's time to work.

    When I first got Hollywood, about 4 or 5 months ago, he was that way when first saddled, jiggy and pulling the reins. That was the first thing I worked on. Due to weather and a back problem (mine not his) I wasn't able to ride for ~6 weeks. I saddled him up yesterday (no lunging) and mounted up. He rode off like he was just ridden the day before. No jigging, bucks, rearing, pulling on my reins, just a loose rein and off we went.

    In my training, that is the way a horse needs to be 100% of the time.
         
        02-20-2010, 10:51 AM
      #14
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iridehorses    
    I'm sorry to say that what I hear from most of these posts are riders that find a way to conform to their horses behavior rather then having a properly trained horse. In my opinion, allowing a horse, or rather, excusing a horse for acting improperly shows a lack of discipline for both rider and horse.

    I usually have a horse or two at the farm that come to me for conditioning or for a tuneup. Many times over excitement when first ridden is common and one of the first things that I fix. It is a sign of a horse that doesn't understand that once the saddle is on, he has to go to work and nonsense is not permitted. <snip>
    Good point, but just what methods do you use to fix this?

    For me, my horses are usually pretty good. Sometimes the greener one will give me some attitude and I have found that for her, doing "arena" type work for 5 minutes or so is a good reminder for her to listen up and never mind that nonsense. I would not go out on a group ride with a horse that is misbehaving, except with a friend or two that knows I may be training on the ride.
         
        02-20-2010, 02:38 PM
      #15
    Showing
    I really don't want to hijack the thread but if you posted the question about jigging on the trail or something similar, you will get quite a few responses - I know I would respond and we have a good number of other horseman (not just riders) who would contribute.
         
        02-20-2010, 05:42 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Isn't that what this thread is about? Albeit, she specified at the start of the ride -- but still on the trail, right? So, do tell your secrets Iride! :)
         
        02-20-2010, 09:07 PM
      #17
    Showing
    To begin with, I'll start a horse that wants to jig, alone. I don't want to interfere with any one else's ride. I'll lunge him before saddling just to take the edge off (after I'm comfortable with his progress, I stop lunging). Once he is saddled, I'll flex him in both directions then mount. Once I've mounted, I'll flex him several time in both directions from the saddle. I'll have him stand for several seconds but as he gets better at standing, I'll increase that time. If he starts to get anxious, we do circles and serpentines then stand. I keep that process up until he stands for a few moments, only then do we walk off.

    We will walk off several times and then return to our starting place. If he starts to jig or get anxious at any time it's back to circles then stand still. There is no set time as to how many times I need to do this and it's isn't surprising to have him all lathered up the first few times. Never will I pull on this face or jab him with my heels. Everything is done slowly and without anger. It is simply a pressure and release.

    Once I have him standing and walking off without jigging, I'll introduce another rider. The rider I'll have with me knows that this is going to be a training ride and we may not get 1/2 mile from the trailers. We do the same thing as before but the 2nd rider will stop when I stop.

    As his attitude improves the second rider (this may be several training trips latter) will ride a little further away and my horse is expected to follow but not get anxious to catch up. If the jigging starts, the second rider will stop and wait while we do some flexing and circles then we both move off, allowing me to slowly catch up. Again, this may take several trips to get it so that he does not get anxious when another horse gets ahead of him.

    The long and the short of it is that this process may take a few trips or 1/2 the summer. What I want is a horse that is disciplined and at ease with being anywhere in the group I ride with.

    There is no magic to this method and I'm sure everyone has heard it before but the reason that so many horses are a problem is because most riders want only to enjoy a trail ride and allow their horses to get away with things that shouldn't be allowed. I would rather spend a month or two fixing the problem so that the horse will be a pleasure to ride anytime I saddle him up.

    Time and patience.
         
        02-21-2010, 08:54 AM
      #18
    Foal
    I just sit tight and releax, I go very quiet with my hands also I soften them up in his mouth!I don't get to worked up about it! If I stay relaxed then He will relax soon enough! You kinda have to think what hed be thinking! I imagine they would just be saying" Oh let me go mum let me go play with my freinds" If you get all worked up over him being a little excited then he is just going to make a bigger deal of the situation then it really is because he feels your excitement and thinks Oh well it must be something big coming! I would just relax and laugh it all off! He should be calm soon enough when he realises theres nothing to get all excited about!:)xx
         
        02-21-2010, 08:50 PM
      #19
    Trained
    Well this thing morphed a little since I was last online. I do agree with iridehorses that time under saddle is supposed to be no nonsense time. That being said, it's easier with some horses than others. I'm lucky in that my horse calms down within the first 5 minutes or so, but until that point, it does bother me that he pulls that crap at all. As each new trail riding season comes, my experience level goes up and my confidence along with it, so I am quicker to correct anything he does I find inappropriate. While I find the first 5 minute thing seem to happen with a lot of horses, I won't go on trail rides with horses who continually act up on trails. It's just not safe for fair for other riders. Occasionally you just get one of those days where all the horses are spooking at everything that moves, but I agree there's no place for horses who are not suited for trail riding.
         

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