Not turning well - neck reining
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Western Riding

Not turning well - neck reining

This is a discussion on Not turning well - neck reining within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Horses with neck turned
  • Horse wont neck rein left

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-29-2010, 02:13 PM
  #1
Yearling
Not turning well - neck reining

I was riding Lena yesterday, and she was being a little stubborn about alot of things, I don't know if that's because I took her away from her food to ride her or what, but it was making me a little frustrated.

She turns well doing circles and going on the left lead canter.. but when we go onto the right lead, and we get to a certain corner in the arena, she just wont turn that well. Its like slow motion turning, and its too slow to make it around, so she cantered right into the face and stopped.

I am using one hand, both reins in the left hand, and I find that when I use two hands, it works alot better because she listens to it more.. but she knows how to do it, because she is a reiner.. I just think she is being stubborn because I am new to her.

Do you have any suggestion on exercises I could do to practice her turning. I am going to do lots of circles, but anything besides that.
Also, I could do figure eights :)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-29-2010, 08:15 PM
  #2
Yearling
I rode her again today, and we practiced lots of turning, and she is getting a bit better. I think something may be wrong with her teeth though, because normally she lets the bit go into her mouth easily when bridling her, but today she didnt want to open her mouth for quite a while.
When I tried to lead her with the bridle, she wont move, so I pull a bit on the bit, and she resists and pulls back.
Not sure if she might just be being stubborn, but I don't want to hurt her by pulling on her mouth to get her to move, but how else do I get her to move?
By the way she wears a low port curb bit.
     
    01-29-2010, 09:40 PM
  #3
Foal
She may just be a little stiff in her back on the left side and doesn't want to bend it very much. The circles should help if that's the problem, take them slow first so she can start to stretch her muscles easily, and push her into the corners a little at first going clockwise. Sounds like its just her being a little stubborn when you lead her but it might be her teeth.. cavity possibly? If the circles don't work I would call a vet.
     
    01-30-2010, 02:53 PM
  #4
Yearling
Okay that sounds good!
Another thing I noticed though.. she turns to the right really good when practicing spins.. to the left not so much.

But, when I am riding to the right around the arena cantering, she turns soooo slow and doesnt make it around in time and she almost hits the fence.
I think she might be doing it on purpose, because she wants to go slower, and when we almost hit the fence, she has to trot. She is kinda lazy and out of shape at the moment, so that might be why.
     
    01-30-2010, 04:45 PM
  #5
Started
I always leave a horse for an hour at least before work for digestive reasons as
Much as psychological. You are new to her - and now you give her feed and won't let her eat it
Then she pulls back when you try to lead her. Maybe she is being a little cussed so as to say: "I don't want to play"

Most horses are more flexible to one side or the other. My own horse is more flexible to the left. The only way to free the horse up is to work her to the right to rebalance her. Lots of large circles to the right which become tighter as time goes on.

Personally I'd go back to using two hands because you'd lower your hands and shorten the right rein to bend her neck to the right but support her with the left. You can neck rein later when she is more flexible.
Then of course, you've got your legs and seat to turn her.

If you try to change too much early on in the relationship then she will resist.

How was she ridden by her previous owner - do you know?

B G
     
    01-30-2010, 06:11 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
I always leave a horse for an hour at least before work for digestive reasons as
Much as psychological. You are new to her - and now you give her feed and won't let her eat it
Then she pulls back when you try to lead her. Maybe she is being a little cussed so as to say: "I don't want to play"

Most horses are more flexible to one side or the other. My own horse is more flexible to the left. The only way to free the horse up is to work her to the right to rebalance her. Lots of large circles to the right which become tighter as time goes on.

Personally I'd go back to using two hands because you'd lower your hands and shorten the right rein to bend her neck to the right but support her with the left. You can neck rein later when she is more flexible.
Then of course, you've got your legs and seat to turn her.

If you try to change too much early on in the relationship then she will resist.

How was she ridden by her previous owner - do you know?
I didnt feed her, she gets fed by the people where we board at.. she gets fed right before I come home from school, and when we go over there, she still has some food.
I have to ride her more than 2 a week, so I have to ride her after school sometimes, and I have no choice but to ride when she is being fed, as it gets dark soon.
She doesnt pull back when I lead her away from the food, she really doesnt mind, and she loves the attention.. but once I put the bridle on her, her ears go back and she looks like she is depressed or something.

The thing is, the circles we were doing was the size of half the arena, and this arena is huge, full size dressage arena. I mainly ride 2 hands as well, but she still doesnt turn well to the right when cantering.

By the previous owners, she was ridden neck reining one hand, reining and western pleasure, the owner wore spurs, but I tried those and I don't really like them ,and she responds better to me for now without them.

Thank you! :)
     
    01-30-2010, 06:25 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I would work on a lot of bending to the left (i believe that's the side she is having an issue with?). When you are warming her up, walk her in a small but not to small circle go around about 6-10 times, and then trot that same circle, and then canter it. I would do that as a warm up and really get her flexing good, that will help you a lot!

As for the not wanting to move when she is all tacked up, it could be her teeth, but when you got the vet check to buy her, I am sure that he checked her teeth out and would have told you if they needed to be floated. I think what Berry G said could be true. She could just be telling you 'i don't wanna work mom!!'

She could very well just be testing you too because you and her are new to eachother. But don't get frustrated!! I know its WAY easier said then done, but she will pick up on that and test you even more. Everything with horses takes TONS of patients, and I know you have some, cause you waited SO long to the perfect horse!
     
    01-30-2010, 06:38 PM
  #8
Ink
Weanling
Other than possible physical reasons for her resistance to turning to the right, which you should probably get looked at if possible, I'd suggest leg, leg and more leg. From your post it sounds like you are mainly using your reins to steer. I think you should start planning your turns early, since you know she has issues. Look in the direction you want to go, and apply pressure with your left calf in addition to your rein. And if that doesn't work, there's no shame in "cheating". Just reach up with your right hand and give a little direct pull to get the message across, and then go back to riding with one hand.
     
    01-31-2010, 08:31 PM
  #9
Yearling
When I am training my reining horse I ALWAYS ride 2 handed it gets them supple and ready for 1 handed. Anyways use your legs not just your hands its not "neck reining" its "leg reining".
     
    02-02-2010, 02:20 PM
  #10
Foal
When I teach neck reining, I am not teaching it. I get a good connection to both shoulders, both into and away from the rein. As they get better, my hands are closer and viola they neck rein. They understand that the 'neck rein' is asking the shoulder on that side to go away from the rein and the shoulder on the opposite side understands to follow the rein on it's side.

Then there is a fun exercise to really get the horse nice. It teaches the horse to follow your leg. So if you want to go left you lay the left leg on the horse and the horse goes left.

This works easiest in a shank bit, but it can be taught with a snaffle. You take your reins and make them even and long enough that when you lower your hand you are off the bit. You are not allowed to use cheat by using a direct rein or adjusting the length of the reins.

I will talk about going left. Start at the walk and bump the horse at the girth with your left leg. If/when the horse does not turn his head to the left, raise the reins and bump upward staying over the center of the neck in the same rhythm of your leg. As soon as the horse even moves his head to the left stop bumping, but leave your leg on his side. If he looks back forward, bump with your leg and if he does not look left start bumping with the rein again. He may take his head in the wrong direction, just stay focused and continue what you are doing and release as soon as the head starts going in the right direction.

When the horse will look in the direction of your leg consistently, ask him to look deeper by bumping first with the leg and following with rein if needed. Again always releasing when the nose goes in the right direction.

Move to the trot and keep asking the horse to follow deeper until he settles into a spin. (Keep the same rhythm in the turn.) Take your left leg off and put your right leg toward the shoulder. Let him out after a few steps by removing the right leg and placing your left leg back on him. Go right back to following your leg and build until he will hold a full turn and then two asking him to hurry up just before letting him out.

Good for warm ups and cool downs.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
neck reining Horse Dreamer Horse Training 6 10-26-2009 08:23 PM
Neck reining Lori1983 Horse Training 19 10-12-2009 10:46 PM
Neck Reining WPshy Horse Training 4 08-01-2008 11:27 PM
Neck-reining? SonnyWimps Horse Training 19 07-25-2008 02:13 PM
Neck Reining ~MavvyMyBeauty Horse Training 23 02-21-2008 02:54 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0