broncs
   

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broncs

This is a discussion on broncs within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • +how to go pro riding broncs.
  • Former bronc horse turned riding horse

 
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    10-31-2009, 12:58 PM
  #1
Weanling
broncs

In bronc riding what do they do after the horses serve their purpose? How long of a carreer does a bronc really have? And after all that bucking can you ride em?or are they too afraid of humans to let you get near them.wouldnt it be cool to get a clinician who could change a bronc into a riding horse?
     
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    10-31-2009, 01:07 PM
  #2
Trained
Normally broncs come from riding horses who decide they want to buck. Most do not go the other way around.

What happens to them after will depend on who owns them. Which stock contractor. I know some will go into breeding stock others are just turned out and some are re homed into NON riding homes. However not too many go that rout.
     
    10-31-2009, 01:32 PM
  #3
Trained
The reason alot of broncs become broncs is because the like to buck.

We did own a former bucking horse, however it's not common. Most of the time he was a great horse but I played around with barrel racing with him and it didn't matter how many times I rode him he would always buck when he was in the Arena. We usually had a 30 second bucking show before we ran our pattern.
     
    10-31-2009, 02:27 PM
  #4
Yearling
Yes, those horses, were horses that just bucked, people couldn't brake the buck out of them. That doesn't mean they are mean, I have seen several, that when the buzzer sounded, they just stopped! Rider on or not. Then trotted calmly away.

In a away, you should thank the rodeos and people who do take these horse in, because if they didn't (those who oppose it will find this upsetting) they would probably be sent to slaughter. But heck, who wants a bucking horse? I don't.
     
    10-31-2009, 02:42 PM
  #5
Green Broke
You can really compare it most to racing I'd say. The stock contractors have spent years perfecting "bucking" lines - horses with a natural buck in them, but not a lot of meanness. Rodeos do not want "mean" horses because if they start going after their riders, it's dangerous.

Back in the old days, it was actually quite common for horses to double as both riding partners and bucking horses. They were trained, like any other horse, that when a bucking strap was on, the show had started! Of course, you had to watch 'em as riding partners, because they all had a tendency to want to buck even out of the arena.

Anyway in comparison to racing, I'd say yes, a goodly amount likely end up at slaughter. Horses that don't buck good enough, horses that are retired and can't be retrained, etc. Good bucking horses however go on to breeding careers in hopes to pass that wicked buck on that made them great.

One of my favorite stories of all time is of Midnight, one of the greatest Canadian bucking horses of the old days. When he was retired, he lived out his day in a grassy pasture and was given a proper burial when he died and his memorial reads:

Underneath this sod lies

A great bucking hoss.

There never lived a cowboy

He couldn't toss.

His name was Midnight

His coat was black as coal.

If there's a hoss heaven,

Please God, rest his soul.

Midnight: The world's greatest bucking horse | TheFencePost.com


     
    11-01-2009, 01:15 AM
  #6
Trained
Bucking horses are a pretty big business now a days. And as stated above, some wind up back in the breeding program, and others sold.

I've heard of buckers competing well into their teens. One horse at a rodeo I went to this year was 19!!! He ditched his rider too, so he was good at his job for an older horse!

I would say that many of the buckers, after doing it for so long may never be retrained to actually ride; I think the tendency to go back to their 'old job' may be too strong. This is not to say that "all" buckers are hopeless causes that couldn't be retrained to ride, or perhaps drive, but you may not be as successful with a bronc, as opposed to an OTTB.
     
    11-01-2009, 02:04 AM
  #7
Yearling
I know a lady that usually buys her horses from the auction, she once bought this big gray gelding. He seemed like a nice horse, rode good, and she seemed to be doing really well with him. She ended up running into the guy that had taken him to the auction, he couldn't believe she was riding him, apparantly the horse was supposed to be sold to a kill buyer and not a private home, he was a former bucking horse (don't know why they were selling him). Unfortunately this lady is not a very confident rider and he was sent to the next sale, no idea what happened to him.

I once read an article about an old bucking horse, can't remember the age, but seems like they were guessing her around 30 and she was still bucking! They considered her special and she was now getting special treatment, and they planned to let her retire and live out her days w/ them.
     
    11-01-2009, 12:32 PM
  #8
Trained
My dad had a blue roan mare when he was a young man that would buck very hard at the drop of a hat. He rode her hard every day for several weeks and she stil buck sometime during the day. He said she was getting better at bucking faster than he was getting better at riding so he took her to a rodeo and traded for a bucking horse that was barely bucking and not bucking anyone off. The roan mare went on to be a really great bucking horse and the horse he traded for had a long life never bucking again. Most pro rodeo horses are retired or used for breeding. I would bet there are fewer bucking horses that go to slaughter than there are backyard pets.
     
    11-01-2009, 03:35 PM
  #9
Started
I've met many broncos that were the gentlest horses when not being rode. They aren't scared of people nor are they angry, they just like to buck.

     
    11-02-2009, 02:24 PM
  #10
Trained
Bucking horses like to buck line my reiners loves to stop. It is just what they love to do some it is what they are bred to do too.
     

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