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spur advice??

This is a discussion on spur advice?? within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Dutton spurs
  • Dutton 1" black ranch roper spurs

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    07-30-2012, 01:01 PM
  #11
Green Broke
You can use spurs to lighten your cues, as long your not using them to make him go faster and careful about not constantly bumping him when you ride. Otherwise he will continue to get duller.

You would use them in a progression of cues, using the spur as a last resort. So you would use your foot/calf, then if he didn't listen you might get louder with you foot/calf and still no response then you might gently roll your rowel up his rib. As soon as he moves off your leg you quit spurring. Soon he will figure out that if he listens to your foot/leg then the spur isn't needed. Roll your rowels don't jab at him, this causes swishing tails.

As for the style of spur need depends on you and your horse. If you are long legged a gooseneck might be helpful to reach the side of your horse. Or if your shortlegged and ride a big barreled horse a drop shank might help you keep out of his sides.
The rowel will also depend. The more points on the rowel, the easier they are. Maybe since you are starting out, maybe try a coin rowel or one with plenty of points.
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    07-30-2012, 01:10 PM
  #12
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
You can use spurs to lighten your cues, as long your not using them to make him go faster and careful about not constantly bumping him when you ride. Otherwise he will continue to get duller.

You would use them in a progression of cues, using the spur as a last resort. So you would use your foot/calf, then if he didn't listen you might get louder with you foot/calf and still no response then you might gently roll your rowel up his rib. As soon as he moves off your leg you quit spurring. Soon he will figure out that if he listens to your foot/leg then the spur isn't needed. Roll your rowels don't jab at him, this causes swishing tails.

As for the style of spur need depends on you and your horse. If you are long legged a gooseneck might be helpful to reach the side of your horse. Or if your shortlegged and ride a big barreled horse a drop shank might help you keep out of his sides.
The rowel will also depend. The more points on the rowel, the easier they are. Maybe since you are starting out, maybe try a coin rowel or one with plenty of points.

Thanks cowchick this is very helpful :)
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    07-30-2012, 05:50 PM
  #13
Green Broke
Pulling them apart doesnt help, the you shape at the heal is too small, Id have to pull them way apart which totally screws the angle, then lay them on a round post and hammer them back around to get a wider curve shape, way more hassle than Its worth. Especially since I have pretty much quit riding a horse that needed them.
     
    08-01-2012, 01:44 PM
  #14
Foal
I agree with Cowchick77. Spurs are a communication device, not a disciplinary tool. I have two different types. I use a pretty hefty "cowboy spur" for my older gelding. I rarely have to give him a jag but it's there if I need it. And after so many years it's nothing more than an extension of my heel.

However, my mare takes a much lighter touch. I use a mild bumper spur with her.

A lot depends too on how you're built and how your horse is built. Sometimes a spur simply assists you to reach around your horses frame more comfortably.

Experiment in a confined space until you know how your horse will react to different pressure. Start soft and firm up slowly. Some horses can just get mad and that's a wreck.
     
    08-01-2012, 02:08 PM
  #15
Started
To kinda help here is an old picture of me riding him without the trainer like 3 years ago. So you can see leg positioning vs his barrel. (no critiqing(sp) since all of his tack has been changed and so has my riding style.) its only to help visual see where my leg generally is minus the lowered heel since this pic isn't showing it.

He is around 15.2-16h... never fully measured but somewhere between there. He is narrow like a arab/tb but has a stockier look about him.

     
    08-01-2012, 02:26 PM
  #16
Foal
He's a beauty! I'm no expert so please check this with your local experts. It looks to me like your leg is actually hitting him right where he should be sensitive to your cues. So I'm thinking maybe a little reinforcement from a mild spur to just let him know you mean business? I'll bet if used correctly he gets the idea fast.
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    08-01-2012, 07:17 PM
  #17
Green Broke
I would go with a very short drop shank, like a team roper spur so you can keep out of sides. The more you accidently bump on him with them the more he will start to ignore you.
Maybe something similar to these to give you an idea...
DUTTON BITS - Dutton 5/8" Black Short Go Spurs - NRSworld.com
Posted via Mobile Device
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    08-02-2012, 05:49 PM
  #18
Started
Thank you for the guidance everyone :)
     
    08-03-2012, 10:41 PM
  #19
Foal
I found to resize spurs for my large foot and boot is to put them in a vise in the shop or bar and find a length of pipe.

Wrap the side of the spur in a good rag or towel to prevent marring then using a piece of pipe slip over the other side and GENTLY pull them apart.

As far as what to use the roper spur idea was probably the best to start out with, once you get refined the longer shanked will minimize movements or in the case of mine I can reach under the belly for more cues.

If you can't find one to fit you may try a man's spur and instead of spreading it you may have to close it in a similar manner.
     
    08-06-2012, 11:19 AM
  #20
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
I would go with a very short drop shank, like a team roper spur so you can keep out of sides. The more you accidently bump on him with them the more he will start to ignore you.
Maybe something similar to these to give you an idea...
DUTTON BITS - Dutton 5/8" Black Short Go Spurs - NRSworld.com
Posted via Mobile Device
that link pretty much shows the exact spur I used just it was silver not that rusty looking color. And using it was fantastic.

We didnt use it for forward motion but for helping he realize where the pressure is really coming from to move his hind/shoulders to get is ribs out of the way. Eventually we will progress to other things :P

Thanks cowchick for your help :)
     

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