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Posting while trotting...male riders

This is a discussion on Posting while trotting...male riders within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • West surrey female poney trotting
  • Video young girls riding English horseback trotting

 
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    02-26-2011, 07:12 PM
  #61
Guest
Years ago I was taught to ride 'Western' by an old, bent bow legged Canadian cowboy who had been involved with horses since he was a kid. In the 1930s he had been a winning rodeo rider. By the time I met him he had formed a Western riding club in Surrey, where anyone who rode horses used the English hunting seat. Kennie's first job with new members was to teach them how to ride Western on his Western schooled horses.

The first lesson was to adjust the stirrups so that the leg was carried almost straight. Enough bend was left in the knee to just lift the butt off the seat of the saddle even at the trot.
The second lesson was to learn to ride with signficant weight carried on the stirrups at all times.
The third lesson was to move with the horse, if it leant over, then lean with it.
The rider sat upright and straight using the feet to compensate and resist the
Forces of gravity and movement by pressing down on the stirrups - which were almost being used as 'pedals'.

The rider leaned with the horse - if the horse went to the right at speed then the rider would lean over with the horse into the bend.

We always were to ride on a loose rein held in one hand only. The bits were all Western lever bits and we were told never to ride collected as the potential for accidental pressure on the horse's jaw was too great.

When we trotted - which was usually on level tarmac - we always posted.

If the weight was held on the stirrups, then the rider could not rise too high so long as the stirrups had been adjusted correctly for Western. The knee joint took the strain of rising to the trot.

The riding technique as described above was regarded as almost heresy by regular English riders trained by the British Horse Society. But it worked.
My horse would accept being ridden English or Western.

With hindsight it would be interesting to video a western rider posting and an English rider rising to the trot. If the camera were high speed and could be slowed down then the difference in posting and rising could be better understood. A high level English dressage rider might already know the difference.
     
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    02-26-2011, 08:06 PM
  #62
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
I can't speak for fictional characters on a show that ended 20 years before I was born but if you hire on to a big outfit here in the west (Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Wyoming) you will trot many, many miles and it won't be a slow jog...
By jog, I meant a comfortable trot. Trooper and Mia can both do a fast trot that moves quickly and burns up energy, but I would think that would tire them as quickly as a canter. Mia will also do a fake trot, where her feet are moving but she isn't...so to speak. She usually does it when she is annoyed with me, or when I tried to sit the trot but bounced the trot instead. Trooper can do a slow trot if he's feeling lazy and I let him, but his normal trot covers ground OK. Ask him for faster, and he'll go to a canter rather than push the trot up.

And I haven't ever worked on a ranch. Trooper has. I'm pretty new to riding, so I'm making some guesses. I don't know how one could really post when the legs are as long as the pictures I showed, although Barry Godden in post 61 says you can - sort of. Not quite the 'Jack-in-the-box' posting I associate with English riding...which isn't fair to English riders, I suppose, but it is what I see a lot of when driving past arenas with young English riders.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
I think all saddles should have the shape you are describing.....and I am a woman!...

...I can't speak from a man's point of view, but I ride western and ride with a REALLY long stirrup, like the old cowboy photos posted earlier, and I always sit the trot. Now if a horse is super fast and bumpy, I may stand in the stirrups a bit (and I'm practically already doing that) or rock a little with the motion (as a saddleseat rider taught me to do) but basically, I guess what I am saying, is that is how I ride too- with a long stirrup and sitting the trot. But I guess that's pretty irrelevant because I'm a girl.

Just because I enjoy showing it off, here is my favorite saddle- I think it has the perfect seat shape.
I like your saddle. I've seen a few like it, but none that would fit Trooper's very short back. That is my idea of what a western saddle should look like!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
Years ago I was taught to ride 'Western' by an old, bent bow legged Canadian cowboy who had been involved with horses since he was a kid...

...The first lesson was to adjust the stirrups so that the leg was carried almost straight. Enough bend was left in the knee to just lift the butt off the seat of the saddle even at the trot...

...The third lesson was to move with the horse, if it leant over, then lean with it. The rider sat upright and straight using the feet to compensate and resist the forces of gravity and movement by pressing down on the stirrups - which were almost being used as 'pedals'.

The rider leaned with the horse - if the horse went to the right at speed then the rider would lean over with the horse into the bend...
Interesting post. I pay for lessons for my daughter and daughter-in-law, so I'm learning by doing and listening. I did take some lessons 30 years ago in Utah, where an old ex-cowboy taught posting in a western saddle. However, he taught it with a shorter stirrup and with the heel under the hip. Almost every picture (90%) of cowboys I can find from the 1890-1930 period shows a position closer to what cutting riders use, at least from the hip down.

Here in southern AZ, the winds have picked up and the temperatures are dropping, so it will be Monday before I saddle up again and play around a bit more. Happily, my horses seem to be pretty forgiving - not a trait usually associated with Arabians.

BTW - there are hundreds of pictures from around 1910 at the web site below...it is a great place to look and think!

"Two cowboys working the herd on their cutting horses. Three Blocks Ranch, New Mexico, 1908-1909"



Erwin E. Smith Collection Guide | Collection Guide
     
    03-05-2011, 04:40 PM
  #63
Yearling
I am a guy, I ride western, and I post when I need to. That is the short answer. The long answer involves some of my history. I started riding western when I was about 8. I rode until I turned 16 or so. I got a car and joined the local FD and just kinda ran out of time. When I turned 20 I moved and got a side job at a hunter jumper barn for about 7 years. It was there that I started riding english but always loved the western stuff. I started riding 4 or 5 horses a day and learned alot. I still rode western when I could though. That is where I kinda strted to merge the 2 styles. Then I worked on the side at a trail riding place. I was on a horse 7-8 hours a day.( different horses throughput the day) I would say at least once a week I was asked by people that had never sat a horse. " How do you do this all day and not hurt the boys" I would tell them if it is hurting your boys try sitting back on your back pockets a bit more and move your hips with the horse. Their face would light up and all of a sudden they were comfortable. Now that was at a walk mostly but my point is , if you sit the horse correctly it will not hurt anything you may need later.
I now have a 4 yr old that I am training as a ranch horse for versitlity and I am starting a 3yrold. Now. I will sit them for awhile when riding and I will post. I want them to be used to both and it does save on some where and tear on the youngans backs. I do tend to ride with my stirrups kinda inbetween english and western lenght. Kinda leaning toward the western.
My wife is from Montana and rides dressage but she grew up ranching. That is why she rides dresssage. She had her fill of cowboying. That being said we go out there and go riding when we can. Most of the working cowboys I have met and rode with will post. It's easier on the horses and a good steady trot is the gate that a horse can cover the most ground in without running out of gas. Over a long peiod of time trotting posting is by far the most comfortable for the rider as well.
Just some opinions from the new guy.
     
    03-05-2011, 05:32 PM
  #64
Weanling
I prefer short stirrups and it is called rising trot here =P I hate sitting to the trot my balance is terrible.
     
    03-06-2011, 08:35 PM
  #65
Yearling
Typically in western you don't post.but some do (including me but not often. I prefer to just sit). But if your showing western pleasure you wont be asked to post
     
    03-06-2011, 08:50 PM
  #66
Super Moderator
Trailhorserider,

Love that western saddle. Who is the maker? That kind of flat seat is nice. It encourages you to be more vertical and have a bit more of a "three point seat". The ones, as you said, that rise steeply and directly from the cantle push the rider back onto the cantle, rolled back onto their tail bone more. Encourages a chair seat. Love your saddle!
     
    03-13-2011, 04:41 AM
  #67
Foal
I've been away from the forum for awhile and didn't realize how many of you responded with comments and opinions. Thanks everyone.

I will update. My hubby has found a Western Pleasure Coach to work with. His horse is WP trained so he will most likely be sitting the trot. His horse is very smooth on his gaits. Jealous of that...lol
     

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