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This is a discussion on Ranch Jobs within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Ranch feedlot horses
  • Ranch and feedlot rider jobs

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    12-05-2011, 06:19 PM
  #21
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcb5040    
Smrobs, it would be in seguin, tx right outside of San Antonio
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We are wintering in Texas about 4 hrs NE of there. I think Smrobs is up in the panhandle.
     
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    12-05-2011, 06:45 PM
  #22
Showing
Yeah, I am. It's too bad that TX is so big LOL, you could cross across 5 other states in less distance than it takes to get from north to south here .
     
    12-05-2011, 06:54 PM
  #23
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Yeah, I am. It's too bad that TX is so big LOL, you could cross across 5 other states in less distance than it takes to get from north to south here .
LOL! Boy isn't that the truth! You have to drive a day to get somewhere so can go somewhere!
     
    12-05-2011, 10:57 PM
  #24
Foal
My sister took the ranch and feedlot rider course up at Lakeland, frankly if they had been running it for sure the year I applied I would of taken it too. You basically take a green colt and turn em into a finished cowhorse. Learn about handling, roping, dseases, etc. Very good course, I know feedlots and pastures have requests to get graduates out of this program.
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    12-06-2011, 11:32 PM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
Since you have already said that you are always learning and looking to keep doing so... you have beat a hundred other guys in your same position. It is a good attitude to have.

If you want to do ranch work, I would not do the dude wrangling... your better off working in a feedlot. This way you can learn cattle. Even if you work at a feedlot where they don't rope(which most don't anymore) you learn to work, sort, class, and detect sickness. Which is the main reason to be a cowman/cowboy....if it wasn't for cattle and taking care of them, who needs a cowboy!!!!!!
\

I've been wondering about how to get into making a living a-horseback. Is there a customary way to go about it? What I mean is, is it better to have someone vouch for you? Drive up to the ranch HQ? Show up at the feedlot with your horses? Hang around the feed store and keep asking?

I don't know the way things are done but I'm very interested.
     
    12-06-2011, 11:58 PM
  #26
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian McDonald    
\

I've been wondering about how to get into making a living a-horseback. Is there a customary way to go about it? What I mean is, is it better to have someone vouch for you? Drive up to the ranch HQ? Show up at the feedlot with your horses? Hang around the feed store and keep asking?

I don't know the way things are done but I'm very interested.
It used to be just showing up with your bedroll. But now it is more customary to make some phone calls. If you have worked for anyone get them to vouch for you. Like I said before, look in the Western Livestock Journal and the Capital Press for jobs. You might have to start out at a sale barn for one day a month unloaded cows off of trucks at 2am but it is a start. Or work a feedyard that doesn't rope to doctor. I hate to say this but you can learn about cattle health from working on a dairy, however sometimes it is hard to make the transition from dairy to beef cattle. I got my start cowboying from starting colts. This one is tricky though. I am a girl so having a girl stomping broncs is not going to fly.lol! So I got put on the regular cowboy crew and not just stuck to starting colts, which if your the new guy, young and know anything about-you get stuck with. So I lucked out, however still stuck with some tough horses.
     
    12-07-2011, 12:28 AM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
It used to be just showing up with your bedroll. But now it is more customary to make some phone calls. If you have worked for anyone get them to vouch for you. Like I said before, look in the Western Livestock Journal and the Capital Press for jobs. You might have to start out at a sale barn for one day a month unloaded cows off of trucks at 2am but it is a start. Or work a feedyard that doesn't rope to doctor. I hate to say this but you can learn about cattle health from working on a dairy, however sometimes it is hard to make the transition from dairy to beef cattle. I got my start cowboying from starting colts. This one is tricky though. I am a girl so having a girl stomping broncs is not going to fly.lol! So I got put on the regular cowboy crew and not just stuck to starting colts, which if your the new guy, young and know anything about-you get stuck with. So I lucked out, however still stuck with some tough horses.
Starting colts actually sounds kind of fun. Any advice on getting that kind of gig?
     
    12-07-2011, 01:07 AM
  #28
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian McDonald    
Starting colts actually sounds kind of fun. Any advice on getting that kind of gig?
I am not sure I can give you sound advice on that one. I started out in high school starting Mustangs off the desert and I did a little day work working for the neighbors when they needed help working pairs. Later I did traded saddle horses at the sale barn, granted this was back when the market was good. I ended up partnering on horses with a family who owned a sale barn, who introduced me to a guy who was a NFR team roper and APHA western pleasure trainer(the same trainer I jockeyed race mules with, weird, I know) Later it lead me to a reining horse trainer,then a cutting horse trainer, then a cowhorse trainer...I just kept moving up with the caliber of trainers, and in between all of this cowboying. I may have not worked for these trainers for very long but it was enough to gain a little bit of knowledge. And when I worked for someone I worked hard.

You might have to start out doing something off the wall(like jockeying race mules, I still have my jockey license.lol) but you will always meet someone that knows someone. And if you always work hard and are willing to learn- people will recommend you for a job. You might have to starve a little too. There was a time when I could barely afford the dollar menu and a crappy motel room a couple times a week to shower. It just depends how bad you are willing to work for it.

I am sure there are easier ways, because I always do things the hard way! Lol!
     
    12-07-2011, 09:36 AM
  #29
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
I am not sure I can give you sound advice on that one. I started out in high school starting Mustangs off the desert and I did a little day work working for the neighbors when they needed help working pairs. Later I did traded saddle horses at the sale barn, granted this was back when the market was good. I ended up partnering on horses with a family who owned a sale barn, who introduced me to a guy who was a NFR team roper and APHA western pleasure trainer(the same trainer I jockeyed race mules with, weird, I know) Later it lead me to a reining horse trainer,then a cutting horse trainer, then a cowhorse trainer...I just kept moving up with the caliber of trainers, and in between all of this cowboying. I may have not worked for these trainers for very long but it was enough to gain a little bit of knowledge. And when I worked for someone I worked hard.

You might have to start out doing something off the wall(like jockeying race mules, I still have my jockey license.lol) but you will always meet someone that knows someone. And if you always work hard and are willing to learn- people will recommend you for a job. You might have to starve a little too. There was a time when I could barely afford the dollar menu and a crappy motel room a couple times a week to shower. It just depends how bad you are willing to work for it.

I am sure there are easier ways, because I always do things the hard way! Lol!
You appear to be a woman after my own heart

I can dig what you're sayin though. I consider myself at the moment to be a trainer of trail horses for hobby riders to use but I have aspirations of makin a hand one of these days. My generally itinerant nature lends itself to that kind of life anyway
     
    12-07-2011, 09:42 AM
  #30
Trained
I know a couple of grazing associations that will be hiring this spring. The jobs only go from June till October but it's straight cowboy work. No fencing and no water hauling. P.M. If your interested.
     

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