I Don't Know What To Do..... - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Western Riding

I Don't Know What To Do.....

This is a discussion on I Don't Know What To Do..... within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    Like Tree11Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-20-2013, 01:06 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Run her until she doesn't want to run anymore! When she wants to stop, let her, but if she moves her feet and she wants to be antsy again, run her some more. Teach her that rest is a reward! Good luck
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-23-2013, 09:37 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    Disclaimer - I am not a horse trainer. The following advice is worth what you paid for it - nothing. Never do anything that you are not comfortable with or could compromise your safety. That said...

    It sounds like you are unable to effectively stop or slow down the horse when he gets like that. So breaking down to a trot or slow canter will not work for you.

    Assuming you have a safe place to do so, I suggest letting the horse run. When he starts to slow down, make him run faster. When he gets tired of that, make him run more. Do this frequently. He should get the point pretty quickly. After the horse is past ready to slow down, them slow him down. Speed control should always be your decision. When you ask for a gait (any gait) and speed, the horse should stay at that gait/speed until asked for something different.

    You can do this at other gaits and speeds to reinforce the point.


    The "won't stand still" is probably an easier thing to address.Practice standing still. You have to make absolutely sure you are not giving the horse any type of cue to move. You cannot fidget and expect the horse to stay still. As soon as the horse starts to move (his feet) start moving him as if it were your idea. Do tight circles, working trot, serpentines, hips over... the point is to make the horse work. How long you have to keep this up depends on your horse. Some are more stubborn that others. After that, stop again. Relax yourself. Rest the reins. Don't move your hands. Keep you legs relaxed and still. It is harder than it sounds. Most people I know with horses that can't stand still are ridden by people who can't remain still. Do this "keep still" exercise for 15-20 minutes each day.

    As far as the bit... I don't see a problem with _trying_ a different bit (as opposed to changing to a different bit). Your current bit may be part of the problem. Your hands, or other cues, may be part of the problem. When I first started riding, people noted that horses usually went faster when I rode them. It was true - I was inadvertently cueing them to do so.

    Don't be so quick to say "not me." Have a third party observe you and determine that. We all have bad habits that we are unable to see.

    Be careful if trying a new bit. You need "softer" hands when using a "stronger" bit. I agree that it is the training and not the bit. But sometimes, a different bit can get the horses attention. Once you get the desired reaction, you can try going back to your old bit. If using a "stronger" or even different bit, the horse will very likely react differently. That may be a negative reaction if the horse doesn't agree with the bit or you pull too hard on a "stronger" bit.

    For example, let's say you take a horse that has only known a snaffle or hackamore and drop a curb bit in his mouth. The horse could possibly react poorly if he doesn't like the bit. This problem could be magnified if you are using the same amount of pressure, since that pressure is now magnified by the leverage of the bit. Definitely not something you want to test on a running horse with no brakes.

    Best route would be to get a trainer involved. He/she could evaluate the situation, see if you are contributing to the problem and suggest some solutions tailored to you and your horse.
         
        02-11-2013, 03:03 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gamingirl22    
    My 10 year old 15 hand Quarter Horse mare has been very bad lately while I've been riding her. She loves to run, so I let her gallop in the field. But when I tell her it's time to slow down by using 'press and release' on the reins, she simply ignores me and barely slows down at all!! Also, after I finally get her stopped, she's very antsy and wants to run again, so I pull back a little on the reins and tell her to whoa or at least slow down but when I do that, she pulls her head forward and takes the reins out of my hands or she just won't stand still. She listens to me very well at the walk and trot, but when I ask her to canter she just takes off into a gallop and I feel bad because I'm constantly pulling back on her mouth but I don't know how to make her listen to me. Do I need a stronger bit?
    I was thinking that maybe I should lunge her before I ride her and maybe she'll listen to me better after that, but I just don't have time to lunge her and ride her and also exercise my other horses when I get home from school in the wintertime. What should I do?? I mean I want my horse to have some speed because I want her to be a gaming horse, but I want to be able to control her!
    This question you asked almost a month ago will get the same answers as your current question about using a stronger bit.

    No, you do not need a stronger bit. And no, I would not put your horse anywhere near gaming events until you can control your horse. This is exactly the type of situation where if you don't slow down and re-train your horse, you are going to create a monster in the arena.

    Your horse already has some terrible bad habits that were created accidentally by YOU the rider. Whether that started with allowing her to jerk on the bit, or continuing to pull on the reins when she was already stopped, or sending her mixed body signals .... the end result is the same and she needs to be retrained.

    You've got great advice going on your other thread, so I won't repeat it here, but I still think a few riding lessons with an experienced trainer will help wonders. It is much better to see these things in person.
         
        02-11-2013, 03:39 PM
      #14
    Showing
    To me it sounds like she needs more transitions rather than distances.

    What I mean is canter for a bit, then come down to a trot. Then walk... then go up to a canter.. then come down for a trot for a bit, and then a walk.

    Change it up. Don't spend too long cantering. Take your time and walk twice as long as you canter. If your horse is listening, then they can go a little longer but always transition down BEFORE they get out of control.

    It'll just take consistency. Maybe consider having a trainer work with your horse on slowdown/stop aids. Pulling isn't the only aid to stop a horse....
         
        02-18-2013, 06:53 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Try see-sawing your reins.
         
        02-18-2013, 09:28 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by moniegx3    
    Try see-sawing your reins.
    Please don't
         
        02-19-2013, 12:46 AM
      #17
    Started
    **Takes a deep breath and backs out of thread**
         
        02-21-2013, 03:40 AM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by moniegx3    
    Try see-sawing your reins.
    Worst advice you could give on a thread like this!


    OP. I personaly would go back to slow work and gain your controll there!
    HollyBubbles and Kayty like this.
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:30 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0