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Dumb problem,...ugh

This is a discussion on Dumb problem,...ugh within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        06-06-2008, 09:06 PM
      #11
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mlkarel2010
    I was informed that I can't punch more holes because the saddle will fall apart, lol, it's a piece of crud! Hopefully I won't have problems when I get to use my saddle!
    the saddle will fall apart if you punch two more holes in it?!?
         
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        06-07-2008, 01:07 AM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mlkarel2010
    I was informed that I can't punch more holes because the saddle will fall apart, lol, it's a piece of crud! Hopefully I won't have problems when I get to use my saddle!
    the saddle will fall apart if you punch two more holes in it?!?
    haha, yup, it's old, like 25 years and is used on like 6 colts a day everyday!! It makes me have better balance though, and I guess it'll be better when I can use my own saddle
         
        06-10-2008, 04:40 AM
      #13
    Foal
    Hey

    Your stirrups are the correct length when.
    FOLLOW THESE STEPS:

    1) Sit in the saddle
    2) get in your western riding position
    3) Take your feet out of the stirrups
    YOU MAY NEED SOMEONE ON THE GROUND TO WATCH FOR THIS
    4) Move your legs around for around 10 secs
    5) Then just drop you legs into a relaxed position
    6) If your stirrups are the right length then you should be able to lift you toe WITHOUT using any leg muscles and put the ball of your foot in the stirrup.
    YOU MAY NEED THE PERSON ON THE GROUND TO HOLD THE STIRRUP IN PLACE WHILE YOU ARE LIFTING YOUR TOE.
    7) LENGTHEN you sturrups if you have to use leg muscles
    SHORTEN if they are too long.

    This is the correct length for riding western for English there needs to be a definite bend in your knee.

    Hope this helps
    (by the way a world renowned trainer did tell me this)
    XX
         
        06-10-2008, 12:38 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Ooh I think moomoo had a great idea about taking them out and then putting them back in to make them feel shorter!
         
        06-10-2008, 05:12 PM
      #15
    Foal
    How long until you're able to use your saddle? Maybe just ride without the stirrups or bareback until you can use your saddle. You don't want to keep in the habit of keeping your heels up.
         
        06-10-2008, 09:28 PM
      #16
    Green Broke
    I rode in my saddle today, I think my stirrups are either the right length or too short.....

    I still have a habit of riding with my heels up because that's just how my muscles are used to it, but I think that will work its self out quickly because I can't ride colts because they all went home because of the tornado....

    I have a video of me riding my 4-H horse i'm going to try to post
         
        06-24-2008, 03:21 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    So how short it TOO short? I know this guy that is an excellent rider, at least getting the best part out of his horse...but his legs are cramped up which cause's his shoulders to hunch in. So how do you tell when its too short?
         
        06-29-2008, 09:26 AM
      #18
    Foal
    Hi. So you have ridden English? So you were taught to close the leg to post? The English saddles have the billets stretching downward under the Rider's thigh, right? Does the Western saddle you are using have the stirrup leather as far back as: under your thigh? Just as in the english saddles, there are many types of western saddles...some made for a straighter seat, some for a more seated seat...try this: without the stirrup, drop your leg, allow it to loosen and relax, lift just your toes...is the stirrup bottom just on top of your boot? It should be. If it is too far forward you will find yourself sitting on your spine tip--unable to close the leg, forced to close the knee. If it is not touching your boot , it is too high and you will have to overflex your knee which raises your heel. You must be able to sit straight in your ribcage and rest on the 3 bones of your pelvic to push down on the balls of your feet and allow the heel to sink. The whole saddle may be a 'wrong' type and/or size. It also helps if the horse has a jog trot so the Rider can adapt at a slow gait...good luck and happy trails, : :) Naguru
         
        07-01-2008, 08:38 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Dumb questions are always the questions not asked! You can never ask a DUMB question! Ok First- when you stand in the stirrups with your heels down you should have 3inches between you and your saddle seat. Second- put your heels down and put a little pressure in your stirrups. This will also help keep your butt down and help to tell your horse to slow down and lower his head. Good Luck!!!
         
        10-02-2008, 09:56 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Hmm...

    I'm going to disagree with all of you, but this has always worked for me. I barrel race and for me and most of my friends, the best way to sink deep in the saddle and keep those heels down is longer stirrups. I'm not kidding. I have always ridden with long stirrups and it has caused me to keep my heels down because when they slip up, I lose my stirrups. Whenever I have shorter stirrups, my heels flip up because I don't have to stretch down, and I then usually drop them. As long as you have a deep seat, you will have deep heels.

    Hope that didn't sound too out of wack, haha.

    PeaceLove.
         

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