How do you know what your horse is best for?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Western Riding

How do you know what your horse is best for?

This is a discussion on How do you know what your horse is best for? within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • REINING HORSE BLOODLINES "HALTER HORES"
  • Who do you no what your horse wont

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-25-2010, 09:09 AM
  #1
Started
How do you know what your horse is best for?

How do you know what your horse will excel in? What type of horse do you look for in the events?

Western Pleasure it out of the picture, but what about reining, cutting, ranch, trail, cow horse, team penning, barrels?

My horse is mostly halter bred, and is built like a tank. He's in training right now and we're working on the basics teaching him to neck rein.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-25-2010, 10:56 PM
  #2
Pro
Weanling
[QUOTE=White Foot;614625]How do you know what your horse will excel in?QUOTE]

I think that your horse has to love what it's doing to excel in it's job. I know lots of horses bred very very very well for specific jobs, have the conformation, athletic ability, mind...etc. But when it comes down to it the horse has to love (or at least like) what its doing. I don't think you can be 100% sure until you and your horse have tried different things.

I'm not really sure if that's what you ment....Just a thought.
     
    04-25-2010, 11:19 PM
  #3
Super Moderator
With Lacey, I discovered what she loves to do (being a trail pony) basically because she kinda forced me to. She kept freaking out in every english saddle I tried on her (I originally bought her with the intention of doing dressage and things like that) so one day I decided to try her in a western saddle. As soon as I got that saddle on her, she went perfectly.
Then, I took her to a camp last summer and did a lot of trail riding. I had previously thought that she was a spaz on the trail and that that was not something she was interested in. About the time a flock of 100 or more quail cme bursting out of the trees right next to her, with no spooking on her part, I realized that she really does like being on the trail. Now I've been riding her more extensively on the trail and boy, she is the bravest, most curious, fun to ride on trails horse I have ever ridden. Whenever the trailer is out, she starts bouncing around and waving her head at it like "people are going somewhere! I wanna go!" so I'm pretty sure she enjoys being on the trail.

Basically, listen to your horse, when he finds something that he dearly loves to do, you'll be able to tell. Lacey is not built to be a great trail horse (tiny legs compared to her body, really rocky trot, etc) but she really is. So, just try out lots of stuff with him and he'll let you know. =)
     
    04-25-2010, 11:46 PM
  #4
Trained
Your horse will let ya know if you're doing something wrong, or if they want something new.

I had to do a lot of searching with Annie. She didn't really want to be a reiner. She's get pissy if I asked for a run down for a reining stop, she didn't like any dressage, and she didn't dig down in turns enough or barrels. So I took her out on the trail in an english saddle (When I was just learning to ride english) and thought I'd be a dare devil and take her out on the little CX jumps they had set up. I was too afraid to try anything big but Annie adored it and has started actually pulling me into jumps. So I think that's her calling. She wants to jump and I'm going to let her :)

As for yor halter bred horse, I'd maybe consider reining or cutting. If pleasure is out of the question. A lot of Pleasure horses are Halter horses, but I see a lot of people in this area use their Halter horses for reining too.
     
    04-26-2010, 07:29 AM
  #5
Started
Thanks everyone :)

I think he already let me know. At first he was trained with alot of direct rein but being in training again he's 100% better at riding with a loose rein and is very quick to learn to rein.
     
    04-26-2010, 07:30 PM
  #6
Weanling
When I first look at a horse I asses their pedigree...if there aren't bigger names up front then I kind of don't use the breeding for what they will excel out but at least you can get an idea. If they have the bigger names up close then I'll generally expect them to be that type of horse.

Then I look at their conformation. Then their personality/mind and what they like to do.

I think breeding tends to be a pretty good indicator, if they good horses are closer up, as the good horses get further away I think it won't always be indicative of what they will be good it.

Conformation and the "will" of the horse is extremely important too after you look at the pedigree. Especially the "will/want" part. And for this a horse will normally tell you when you are pushing them to do something they don't want to do.
     
    04-28-2010, 01:17 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by StylishK    
When I first look at a horse I asses their pedigree...if there aren't bigger names up front then I kind of don't use the breeding for what they will excel out but at least you can get an idea. If they have the bigger names up close then I'll generally expect them to be that type of horse.

Then I look at their conformation. Then their personality/mind and what they like to do.

I think breeding tends to be a pretty good indicator, if they good horses are closer up, as the good horses get further away I think it won't always be indicative of what they will be good it.

Conformation and the "will" of the horse is extremely important too after you look at the pedigree. Especially the "will/want" part. And for this a horse will normally tell you when you are pushing them to do something they don't want to do.
Great comments. If your horse doesn't have any "cow" in them, cutting, team penning and roping are OUT. His bloodlines will give you an idea what he may be more of a natural at.
     
    04-28-2010, 01:20 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridehorses99    
Great comments. If your horse doesn't have any "cow" in them, cutting, team penning and roping are OUT. His bloodlines will give you an idea what he may be more of a natural at.
Exactly.

And obviously there are expections (I knew a 2x World Champ in WP who was cutting bred).

But as a general rule a pedigree will tell you a lot about the horse.
     
    04-28-2010, 01:23 PM
  #9
mls
Trained
Expose them to as many things as possible and see what they enjoy doing. Doesn't matter how they are bred or even how they are built. Some conformation issues can determine what a horse should not do if it is questionable they will stay sound at a more demanding discipline. But there are exceptions to every rule.
     
    04-28-2010, 03:29 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridehorses99    
Great comments. If your horse doesn't have any "cow" in them, cutting, team penning and roping are OUT. His bloodlines will give you an idea what he may be more of a natural at.

Generally I would agree with you, but recently my mind has been changed on that fact.

Toni just brought home Kalimari, OTTB Gelding, 16hh, and racing bloodlines with NO COW. But ****, I was riding him on the other side of the arena from where Toni was on a calf with her older mare Chikkita and Kalimari wanted that cow so bad, it was ridiculous. I'm like, "WTF? Don't you know you're a racehorse??" Hehe, Toni has informed me she penned on him last weekend and they came close to taking the jackpot although I've never worked or seen him worked on a cow. I won't ever doubt the abilities of a no-cow hrose again, though :)
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0