What should I do..?
   

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What should I do..?

This is a discussion on What should I do..? within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        11-18-2008, 05:38 PM
      #1
    Foal
    What should I do..?

    I live in Denmark, where everyone learns dressage, and then jumping and hunting if they wish too. Those are the 3 main sports you could say.

    I love western riding, and have loved it for a long long long time.
    I'd love to take lessons and all!
    But.
    Apparently Denmark isn't a very 'western' country, because I could only find 1 western riding school on the island I live on! (Sjślland, the one with Copenhagen)
    And it's too far south for me to go there, even once a week!

    Of course once in a while I lengthen my stirrups and ride with long reins on my pony, pretending i'm a western rider, just for fun. XD But he's more of a dressage pony and has difficulty relaxing and obeying my commands on a long rein (because a. He's not used to them and b. He doesnt really know them because I don't know them myself, or how to teach him)
    I can make him go backwards on a long rein, around a corner and stuff, and opening and closing a gate (like trail), and I can do a kind of spin, though he probably does the footwork wrong and of course he's not really spinning, just going round and round more faster than usual.. xD

    So what should I do..? :(
    I'd love to learn more about how you ride and train western, i'd love to teach my pony a few simple things, he's a quick learner.
    But the problem is I don't know anything, just which equipment you need, stirrup length, that you need 2 long reins and a few exercises, which I don't know how to do, I just know about them..

    Maybe I can get some advice/tips/lessons online..?
    Nothing too serious, just to learn about it and stuff..
    I can post videos where you can maybe correct me and stuff..
    But I don't have all the equipment, just so you know.. But I don't think that should be a problem..? I'm really desperate.. xD
         
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        11-19-2008, 09:21 AM
      #2
    Weanling
    There are a lot of websites you can check out. The first one I suggest is Clinton Anderson (this is the link to the page with his training articles).

    I know the APHA has a regional club in Denmark.
    Paint Horse Club DenmarkLaura Roennow
    SecretaryKarlsgaarde Sovej 70
    6800 Varde
    DENMARK
    You can contact them to find out about the western riding activities and trainers in your country.
         
        11-19-2008, 11:06 AM
      #3
    Banned
    There are many books and online instructors that can give you pointers and help you. I know I have a Western Pleasure book that has different practice stuff to work on.

    You might also keep an eye out on different websites that advertise things...some people that do western lessons might not have a stables....I find that alot of times some don't because the discipline isn't popular. Here in NY, English riding is defiantely the favorite compared to Western so it was hard for me to find an instructor that taught western.
         
        11-19-2008, 01:03 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GottaRide    
    There are a lot of websites you can check out. The first one I suggest is Clinton Anderson (this is the link to the page with his training articles).

    I know the APHA has a regional club in Denmark.
    Paint Horse Club DenmarkLaura Roennow
    SecretaryKarlsgaarde Sovej 70
    6800 Varde
    DENMARK
    You can contact them to find out about the western riding activities and trainers in your country.
    6800 Varde is on another island.. :/ So that's too far..! I'll check out Clinton though..!
         
        11-19-2008, 01:06 PM
      #5
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SonnyWimps    
    there are many books and online instructors that can give you pointers and help you. I know I have a Western Pleasure book that has different practice stuff to work on.

    You might also keep an eye out on different websites that advertise things...some people that do western lessons might not have a stables....I find that alot of times some don't because the discipline isn't popular. Here in NY, English riding is defiantely the favorite compared to Western so it was hard for me to find an instructor that taught western.
    Yes but I can't imagine how much time and effort it will take to find someone who can teach western, especially since I'm not going to be very serious about it while I have my pony, since its too old to learn all the things now..

    By the way, how long does it approximately take to train a horse western..? Say its a young horse..
    Like how many average years? Just approximately.
         
        11-19-2008, 03:55 PM
      #6
    Showing
    It doesn't take very long to train a horse for the western discipline. Most of the time it is easier to train a horse that has not been trained for other disciplines because they don't get confused about the signals you give. My newest horse that I have trained was 6 and had never been handled. I started riding him and have only been able to ride maybe a few times a month due to the fact that he is at my dad's place. Anyway, he only has maybe 30 rides on him and he is very broke. Neck reins, does spins and sliding stops like a reining horse and never bucks. It may take longer to train a horse if you are not as familiar with the style or signals that need to be used but don't let that get you down. I ride nothing but western and love it. Good luck.
         
        11-19-2008, 04:26 PM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    It doesn't take very long to train a horse for the western discipline. Most of the time it is easier to train a horse that has not been trained for other disciplines because they don't get confused about the signals you give. My newest horse that I have trained was 6 and had never been handled. I started riding him and have only been able to ride maybe a few times a month due to the fact that he is at my dad's place. Anyway, he only has maybe 30 rides on him and he is very broke. Neck reins, does spins and sliding stops like a reining horse and never bucks. It may take longer to train a horse if you are not as familiar with the style or signals that need to be used but don't let that get you down. I ride nothing but western and love it. Good luck.
    Oh could you maybe just teach me some simple things, like how you stop the horse, make it turn, speed up and go backwards..? Like the commands and signals you use. I'll figure out how to train my pony myself, I always find a way how to teach him something, I just need to know what to teach him.. Like I said, I don't need to know how to do complicated things like slidding stops and such, but just the basics! :)
         
        11-20-2008, 02:55 AM
      #8
    Showing
    It all really depends on how your horse has already been trained. Does he stop and turn on leg pressure or via the bit and reins? Most of the signals that he has already learned can probably be used for either discipline and that would make it easier for you and your horse. Most of the work that I do is from the reins and I use leg pressure to accentuate like to get them to do a sidepass for opening gates or moving over with out turning or to signal lead changes. All of my horses neck rein instead of direct pull to turn. The difference is that when you neck rein, you signal the horse by pushing his neck over with the rein. Instead of pulling with the right rein to turn right, you move the left rein against his neck and in effect, push his neck to the right. To train a horse to do this, along with lots and lots of trail and town riding, I trot a lot of circles with minimal pressure on the inside rein along with pressure on the outside rein. What I mean is that trot in a right circle using the right rein to steer the horse with just enough pressure on the left rein to make him feel it on the side of his neck. Slowly ease the pressure on the inside rein until he is turning using only the pressure from the outside rein and then you have a neck reining horse. For stops and backing up both I just use equal backward pressure on both reins. The easiest way to get them used to working on a loose rein is just to do it. For the first little bit, you may have to reinforce the signal with an exaggerated motion, but just slowly keep working at it and he will eventually learn that less pressure is better and be responsive to even the slightest signal from you. I will try to get some video of Koda up sometime if I can get some. If you have more questions then by all means, don't be afraid to ask. It is always good to get numerous opinions and find out which one works best for you. :)
         
        11-20-2008, 03:12 AM
      #9
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    It all really depends on how your horse has already been trained. Does he stop and turn on leg pressure or via the bit and reins? Most of the signals that he has already learned can probably be used for either discipline and that would make it easier for you and your horse. Most of the work that I do is from the reins and I use leg pressure to accentuate like to get them to do a sidepass for opening gates or moving over with out turning or to signal lead changes. All of my horses neck rein instead of direct pull to turn. The difference is that when you neck rein, you signal the horse by pushing his neck over with the rein. Instead of pulling with the right rein to turn right, you move the left rein against his neck and in effect, push his neck to the right. To train a horse to do this, along with lots and lots of trail and town riding, I trot a lot of circles with minimal pressure on the inside rein along with pressure on the outside rein. What I mean is that trot in a right circle using the right rein to steer the horse with just enough pressure on the left rein to make him feel it on the side of his neck. Slowly ease the pressure on the inside rein until he is turning using only the pressure from the outside rein and then you have a neck reining horse. For stops and backing up both I just use equal backward pressure on both reins. The easiest way to get them used to working on a loose rein is just to do it. For the first little bit, you may have to reinforce the signal with an exaggerated motion, but just slowly keep working at it and he will eventually learn that less pressure is better and be responsive to even the slightest signal from you. I will try to get some video of Koda up sometime if I can get some. If you have more questions then by all means, don't be afraid to ask. It is always good to get numerous opinions and find out which one works best for you. :)
    Mine's trained to turn by using feet pressure and the reins just to guide the head in the right direction, so he's not going left and looking right or something.. x)

    Thanks alot, I'll try practicing that on him tonight!

    The way I make him go backwards on a loose rein is I pull the reins a little back, then I put my feet a little back and spueeze, which makes him go backwards, and if he doesnt react I click my tongue to get him moving! But its still hard because usually when I make him go backwards, I pull the reins back so he steps back, but now he has a loose rein and sometimes he wants to go forward instead, so I think its a little wrong to confuse him like that, but I think if I neck rein, it will be easier because I wont have to use the feet which normally I use to make him go forward!

    Again, thanks, I'll try this out and maybe I'll ask you something else sometime later, but right now I think it would be good to just practice that untill he's pretty good at it :p This helped alot!
         
        11-20-2008, 05:08 AM
      #10
    Showing
    No problem at all, you are very welcome. I am always happy to help in any way possible. Although sometimes I have trouble explaining things. Oh, by the way, when I ask a horse to back, I don't use my legs at all. Only bit pressure. This keeps them from getting confused because I use leg pressure on both sides at the same time to go forward. :) Good luck and have fun.
         

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