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Western Tips

This is a discussion on Western Tips within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Findlay english riding
  • Riding western tips

 
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    03-18-2008, 11:18 AM
  #11
Started
Sit the trot, meaning no posting.

As I said, I have only done a short bit of English riding and didn't originally learn that way (also I have never had a trainer/riding instructor), so I have never been instructed to do no stirrups work and was not aware that is a normal thing in English riding.

My horse is extraordinarily bumpy, so it's natural to post, and bone jarring to sit deep in the saddle.
     
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    03-26-2008, 12:36 AM
  #12
Foal
I started english and switched to western. The hardest thing I found to learn was not to lean forward as much as you do in english. About sitting at a trot while riding english. I took about 2 years of lessons and only once sat the trot, I never rode without stirrups other than the ocassional dropping of one.
     
    03-29-2008, 05:02 AM
  #13
Yearling
Haha, just mentioning--it is really hard for most western riders to switch to english, because most of them (even good ones) don't have a secure seat. I went to the University of Findlay for western riding, and when we had 'english week'... a lot of the kids fell off/looked bad/couldn't control their bodies.
Not saying it can't be done (some could do it well), just that with all that saddle, it's hard to learn how to balance on your own.
With that being said. No contact in western, so don't grab at their mouths, you're using a lot more bit. The hardest thing for me was to SIT BACK! I was used to leaning a tad bit forward for a hunt-seat position.
Good luck!
     
    03-29-2008, 05:27 PM
  #14
tim
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayfieldk
Haha, just mentioning--it is really hard for most western riders to switch to english, because most of them (even good ones) don't have a secure seat. I went to the University of Findlay for western riding, and when we had 'english week'... a lot of the kids fell off/looked bad/couldn't control their bodies.
Yea, that's what annoys me about my competitors in western. Many of them simply can't ride. Still I think that claiming that even good western riders have a difficult time moving to english is a bit bold.

Heres the thing about a great western horse. It's very sensitive to subtleties. If you mount up on a world champion pleasure horse, don't be surprised to find that even slight twitches of your legs will bring about results. Pleasure horses and riders can be deceptive. The idea is to make the horse look like it requires the least input possible while riding. However, this doesn't mean that you teach the horse to drive itself. Riders need to be constantly adjusting their horses, especially in pleasure classes where a perfect frame and optimal movement are essential. This sets up the potential for western riders to be utter failures. They can either lean on the sensitivity of their horses and simply get lazy, or they can make the most of that sensitivity and become just as sensitive and specialized as their horses.

I actually found that english riding was easier than I had anticipated. The saddles are a bit smaller so the balance does become more important, but it seems so generous in terms of acceptable... I don't know... use of your tack? Obvious cues? Maybe even the level of control you're allowed to exert over your animal resulting in some horses that don't maintain the same personal discipline that many of the nice pleasure horses will.

I mean, in english classes, riders are allowed to keep their horses on the bit, and even post (which after beginning to ride english, I believe this is a tool that english people take for granted). Those two things alone seem so generous to western riders. To be allowed to have that kind of contact with your horse's mouth and provide such a dramatic demonstration of the desired cadence you wish to achieve through posting, you can make much more straightforward commands to your horse.
     
    04-04-2008, 09:53 PM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayfieldk
Not saying it can't be done (some could do it well), just that with all that saddle, it's hard to learn how to balance on your own.
With that being said. No contact in western, so don't grab at their mouths, you're using a lot more bit.
That is a popular misconception... I see why many people would think that because there are some Western saddles that are absolutely horrible. I always ride Western in a saddle that has the skirt cut out above the fenders, so it's a close contact saddle that allows you to really feel the horse. Anyone who rides western correctly rides with much less contact on the horse's mouth than when riding English. You have to use mostly leg to ride correctly Western.

English bits are designed for constant contact, Western are not. Bad hands on a Western bit is much harsher for the horse than bad hands on an English bit.
     
    04-15-2008, 03:18 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayfieldk
Haha, just mentioning--it is really hard for most western riders to switch to english, because most of them (even good ones) don't have a secure seat. I went to the University of Findlay for western riding, and when we had 'english week'... a lot of the kids fell off/looked bad/couldn't control their bodies.
Not saying it can't be done (some could do it well), just that with all that saddle, it's hard to learn how to balance on your own.
With that being said. No contact in western, so don't grab at their mouths, you're using a lot more bit. The hardest thing for me was to SIT BACK! I was used to leaning a tad bit forward for a hunt-seat position.
Good luck!
This is true...I guess I was just lucky in a way. When I started riding the people who were teaching me made me ride bareback for oh...the first year or so. So I never had a problem wuth my seat.
     
    04-16-2008, 08:42 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
mayfieldk wrote:
Haha, just mentioning--it is really hard for most western riders to switch to english, because most of them (even good ones) don't have a secure seat. I went to the University of Findlay for western riding, and when we had 'english week'... a lot of the kids fell off/looked bad/couldn't control their bodies.
Not saying it can't be done (some could do it well), just that with all that saddle, it's hard to learn how to balance on your own.
With that being said. No contact in western, so don't grab at their mouths, you're using a lot more bit. The hardest thing for me was to SIT BACK! I was used to leaning a tad bit forward for a hunt-seat position.
Good luck!
I think that this statement is competely WRONG - I have won world chapionships in BOTH hunter and pleasure - does this mean that I as a "good one" can't ride an english horse - my world championship in Hunter Under Saddle speaks otherwise.

If it is so hard to change from Western to English - why does EVERY show programme for the western breed also contain around 40 ENGLISH events?????? Clearly someone out there must be able to ride both english and western well or they wouldnt hold these classes would they?

I am not trying to attack you but it is a very BOLD statement as Tim said that IMO is completely wrong.
     
    04-16-2008, 09:51 PM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by I Love Lane
Quote:
mayfieldk wrote:
Haha, just mentioning--it is really hard for most western riders to switch to english, because most of them (even good ones) don't have a secure seat. I went to the University of Findlay for western riding, and when we had 'english week'... a lot of the kids fell off/looked bad/couldn't control their bodies.
Not saying it can't be done (some could do it well), just that with all that saddle, it's hard to learn how to balance on your own.
With that being said. No contact in western, so don't grab at their mouths, you're using a lot more bit. The hardest thing for me was to SIT BACK! I was used to leaning a tad bit forward for a hunt-seat position.
Good luck!
I think that this statement is competely WRONG - I have won world chapionships in BOTH hunter and pleasure - does this mean that I as a "good one" can't ride an english horse - my world championship in Hunter Under Saddle speaks otherwise.

If it is so hard to change from Western to English - why does EVERY show programme for the western breed also contain around 40 ENGLISH events?????? Clearly someone out there must be able to ride both english and western well or they wouldnt hold these classes would they?

I am not trying to attack you but it is a very BOLD statement as Tim said that IMO is completely wrong.

I don't think she was trying to attack you either. While they're both similar, English and western are both also super differant. I think it's equally hard to go English to western as it is to go western to English. Especially if you're riding properly not just pretending to be a cowboy.

I too am holder of a world title. But I will admit, switching can be difficult at first
     
    04-16-2008, 10:21 PM
  #19
Weanling
I guess what I was trying to get across was that with a trained rider - your thighs are your "seatbelt" and if you hold on properly with your legs (not death grip with your calves but with your seatbelt area) you should be able to ride in any type of saddle or without a saddle :) I just think that it is insulting to the style of riding to say that "most of them don't have a good seat". It is simply incorrect..... maybe at the beginner level - but not at the show level...... :P
     

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