Teaching to neck rein..?? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 07:34 PM Thread Starter
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Question Teaching to neck rein..??

Not sure if this should be in horse training or not, because it is western riding as well. So it can be moved if it is not in the right spot!

SO, I was wondering where you start with teaching a horse how to neck rein. My lease mare Candy direct reins. We show western, and do all the fun stuff like barrels and poles, and key hole ect; ect. She knows most of the patterns pretty well, but going around the barrels and not being able to hold onto the horn for that short time going around the barrel quick is sometimes hard. (sorry if that made NO sense!)

Like for this split second right here...


So I wanna know, what do you do to train a horse to neck rein?!

Thanks in advance!

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post #2 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 07:44 PM
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I may be an english rider, but i feel i would also benefit from knowing how to teach my mare to respond to the in-direct rein aid.
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post #3 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 07:54 PM
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Same, I'm attempting to teach my mare to neck-rein. it's not going all that great, but we're getting there. It's sure going to be interesting at Fair.

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post #4 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 07:57 PM
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I'm currently teaching my mare to neck rein and it really isn't all that hard. What's been making it easy for me is that Lacey moves off of my legs really really well so I just combined leg cues with putting the rein on her neck like you do when you neck rein. She caught on to that pretty quickly so I've stopped using leg cues and just use the reins. If she needs a little help I'll gently direct rein her in the direction I want to to go while keeping the rein on her neck.
I hope that makes sense... It sounded less confusing in my head. Haha

I plan on returning to leg cues once she totally understands neck reining but I want her to be completely reliable at neck reining with no leg cues necessary unless she needs a little clarification.

She's almost there after only a few weeks, she's great at turning to the left but she's having more difficulty with right turns, but it'll come eventually.

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post #5 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 07:58 PM
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The have been many threads about neck reining that you can search on, but this is how I trained our mares....

For example, to turn left, you want your horse to respond to the feel of the right rein on the right side of the neck, so I start the left turn with the right rein on the neck and a little direct left rein, reinforcing with a little left leg, if needed. Once they make the association, you can just drop the direct reining/leg.

Our young mares all picked this up very quickly this way.

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post #6 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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Painthorse, Thats how i am starting to do it! she seems to understand it more and more everytime I use this method, but im just not consistent with it. I use direct rein more then I use this method if that makes any sense.

Wallaby, You have only been working on this for a few weeks??! thats awesome!

My mare is 19 if that makes any differece. But she acts like she is 4

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post #7 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Jillyann View Post
Wallaby, You have only been working on this for a few weeks??! thats awesome!

My mare is 19 if that makes any differece. But she acts like she is 4

Lacey picks things up super super fast when she wants to, I taught her to "stay" in a matter of days (when I used grain). My pupil is brilliant. Heehee I think she's just one of those horses that needs a job like no other and her current job is learning EVERYTHING. =P

Oh yeah, Lacey is 24 and she acts like she's a youngster too. Yay for mares who look on age as just a silly number!

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post #8 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 10:51 PM
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Can your mare go in a snaffle?

Shay-la has a REALLY neat method that worked perfectly on her mares - cross your reins under their necks! That way, when you want to turn left and draw your rein over the right side of the neck, it's also pulling on the left side of the bit. So they're getting a direct rein signal, with the pressure of the rein and they pick it up fast!

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post #9 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 11:33 PM
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Training how to neck rein is very basic. It takes consistency and a horse that goes well in a snaffle first, but as long as you do that it is easy. Have your horse in a snaffle and cue with a neck rein, if there is no response (give a short moment so the horse has a chance) then follow up with the direct rein cue. Consistently do this and a horse usually starts picking it up pretty quickly.

You should do it in a snaffle though because you shouldn't really direct rein in a curb. The curb is more of a finished bit. Once the horse is responding to neck reining in a snaffle, then you can move to a curb and fine-tune the response.

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post #10 of 21 Old 07-07-2009, 11:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj View Post
Shay-la has a REALLY neat method that worked perfectly on her mares - cross your reins under their necks! That way, when you want to turn left and draw your rein over the right side of the neck, it's also pulling on the left side of the bit. So they're getting a direct rein signal, with the pressure of the rein and they pick it up fast!
This doesn't make sense to me. Why add something like crossed reins that will need to be removed/unlearned? It seems like it would confuse the horse after that pressure is no longer there. There's more than one way to skin a cat. The way we were taught was to direct rein on one side and neck rein on the other. For example, when turning to right direct rein with right hand and neck rein with left. Horses are smart creatures.

You are using a snaffle, aren't you?

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