Disrespect and Irritation. - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 10-14-2013, 01:22 AM Thread Starter
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Disrespect and Irritation.

I ride a 7 year old who I've had for two years and I've ridden him in a snaffle for a long time. For a while I rode bareback (I had a accident where I got bucked off, a concuission, and a fear of a saddles, not my horse.) And so I bought a set of reins that clip on. So clipped it to a halter and put it on my horse and got on bareback, and I rode like this for three months. My horse did as good with this as he did with a bit. And so I've been riding with a saddle and with the halter. He responds very well to the pressure of my heels and halter. Ive noticed that when I ask him to turn or roll in to a trot or a lope he gets irritated and swishes his tail, and it irritates me. And then he starts to throw his head and bounce it up and down.

What should I do in this situation? He does this bareback, in a saddle, in a bit and with out. I work him before I ride and I ride in a pen and out side it. After a while his irratating tail swishing isnt as bad but it still bothers me because it's disrespectful.

That girl is a Cowboy.
Sometimes the best cowboys, arnt cowboys at all.
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post #2 of 10 Old 10-14-2013, 07:09 AM
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He could be in pain, have you vetted him lately?
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post #3 of 10 Old 10-14-2013, 09:12 AM
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My mare was doing something similar. Shed feel very bouncy/crow-hoppy. Tail swishing and head bobbing.

She was majorly twisted in her back/hip area.. Had the Chiro evaluate her and adjust her. She's much better now.

she was in pain. Sounds like your horse is too.
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post #4 of 10 Old 10-14-2013, 09:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JazzyGirl View Post
Ive noticed that when I ask him to turn or roll in to a trot or a lope he gets irritated and swishes his tail, and it irritates me. And then he starts to throw his head and bounce it up and down.

......but it still bothers me because it's disrespectful.
Sounds like YOU are the one irritating him; not the other way around.

This doesn't sound like disrespect to me. This sounds like he is in pain. And he's trying to tell you it hurts in the only way he can.

Have him checked by a equine chiropractor, an equine dentist, and an equine lameness vet (not just your local "any animal" vet). He is hurting somewhere.

How often does the farrier do his feet?
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post #5 of 10 Old 11-16-2013, 09:47 AM
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It's one of three things: Fear, Pain or Refusal.

For fear, try changing locations-indoor vs outdoor, home pasture vs. strange place
For pain, you can vet/massage/chiro-or check saddle fit-change your seat position.
Or try long-lining him and see if he can ride through it riderless-all clues.
Otherwise you are left with refusal.
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post #6 of 10 Old 11-16-2013, 03:23 PM Thread Starter
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Its refusal (; He's gotten a lot better recently, I've been riding or working with him almost everyother day. He will turn in to a lope with out grumpy attitude and his tail whipping isn't as annoying and noticeable((:

That girl is a Cowboy.
Sometimes the best cowboys, arnt cowboys at all.
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post #7 of 10 Old 11-16-2013, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
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Beau - When his feet need it, there is one coming out soon to do his feet. We have ground that wears them down a lot so it takes longer for them to grow out.
I also don't believe its pain, he is a grumpy guy, for the past three months I've been riding a lot more then the past two years. (I'm finally comfortable in the saddle and with him after I got bucked off a lot) so he's lazy barrelbeginner has ridden him out before, and he was grumpy about going in to a lope and turning and such. But now He does it with out attitude(:

That girl is a Cowboy.
Sometimes the best cowboys, arnt cowboys at all.
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post #8 of 10 Old 11-16-2013, 04:49 PM
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JG, I just read this thread and your horse reminds me of April, my horse.

She is one of these horses that needs regular work. She must be ridden at least twice a week or she is full of attitude and very difficult. She shakes her head, swishes her tail, crow hops and is just ornery.

When ridden regularly, she is soft, responsive, and an honest hard worker. I love her to pieces!

I am so glad you figured it out! I just keep in mind that my horse needs her exercise to be happy and it helps me the more consistent with our workouts.
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post #9 of 10 Old 11-16-2013, 06:00 PM
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A previous horse of mine tried that until he felt the sting of a riding crop behind my leg. Actually it was a pop more than a sting. As long as I carried the crop and he knew it he was good as gold. He just needed an attitude adjustment and got it.
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post #10 of 10 Old 11-17-2013, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JazzyGirl View Post
Beau - When his feet need it, there is one coming out soon to do his feet. We have ground that wears them down a lot so it takes longer for them to grow out.
A lot of people make this mistake. They think that as long as hooves aren't long, then they are fine.

Even though hooves can wear themselves down, you still need regular farrier visits so that the hoof can stay BALANCED. Hooves don't always wear balanced. An unbalanced hoof, especially when he is still so young, could set him up for a long life of problems.

My farrier and I were talking about this not too long ago, about how you almost never see navicular problems in expensive cutting horses (for one example) simply because that horse has had perfect regular farrier care since the day they were born. A lot of people turn out a horse until they are 3-years-old and just let their feet "wear on there own" before they become a riding horse. Lack of care when they are young is what leads to bigger issues down the road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JazzyGirl View Post
I also don't believe its pain, he is a grumpy guy, for the past three months I've been riding a lot more then the past two years. (I'm finally comfortable in the saddle and with him after I got bucked off a lot) so he's lazy barrelbeginner has ridden him out before, and he was grumpy about going in to a lope and turning and such. But now He does it with out attitude(:
How do you KNOW it isn't pain? Have you had him checked? Or are you just choosing to ignore the possibility that he might be in pain?

Pain could very well be WHY he is grumpy. I'd be grumpy too if my back hurt or my hocks hurt, but my boss kept making me run around.

And pain could very well be why he is bucking. Yes, attitude and behavior come into play here too, but you aren't going to solve the behavior problems if you don't solve the pain problems.

People used to believe that the world was flat and you'd fall off the edge .... and were then proven wrong. I bet your "belief" would be proven wrong if you actually took the time to give him the medical attention he deserves.

Drives me crazy when people just ignore the health of their horses without having it checked out properly.

Have his teeth ever been done? And don't tell me that "he doesn't drop any grain when he eats so his teeth must be fine" ...... because people incorrectly think that as well. All horses should at least have their horses teeth checked every year, starting when they are about 2 or 3 years old.
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It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.
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