proper western posture - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Western Riding

proper western posture

This is a discussion on proper western posture within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Correct western sturrup length for adults
  • Western riding

Like Tree157Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    02-18-2013, 05:45 PM
  #21
Green Broke
And just because I found it hilarious to see him critique himself



Quote:
George Morris
Very bad. Leg is pivoting on the knee. Look how straight it is. No angle in the knee or hip. Jumping ahead. Maybe I was showing that. Was I showing that? Are you sure? Is that my position over every jump? This is a very good example of bad. There's no angle in the knee because I've jumped so far ahead of the horse. My buttock is two feet out of the saddle. My leg is to the rear. My back is quite stiff. My god, I ride bad!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    02-18-2013, 06:16 PM
  #22
Showing
Unless you are planning to show in Western Equitation or some other class where your position is the thing being judged, then the "proper" western position is the one that best allows you to be balanced, fluid, and effective in your riding.

I've always had a bit of a chair seat and while different saddles will affect how severe it is, it's always there. BUT, that's how I'm best balanced with the horse. I've tried keeping my heels under my hips like a good rider "should", but that throws me off balance and makes me stiffen up. I am unsure whether that stiffness is due to lack of practice in that position or whether it might be because that is just the wrong position for my saddle, body, and discipline.

Either way, my weight stays on my seat bones...not my hip pockets, not my feet, I have independent hands and functional legs and seat. So, I figure if it ain't broke, don't try to fix it.


Lonestar22, COWCHICK77 and bsms like this.
     
    02-18-2013, 06:57 PM
  #23
Trained
I'm not sure this picture shows it, but here is a problem I have on the rare times I ride our Circle Y (on the Appy):



Not sure if you can see it, but there is a forward groove that this saddle forces my thigh into. In the picture below, you can see my 5'2" daughter riding in this 16" saddle. Part of the problem is that it is too big for her, but when I ride it, my thigh is forced into the same forward angle:



I find the saddle painful to ride. 30 minutes in it, and my hips start throbbing. It may be that I'm trying to ride my normal position, as in the Aussie saddle, and thus end up fighting the western saddle. I actually find a cheap Abetta more comfortable to ride than our Circle Y. I had a chance once to borrow a Wade saddle, and it also felt much better to ride in to me.

There is a good discussion here:
"On the other hand, the seat on a western saddle is built on top of the tree by the saddle maker. On a good saddle, they will add multiple layers of leather, sometimes including a tin layer, and then shape those layers to fit the rider. So what the rider feels is totally dependant on how the saddle maker builds his ground seat. The amount of rise built into the seat, how flat or curved it is, where the low spot where the rider's pin/seat bones will end up (because gravity still works), how wide it feels to the rider - all this is completely independent of the tree."


Saddle fit - Western compared to English Part 1

More good info here:

Proper position of a Western saddle

That is an additional part of the shape of the saddle with a western saddle that I don't notice, at least, on my Aussie-style saddle in the picture above.

For me, at least, I find western saddles affect my position more than my English (Bates) and Australian (DownUnder) saddles do. One saddle will make me feel like I was born in it, and the next will feel like a torture device!
smrobs likes this.
     
    02-18-2013, 07:09 PM
  #24
Yearling
I really appreciate the active discussion going on here! I'm not going to offer my responses just yet since I'm still sorting everything out and decided where I sit (pun intended lol), hence why I asked the question in the first place.

To offer some information about the demands placed on an endurance rider: Basically, we do what works. Your riding style isn't judged, so there's no real consistency. Plus, anyone can up and try it, so you get all types of saddles, gear, experiences, styles....etc.

Here's what IS consistent:
Your horse is mostly trotting, and, especially in my case, the horse is moving pretty big. Some level of posting/standing is necessary to keep your weight from coming down of your horse's back and to stay balanced as well (it's impossible to sit my horse's trot, nor should I be sitting it). As mentioned, standing for 50 miles would be nearly impossible, so posting is what I prefer to do over most of our miles, though I do stand occasionally either to stretch my legs a little or when we're doing a fast stretch (extended trot - I sit the canter) so that I can free him up to move (though I still need to be balanced so he can move well). Keeping the horse's back from getting sore is the goal, so I need to be as balanced as possible and do my job to make it easier for my horse to do his job over the many miles we cover.

I have a Big Horn endurance saddle, model 117, in case anyone wants to take that into account. However, my primary goal is to sit correctly, and if this ends up putting me in the wrong position, I would rather sell it and get a more fitting saddle than try to fight it or sit incorrectly.
     
    02-18-2013, 07:15 PM
  #25
Green Broke
I slightly disagree with George on this as I would rather the riders seat to be back a bit further as I find her crotch hovering over the pommel. However I can also see why he prefers it and id be silly to argue George Morris as my jumping coach would smack me lol. She is close friends with George and was actually his first student used for his book to demonstrate correct riding. So who am I to argue with God

Anyway I am thinking you are probably wanting something similar to this jilly



Quote:
Anne Kursinski
Here she's in a classic galloping seat. Anne is one the greatest advocates in the world of the forward seat. She's won the grand prix of Aachen, been to five Olympics, etc., etc., etc. You see her really relieve the horse's back. She's really standing up. The hind leg is super engaged, the croup is very low. Look how uphill this mare is galloping. Look how high the wither is. The poll is up, yet the face is close to the vertical, soft in the jaw. The throat angle is closed. That's a real galloping uphill, perfect balance of the horse position. For the rider, she's in a very racing seat--even past a galloping seat--which you also need to practice.
Now the above is a galloping seat but it is probably the closest to the more ideal position for endurance as its to get off the horses back and allow you the freedom to move with your horse over various terrain.

I am far from an endurance expert as I have never done an endurance ride. But I do long hours of conditioning rides to build my horses stamina for cross country. So it is fairly similar. I like to stay in a half seat when I am conditioning. It gives me the motion range to move with my horse without interfering with her.
northwesten likes this.
     
    02-18-2013, 07:26 PM
  #26
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by NBEventer    
Anyway I am thinking you are probably wanting something similar to this jilly





Now the above is a galloping seat but it is probably the closest to the more ideal position for endurance as its to get off the horses back and allow you the freedom to move with your horse over various terrain.

I am far from an endurance expert as I have never done an endurance ride. But I do long hours of conditioning rides to build my horses stamina for cross country. So it is fairly similar. I like to stay in a half seat when I am conditioning. It gives me the motion range to move with my horse without interfering with her.
This would be ideal in short spurts - such as racing for the finishing line, but it would KILL over distance! I need something that allows me sit in the saddle and post. Like I said before, there's really no "set" way of riding, except that preserves both you and your horse. Since the "chair" seat doesn't allow me to post without coming down hard on my horse's back, it won't be ideal. I'm thinking from what I know about the demands from endurance and what's been said here, I do need to strive for a correct heel/hip/shoulder/ear (?) alignment so that I can adjust my position as necessary but still stay balanced. In this I mean I can go from posting, to sitting a walk or canter, to lifting completely out of the saddle over fast stretches, to balancing myself up and down hills/mountains.
bsms and onuilmar like this.
     
    02-18-2013, 07:48 PM
  #27
Green Broke
Makes sense. I keep forgetting endurance is mostly trotting. Plus it is MUCH longer distances I do lol. I like half seat for hill work and canter/gallop stuff. For trotting I just do regular trot which is more of a pelvic tilt then a rise. A lot of people make the mistake of rising with rising trot. It should be more of a light movement forward and back to flow with the horses movement.
I love this video to describe the mechanics of a human riding the trot properly. It is also an excellent explanation about why chair seat/forward legs are bad for the horse (last part of that comment is for bsms)

Golden Horse likes this.
     
    02-18-2013, 07:52 PM
  #28
Foal
Shoulder, hips, heels!
     
    02-18-2013, 08:25 PM
  #29
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by jillybean19    
This would be ideal in short spurts - such as racing for the finishing line, but it would KILL over distance! I need something that allows me sit in the saddle and post. Like I said before, there's really no "set" way of riding, except that preserves both you and your horse. Since the "chair" seat doesn't allow me to post without coming down hard on my horse's back, it won't be ideal. I'm thinking from what I know about the demands from endurance and what's been said here, I do need to strive for a correct heel/hip/shoulder/ear (?) alignment so that I can adjust my position as necessary but still stay balanced. In this I mean I can go from posting, to sitting a walk or canter, to lifting completely out of the saddle over fast stretches, to balancing myself up and down hills/mountains.
I rode like this for about an hour in a hunter pace one time..... I couldn't even sit down on the toilet bowel without plopping down on it. Forget stairs, riding, or anything like that!
     
    02-18-2013, 08:32 PM
  #30
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlideStop    
I rode like this for about an hour in a hunter pace one time..... I couldn't even sit down on the toilet bowel without plopping down on it. Forget stairs, riding, or anything like that!
Bahaha! Had the same toilet bowl issues myself a time or two!!
smrobs and fkcb1988 like this.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bad...bad posture.. :S Dreamcatcher5 Horse Riding Critique 4 01-25-2013 05:29 AM
Is it just really bad posture? VT Trail Trotters General Off Topic Discussion 13 04-26-2012 10:12 PM
what is the proper way to measure your horse for a western saddle? allisonjoy Horse Tack and Equipment 2 11-11-2011 10:34 AM
My Posture Pidge Horse Riding Critique 5 08-09-2011 11:04 AM
Proper Bareback Posture Tyler Horse Riding 15 04-03-2010 07:20 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0