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What kind of Dog?

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    08-23-2012, 12:36 AM
  #21
Weanling
I have an boxer. While he doesn't get to go on trails with me, because I ride in public and he likes to play with the horses. He is great with the horse but chases their tail at an run. He goes everywhere he can with me. He never had proper training, but listens better than most dogs. He went to an car show that had over 2000 people the other day with me. He does shed little hair all the time.
     
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    08-23-2012, 12:40 AM
  #22
Green Broke
I have labs.. mine like to follow me everywhere.. but if they find something tasty on the ground.. they don't come for crap.. well 1 does.. the other doesnt.. and the other 2 are just puppies learning.. LABS DO SHED QUITE A BIT THOUGH! But are great family pets and trail companies!!
     
    08-23-2012, 03:46 AM
  #23
Weanling
I know it's been said, but I want to put in another vote for going to the pound/rescue and seeing what there is. Pretty much any breed, except the miniatures and the short/flat/pug-nosed breeds will be suitable (I wouldn't be sure about a boxer, for example), so it would be shame to miss out on a great dog because of some preconceived breed ideas.

If you chose an adolescent or a young adult dog from a rescue, you'd already have some idea of your allergy-resistance to it (because you can go an visit lots before making up your mind), plus it's likely that it would already have some basic training and they'll be able to tell you about it's energy levels and preferred activities. Nothing worse than getting a dog to be an active companion and finding out that you got the one couch-potato in the generation... (actually, there's plenty of things worse, but never mind...).

Plus, apart from the fact that mixes are awesome, they do tend to have fewer health problems than their pure-bred counterparts.
     
    08-23-2012, 04:24 AM
  #24
nyx
Weanling
What about a dalmation? Pretty sure they were bred to run along side horses and are very loyal and protective of their owners. I used to have one named scrible great dog :)
     
    08-23-2012, 02:49 PM
  #25
dee
Started
My little mutt, Tuffy, loves to go with us on trail rides. He's terrified of the horses, so he keeps his distance. He's also a big momma's boy, so he keeps me in sight. He doesn't bark. He's also not particularly friendly with strangers, so he doesn't wander off to visit.

Tuffy2.jpg

Tuffy is 1/2 Puggle, and 1/2 ???, and weighs about 35-40 pounds. In the above pic, he is one pooped pup. One long walk and a short trail ride, and he was ready for a nap!
     
    08-23-2012, 02:54 PM
  #26
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeke    
I have a shepherd/lab mix who is so loyal and ready to follow me anywhere, just like most labs to their owners. The mix of both breeds makes her so much of a pocket puppy with so much athleticism I bet she'd love to hike with me more. I'm with SR, I LOVE labs :) they shed a lot though, and I'm thinking you'd be just as allergic to that as a dog with longer hair?

Maybe a poodle, Airedale or schnauzer would work? All come in a variety of sizes are fairly smart and are bred to be outside movin around.

Pounds are a good place to start. I've known some great pound puppies!
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airedales are awesome but they tend to have a VERY strong hunting instinct, so they MUST have a very very good recall. They are also hypoallergenic =] I have had three and love them !
     
    08-23-2012, 04:25 PM
  #27
Foal
I have a Manchester Terrier and she is very loyal and protective, she always tries to get my horse to run with her, but he doesnt budge. I haven't brought her on trails though so I'm not sure how helpful I am to this thread.
     
    08-23-2012, 05:58 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyx    
What about a dalmation? Pretty sure they were bred to run along side horses and are very loyal and protective of their owners. I used to have one named scrible great dog :)
The other half used to work at a shelter, the number one breed turned in was dalmations. They are hard headed and are not the best listners which means they are not for everyone. Her mom owned one too, ended up having to take here to a professional trainer and even then she only kinda sorta listened to her.
     
    08-23-2012, 07:40 PM
  #29
Weanling
Boxers are my breed so you'd think I'd be biased but I've fond they have a hard time in the heat. Between their hideously bred hearts and their short noses, it's a gamble. One friend has one that literally faints. All heart, those dogs.

Glad you're off the Bloodhounds. Every one of them I've met has a coat like a lab or shepherd. If you have issues with those downy under coats you won't do well with BHs, either.

With appropriate training, Dobies are excellent all around companions - and NO ONE wants to 'pet the cuddly puppy', which can be a bonus.

Your Standard Poodle is an awesome dog but do be prepared for an $80 to $100 grooming bill every 8 weeks, depending on your region. And that's a lower priced quote I'm giving you.

All your terriers have the capacity to be, well... Terriers, lol. They seem to come with a 1% quota of F-U.

Taking a walk through the pound really can't hurt. My current trail buddy is a Shih Tzu/Yorkie, not a combo I would have thought good, but he just happens to have the right bits of each breed to be perfect. Another version of such breeding was on my grooming table today and all I could think is how Inappropriate she was, lol!

Whatever you pick, share pics! Good luck.
     
    08-23-2012, 07:47 PM
  #30
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by hemms    

Your Standard Poodle is an awesome dog but do be prepared for an $80 to $100 grooming bill every 8 weeks, depending on your region. And that's a lower priced quote I'm giving you.
Buy your own clippers and go to town on them. Don't worry if you screwup because it will grow out in a couple weeks anyway. That's what mom does for her two. Just be sure you buy quality clippers.
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