Stiff/Disengaged Hindquarters
 
 

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Stiff/Disengaged Hindquarters

This is a discussion on Stiff/Disengaged Hindquarters within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Stiff over horses hindquarters
  • Stiff joints in horses western pleasure

 
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    01-01-2011, 05:56 AM
  #1
Yearling
Stiff/Disengaged Hindquarters

I was watching some videos of me riding Lena, and I noticed that she looks stiff or disengaged in her hindquarters. While loping, her front legs have big movement, but her back legs just drag along behind them.

Does anyone have any good exercises or ways to get her engaging her hindquarters?
I could post a video too, if that would be helpful.
Thanks!
     
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    01-01-2011, 12:02 PM
  #2
Foal
First of all: LOTS OF BACKING! Back around the arena, various directions for a total of 5-10 minutes throughout your workout, not all at once, spread out. That will require her to get her bum moving and build up those muscles. :) I would also suggest doing some pivots and sidepassing as well.
     
    01-01-2011, 05:00 PM
  #3
Yearling
Quote:
First of all: LOTS OF BACKING! Back around the arena, various directions for a total of 5-10 minutes throughout your workout, not all at once, spread out. That will require her to get her bum moving and build up those muscles. :) I would also suggest doing some pivots and sidepassing as well.
Thank you! We never do much of those three things, so that must be the problem! Also that she is quite lazy haha :) Thank you so much!
     
    01-01-2011, 05:46 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by horseluver50    
Thank you! We never do much of those three things, so that must be the problem! Also that she is quite lazy haha :) Thank you so much!
Oh no problem at all! I would also suggest if you are ever interested in some other exercises to look at renting/buying Mark Shaffer's Mechanics N Motion. He has a lot of great exercises and demonstrates them all. :) I use them all the time on the gelding I started working with this summer and they have helped a lot!
     
    01-01-2011, 06:13 PM
  #5
Weanling
Video??? He could be sore, under muscled, or lame. How old is he and what type of work has he done? Did this just come up? Has he been regularly ridden?
     
    01-01-2011, 08:24 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
I am wondering if you are trying to hold the horse's head down in a "frame"? If the horse's head is held down and behind the vertical , then it becomes hard for it to step under. Even "Long and Low" riding, used in dressage training, has the horse stretching its' head forward and outward, not coming behind the veritcal/bit.
So, I would open the horse out forward, encourage it to let its' head come forward, and put some energy into his hind end. Don't lope, gallop. Free him up and move him out, and don't worry abou the head. Really go for a bit, and when you come back to a lope, if the horse starts to drop behind the bit , push him up faster again.
I am NOT a fan of Mark Shaffer and to be honest, I watched several videos of his training and found that the beautiful sorrel mare he was working on moved better in the early part of the training than after him working on her for months. Think that will start a firestorm?
It's always a huge debate, the whole Western Pleasure headset and funky moving stuff.
     
    01-01-2011, 11:52 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
I am NOT a fan of Mark Shaffer and to be honest, I watched several videos of his training and found that the beautiful sorrel mare he was working on moved better in the early part of the training than after him working on her for months. Think that will start a firestorm?
It's always a huge debate, the whole Western Pleasure headset and funky moving stuff.
You are right, it is a debate and one that I do not one to start by any means. All I can suggest is to watch the videos with an open mind. He has some great exercises. If you don't want your horse in this type of frame/way of going that's fine. I know me and my gelding to HUS and that requires a longer frame and we still benefit from the exercises. But it is something to consider that he knows what the show world wants when it comes to western pleasure horses, being as he has had over 100 championship winnings. But again that is the show world and quite different maybe what you may want to do.

Bah, backing up, pivots, and sidepassing. :P It should help. Hahahaha. Let me know how Lena does for you! Good luck!!!
     
    01-11-2011, 09:41 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
video??? He could be sore, under muscled, or lame. How old is he and what type of work has he done? Did this just come up? Has he been regularly ridden?
I will upload the video in a little bit. She does have soreness issues, but in her front legs. Wear and tear in her front joints from reining. She is 14 years old. No, she's been like this for a year (as long as I've owned her) Yep, she is ridden 5-6 days a week in the summer.

Quote:
I am wondering if you are trying to hold the horse's head down in a "frame"? If the horse's head is held down and behind the vertical , then it becomes hard for it to step under. Even "Long and Low" riding, used in dressage training, has the horse stretching its' head forward and outward, not coming behind the veritcal/bit.
So, I would open the horse out forward, encourage it to let its' head come forward, and put some energy into his hind end. Don't lope, gallop. Free him up and move him out, and don't worry abou the head. Really go for a bit, and when you come back to a lope, if the horse starts to drop behind the bit , push him up faster again.
I think that actually might be the problem! My trainer, who focusses in dressage, is always getting me to have contact on her mouth and get her bending. She kept falling apart when I held onto her... and when I rode by myself I let her have a loose rein and she went along so much better.
     
    01-11-2011, 10:45 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
It isn't so much that the horse has or hasn't contact, but whether the horse is reacting to that by coming behind the vertical, kind of tucking behind the bit. Doing this really does put the horse harder on to the forehand.

If the mare has been ridden most of her life on a loose rein, she will be resentful of contstant contact. I think one has to make the transition slowly.
Also, in a dressage type working frame, you would need her to step withl a lot more energy and umph from behind than she is used to, too. In fact, without that extra push from behind, if you put contact on the bit without adding drive, you only shut the horse down more and put more weight onto the shoulder and forehand.
Does this get tiresome to you, hearing all this dressage talk that may or may not make sense at this time? I can imagine.
Do post the video as they speak volumes.
     
    01-11-2011, 11:09 PM
  #10
Yearling
^^ I am actually taking western lessons on her. With a curb bit, when I was supposed to have constant contact. I am just going to do western for myself from now on, or go to a training who only does reining or western pleasure. I will use my trainer for english lessons though.

I will get the video up soon!
     

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