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Scared of my bit(s)

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        10-01-2012, 11:34 AM
      #21
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    If his 'stop is so responsive he might be a lot more settled in a milder bit like a snaffle and you might worry less about knocking him in the mouth and relax more yourself.
    A horse that's well trained to leg & body cues shouldn't need excessive braking gear and will usually go forwards at lot better too
    Yes, he's really responsive to leg and seat, he's not terribly relaxed, but that might be my lack of subtlety! When I whoa him I don't haul on his face, but I do pick him up if he dropped a shoulder or what not.....
    I've ridden plenty of horses, but not one quite so well trained and I think I need to start riding him with a little less leg, rein (neck rein) and seat contact, because I think he is responding in tune with my cue, but I think my cues are just a little to obvious! Does that make sense? I sometimes think riding a well trained horse is harder than riding a not so well trained horse! The horse knows more than me!
         
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        10-01-2012, 11:55 AM
      #22
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
    Yes, he's really responsive to leg and seat, he's not terribly relaxed, but that might be my lack of subtlety! When I whoa him I don't haul on his face, but I do pick him up if he dropped a shoulder or what not.....
    I've ridden plenty of horses, but not one quite so well trained and I think I need to start riding him with a little less leg, rein (neck rein) and seat contact, because I think he is responding in tune with my cue, but I think my cues are just a little to obvious! Does that make sense? I sometimes think riding a well trained horse is harder than riding a not so well trained horse! The horse knows more than me!
    I know exactly what you mean and I've seen a lot of people intimidated by a really well trained horse. My oldest mare is so light to all cues that she would be dangerous to anyone that was too heavy with their hands or legs - she would respond by rearing and getting really fractious, prancing on the spot like a bomb ready to explode!!
    I know nothing about reining (or anything else western for that matter!!) but I did a lot of mounted games at top level as a child/teenager and those ponies have to be super fast and sharp to stop and turn but have to be ridden in a snaffle by rules.
    I have taken horses straight from extreme leverage bits into snaffles with no problem if they have light mouths and not hardened by being hauled around by some idiot - the only thing I have noticed is that a horse that 'backs off' from a sharper bit may feel inclined to lean on a thick mild one when it realises that it can so for me a thinner snaffle works best
    I understood that your daughter was going to have to ride in a snaffle so it might be easier for the horse - to avoid confusion with 2 very different sorts of control that you both rode him in the same bit??????
         
        10-01-2012, 02:25 PM
      #23
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    I know exactly what you mean and I've seen a lot of people intimidated by a really well trained horse. My oldest mare is so light to all cues that she would be dangerous to anyone that was too heavy with their hands or legs - she would respond by rearing and getting really fractious, prancing on the spot like a bomb ready to explode!!
    I know nothing about reining (or anything else western for that matter!!) but I did a lot of mounted games at top level as a child/teenager and those ponies have to be super fast and sharp to stop and turn but have to be ridden in a snaffle by rules.
    I have taken horses straight from extreme leverage bits into snaffles with no problem if they have light mouths and not hardened by being hauled around by some idiot - the only thing I have noticed is that a horse that 'backs off' from a sharper bit may feel inclined to lean on a thick mild one when it realises that it can so for me a thinner snaffle works best
    I understood that your daughter was going to have to ride in a snaffle so it might be easier for the horse - to avoid confusion with 2 very different sorts of control that you both rode him in the same bit??????
    Yes, I will try him out in a snaffle after I get him settled and myself settled on him, ie. Finding all his buttons you might say.....My daughter is not ready to ride him yet, she has to learn a few other things first.....like mucking out and grooming so she can get a little more relaxed around him....
    I am for sure over cueing him, I forget that he has been shown in one hand.....I keep thinking I have to set him up in a big way for a lope departure etc, you know, hip in etc....really all I have to do is slightly push his hip in and kiss to him....no tipping his nose out, because he gets all confused! So I am the problem! Not the horse......I'm just going to do the less is more route from now on!
         
        10-01-2012, 09:55 PM
      #24
    Banned
    Great news! I tried a new saddle on my guy today (full bars) as I knew something was off with the sizing of the other 5 or so saddles I tried! And he was as smooth and awesome as I knew he could be!!! YAY!
    Making progress! No rushing, just cool and cruisy! Thank goodness for that!!
         

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