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Pleasure lope

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  • Equine lope beat count
  • Western pleasure loping

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    03-04-2012, 11:06 AM
  #21
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koolio    
This is how I understand the gaits as well. I am also working to train my horse in WP and am taking lessons on a trained WP lesson horse. I can get a really nice, slow collected canter out of my gelding, but when I ride the lesson horse at a lope, the gait feels entirely different. The trainer says the lesson horse "shuffles" a bit, but I am still confused as to when I am getting a true lope. Maybe someone could describe how they count the beat of each?

In the canter I count - da-da-dum, da-da-dum, da-da-dum... rhythmic and steady at medium, fast and slow (don't know if this sounds right or not)

Lope- ????
A true lope has 3 beats, just like a canter....but the beats are slower, as you have hang time in the air.
     
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    03-04-2012, 01:38 PM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotaDunQH    
A true lope has 3 beats, just like a canter....but the beats are slower, as you have hang time in the air.
OK Thanks!

So when a horse is "shuffling" at the lope, are they truly loping? When I am on the lesson horse at "the lope", it feels like more than a three beat rhythm, kind of like a half canter, half trot. It seems like I can feel that fourth foot hit the ground creating a 4 beat feel like du-du-dum-dum. The instructor says the horse is loping, but shuffling a bit. I am trying to understand what that means.
     
    03-05-2012, 06:16 PM
  #23
Weanling
They call that a trollope and it is not a lop/canter at all. They are trotting in the front and loping in the back with a little shoulder lift.
It was hard for me to learn the lope going from English to WP. I always looked for the hiccup. That is what I call it. When they are going so collected and slow there is this pause just before the front leg reaches out. Then it hits the ground and you get a little bump. Which if you speed it up it is the rocking chair of the canter. It just has this moment of hesitation. Hope that helps you see it a diffrent way.
     
    03-05-2012, 07:24 PM
  #24
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by raywonk    
They call that a trollope and it is not a lop/canter at all. They are trotting in the front and loping in the back with a little shoulder lift.
It was hard for me to learn the lope going from English to WP. I always looked for the hiccup. That is what I call it. When they are going so collected and slow there is this pause just before the front leg reaches out. Then it hits the ground and you get a little bump. Which if you speed it up it is the rocking chair of the canter. It just has this moment of hesitation. Hope that helps you see it a diffrent way.
Yes it helps! Thanks!
     
    03-06-2012, 02:31 PM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by raywonk    
They call that a trollope and it is not a lop/canter at all. They are trotting in the front and loping in the back with a little shoulder lift.
It was hard for me to learn the lope going from English to WP. I always looked for the hiccup. That is what I call it. When they are going so collected and slow there is this pause just before the front leg reaches out. Then it hits the ground and you get a little bump. Which if you speed it up it is the rocking chair of the canter. It just has this moment of hesitation. Hope that helps you see it a diffrent way.
It's called a trope....or a 4 beat, and they are LOPING in the front and TROTTING in the back, and that means the horse is not engaged in the hind end and has flattened out the topline. You have to backwards.
     
    03-15-2012, 02:47 PM
  #26
Green Broke
Try circles, you can also stop and back him when he is getting too fast then go right back into the canter again. Also, I found an excercise that I liked where you canter for 16 strides, stop, back, then canter for 15 strides, stop, back, and so on until you are down to 12 strides. I do that both directions to keep my mare on her toes. I also did an excercise of canter a 20 meter, stop, back, then turn and canter off in the opposite direction for a 20 meter.

If you have your horse thinking about the stop and back they are less likely to go flying off into a fast canter.
     
    03-19-2012, 06:06 PM
  #27
Foal
A lot of times, making a square, with tight turns, stops and backing help a lot!
     
    03-21-2012, 10:51 PM
  #28
Weanling
If he hasn't done it for a while, he needs to get the strength and self-carriage back to hold himself while loping. Often if a horse is off balance their first reaction is to speed up.

Personally, I don't like the stop-and-go approach to slowing a horse down. In my experience, you end up with a hesitant, weaker moving horse, and often a more nervous horse that anticipates a stop rather than driving through.

Is he trained to go off your spur or leg at all? Is he pretty broke through his body?

A video would really be the best way to see what is going on to help him.
DraftXDressage likes this.
     
    03-26-2012, 11:03 PM
  #29
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by QHDragon    
Try circles, you can also stop and back him when he is getting too fast then go right back into the canter again.

If you have your horse thinking about the stop and back they are less likely to go flying off into a fast canter.
I agree with DazzleHerWithRoses that making a square, with tight turns. I personally don't like the stop and back its hard on the horse, plus every time you stop and back your teaching a bad habit for a good solid stop, ie horsemanship. I have been taught when your horse is getting too speedy turn them to the inside down to a trot and do some bending make them work a bit...you are not taking away from the forward motion and your teaching that when they get a speedy lope they will be be put to work so then when they are put back on the rail they learn that this is the "easy place". Personal opinion just an alternative to the stop and back method.

Good Luck
SimplySoft
     
    03-27-2012, 08:47 AM
  #30
Trained
Hmmm. As usual, I guess I'm weird. For me (and my horses) there is walk, trot, canter (or lope) and gallop. In each of those motions, I expect them, within reason, to be ready to go faster or slower. For faster, I take a more forward seat. If need be, I'll whisper, "Pick it up" and gently squeeze. For slower, I settle back some. If that doesn't do it, then I use my pinkie - as the left shoulder goes forward, my left pinkie drags on the rein. Then right, left, etc. Usually they ease off within a few strides. I may add "Easy...", which always means slow it down a bit. "Eaasssyyyyy" means slow down more...

Practicing adjusting the pace is just like practicing a turn. In particular, my mare is easily bored...and when bored, she likes to liven things up. I'd rather she didn't, and adjusting her pace is a way to prevent 'boredom'.

I think of paces as gears. Just as I expect to be able to vary my speed in 2nd gear, I expect to do it at a trot. And just as I can redline my car in 2nd gear, I can trot a horse fast enough that a canter makes more sense.
     

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slowing down, western pleasure

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