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proper western posture

This is a discussion on proper western posture within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        02-19-2013, 02:47 PM
      #61
    Yearling
    I don't ever do a rising trot for anything. :-/ My app has a big extended trot and I don't post on him. If I post on him he will come to a dead hault and sling more forward. I have never posted on any horse I have ever owned or rode.
         
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        02-19-2013, 02:51 PM
      #62
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by toosexy4myspotz    
    I don't ever do a rising trot for anything. :-/ My app has a big extended trot and I don't post on him. If I post on him he will come to a dead hault and sling more forward. I have never posted on any horse I have ever owned or rode.
    Never?
         
        02-19-2013, 03:00 PM
      #63
    Yearling
    Never...Somebody once told me to pretend that my body was like the water rippling around rocks and to just let my hips and back "ripple" with the horse. I never had lessons growing up or anything. I was 13yo and handed a 2 yo quarter pony mare and was told to train her. I didnt know anything about techniques or proper way. I always kept what that guy told me stuck in my head and that's the way I ride a horse. I never put any weight in my stirrups (galloping is the only exception). I just sit back and let my body absorb all the movement. I have a bad back. My L4 vertebrea cause a lot of issues with my sciatic nerve but as long as I can ride 3-4 times a week it never bothers me. Its hard to set back and just absorb all the shock coming threw a horses body from movement but I can go months without riding, hope in the saddle and ride ten hours and never ever get off a horse sore. I have never been sore after riding. I don't hold my body is specific form. I keep my shoulders back, soft arms, and a very flexible back. My only issue is I do loose my stirrups, a lot. I hate stirrups to begin with and could care less if they are on my saddle but I keep my stirrups long but with any kind of movement other than a walk I do bend at my knees more.
    bsms likes this.
         
        02-19-2013, 03:01 PM
      #64
    Trained
    There was a thread on HF a few years back on posting and western riding. It seemed about 50:50 split, and regional. In some places, almost everyone said they posted. In others, almost no one did.

    If your feet are forward as in the pictures of 1900's cowboys, then posting would be almost impossible. It isn't entirely...I played around with it and you can sort of post, but that style of riding doesn't mix well with posting.

    Recreational riders are any riders who don't NEED to ride a horse to get their job done. The large majority of current riders in the US are recreational. Ranches are the primary area of non-recreational riding left. If you do horse sports, you are a recreational rider. If you are an instructor of recreational riders, you are largely a product of recreational riding.

    It isn't an insult. However, it is a bit insulting to those who rode many thousands of miles in rough country or in combat to suggest that they were incompetent riders. Please notice that I've attacked NO ONE. I have not said ANY style of riding is mandatory. I have merely said there is more than one effective way to ride a horse, and that a vertical line from shoulder to hip to heel is NOT a requirement for all good riding.

    Perhaps those who haven't tried riding like an old time cowboy should refrain from attacking that style - as I have refrained from attacking ANY modern style, including WP, dressage, jump, etc. The very fact that many men used that style over many years, riding horses in rough terrain, and over distances much greater than most modern riders attempt, suggests it IS a valid approach to riding. Not the ONLY one, but A style.
         
        02-19-2013, 03:05 PM
      #65
    Foal
    From Xenophon (c. 430 – 354 BC). : A recognized riding master from Ancient Greece and followed in most military riding schools from the medieval era until today.

    Eventing descends from modern era military cavalry training and cowboy riding clearly comes from Civil War cavalry training.

    On Horsemanship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "...When mounted, the rider should sit on the horse not as if he were sitting in a chair, but as if he were standing with his legs apart. This will allow him to hold on with his thighs, and the upright position will allow him to throw a javelin with greater power. The lower legs should hang loosely from the knee, as a stiff leg is more likely to break should it collide with an obstacle. The rider's body above his hips should be supple, as he will be able to move more easily when fighting and will be less likely to be unseated if he is shoved. The left arm of the rider should be held against his side, giving him the greatest freedom and the firmest hold of the reins. It is interesting to note that this position is still considered the classically correct way to sit on a horse, regardless of the type of riding performed...."

    The bolding is mine.
         
        02-19-2013, 03:07 PM
      #66
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    There was a thread on HF a few years back on posting and western riding. It seemed about 50:50 split, and regional. In some places, almost everyone said they posted. In others, almost no one did.

    If your feet are forward as in the pictures of 1900's cowboys, then posting would be almost impossible. It isn't entirely...I played around with it and you can sort of post, but that style of riding doesn't mix well with posting.

    Recreational riders are any riders who don't NEED to ride a horse to get their job done. The large majority of current riders in the US are recreational. Ranches are the primary area of non-recreational riding left. If you do horse sports, you are a recreational rider. If you are an instructor of recreational riders, you are largely a product of recreational riding.

    It isn't an insult. However, it is a bit insulting to those who rode many thousands of miles in rough country or in combat to suggest that they were incompetent riders. Please notice that I've attacked NO ONE. I have not said ANY style of riding is mandatory. I have merely said there is more than one effective way to ride a horse, and that a vertical line from shoulder to hip to heel is NOT a requirement for all good riding.

    Perhaps those who haven't tried riding like an old time cowboy should refrain from attacking that style - as I have refrained from attacking ANY modern style, including WP, dressage, jump, etc. The very fact that many men used that style over many years, riding horses in rough terrain, and over distances much greater than most modern riders attempt, suggests it IS a valid approach to riding. Not the ONLY one, but A style.
    Recreational riders are riders who ride as a hobby. Again, nothing wrong with it. But there is a reason you get titled pro once you start getting paid for riding and coaching. You can no longer claim amateur status once you recieve money for riding/coaching.

    Also I stand behind what studies have proven. You show me valid proof that riding with legs pitched forward is not creating pain for a horse and I might give it a second though. However in the mean time I will stand behind what has been proven through multiple studies.
         
        02-19-2013, 03:08 PM
      #67
    Yearling
    Well its easy to sit a jog, I will give it that much trotting is different though because its up down up down. I can't explain how to sit it other than if you have a horse that you really trust, get on them with lengthened stirrups, don't keep your heels right under your hip. Keep them slightly forward. Ask your horse to trot, a good extended trot. Lay your reins down and let your arms dangly by your hips. Close your eyes and forget everything. Just "sit" don't focus on sitting or you will be bouncing around. Just relax, breath and keep your eyes clothes. It works great
         
        02-19-2013, 03:24 PM
      #68
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    I love the arrogance of the modern recreational rider.

    1 - Cowboy or Cavalry, you could go thru 1000 photos before finding someone who DIDN'T ride that was. You can't claim that those pictures are of idiots, unless you assume every professional rider in that day was an idiot.

    2 - The cavalry regularly covered 40 miles/day, 3-4 days in a row, and had to arrive with their horses fresh enough to charge into battle - where losing meant you died. The cowboys of that day didn't have anyone to call on their cell phone for a medivac. They covered a lot of miles - a lot more than the vast majority of recreational riders.

    Yet they weren't TRUE western riders. True western riding was only discovered in the 70s, when people started spending more time riding in arenas than at work.

    Mind you, I am not criticizing anyone who wants to ride with shoulder - hip - heel in a vertical line. They can if they want. WP isn't my thing, but I figure if they are happy, then I'll be happy for them. But below are two pictures, both previously posted on this thread. Which of the two is WORKING on their horse? I'm willing to call BOTH OF THEM real western riders...but if you could only choose one, which would you choose?





    If you tell me the top one...OK. But I'm not buying it.

    The forward seat became prevalent in jumping about the time that jumping became a competition. Before that, it was mostly something you did sometimes going from A to B. In much of the western US, jumping a 5 foot fence isn't very smart. It would be a good way to kill your horse.

    However, a forward seat has always been used for racing. There are statues of Greeks 400 BC using a forward seat - when racing.

    But if you want to tell me that the US Cavalry & all the cowboys of 1860 to the modern era were incompetent riders...I ain't buying that either. I don't believe that REAL riding developed about the same time most riders began riding recreationally instead of purposefully.

    If y'all want to attack anyone who rides like this:



    I cannot stop you. After all, if someone can look at an English saddle and a western one, and not notice any difference...well, they're beyond any advice I can give! And let's face it: Craig Cameron sucks at riding. He's just another idiot...

    Craig Cameron Explains How To Ride The Canter On the Equicizer & Horse - YouTube
    I agree with this whole heartedly, and heres why:

    I was trained to ride jumpers/dressage. Leg position was very important and I know why. I liked jumpers over hunters, and heres why:

    Do you want pretty or do you want effective?

    In jumpers, no one cares what you look like. If you clear the round with the fastest time, you win. Ugliness aside. Its function that matters the most. You have to have a good BASE training in order to survive it and do it WELL. But do you need to look pretty? No.

    Fox hunting as well. You need good training under your belt to literally SURVIVE some of those runs. But do you need to look pretty? No. One interviewer said that she didn't care how I looked over the jump, as long as it was functional.

    Do you need to look pretty in other english events? Yes, if you want to place. However, jumping and foxhunting are two examples on how you can remained balanced without constant alignment.

    Western is the same way. On animals who don't quite "work", leg alignment is ideal. WP - you're on a horse who doesn't move. You can pay a lot of attention to where your seat and leg are. For cutters, ropers, etc., leg alignment is the LAST thing you are thinking about. You and your horse are preforming two separate tasks as individuals to accomplish one goal.

    You want pretty, stick to the hunters and stick to wp. You want effective, it'll be balls-to-the-walls to get the job done. As long as you have a good BASE in balance and a good communication level flowing between you and your horse, your leg can fly around a little.

    I understand the mechanics of leg alignment and know its uses. I have used it in dressage. But believe me, when the job needs done and it needs done now, that leg is going to move and you're not going to care.

    Also, reiners don't trot.
         
        02-19-2013, 03:28 PM
      #69
    Banned
    Reiners in training sure do trot......in the show pen no, it's not required.....but I could bet you my bottom dollar all the top reining trainers trot their horses out, posting....all the time.
    COWCHICK77 likes this.
         
        02-19-2013, 03:30 PM
      #70
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Copperhead    
    Do you want pretty or do you want effective?

    I ride to be effective, and that means leg alignment. I could care less about being pretty. But effectiveness goes back to form, and (unfortunately) there are those who focus on the beauty contest aspect.

    I practice dressage (and notice I said 'practice') to stay safe. I started riding at 48. Believe me, I am about being safe while doing crazy (and my husband thinks I'm crazy going over jumps.) Hunter is the jumping end of pretty; eventing is about getting there.

    But guess what, eventing (not hunter) focuses on dressage as well to control the horse and be effective.

    That's me.
    Golden Horse likes this.
         

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