What type of western saddle puts you in a decent "classical" position? - Page 6
 
 

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What type of western saddle puts you in a decent "classical" position?

This is a discussion on What type of western saddle puts you in a decent "classical" position? within the Western Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        05-14-2013, 02:13 PM
      #51
    Weanling
    Everyone may ride as they wish, I was looking for input for people who understand the basics of the classical seat :) thanks all
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        05-14-2013, 03:00 PM
      #52
    Foal
    Snow- I have a rocking R Reiner, love the saddle. I ride with my legs back pretty far, got told I rode like a dressage rider, which whatever. I rope, ride colts, and show too. I find my reiner nice for arena work and showing. I own a Garrouette barrel saddle, and it does throw my legs forward, but not as much as a lot do. I own a couple older tex tan rope saddles and I ride in them most often. They don't throw my legs foraward like a Western Rawhide, I have nothing much good to say about the new Western Rawhides, old ones were good, anything built form the 90's and up is junk imo.
    SnowCowgirl likes this.
         
        05-14-2013, 03:25 PM
      #53
    Yearling
    I am a big fan of wade tree saddles. They do usually have a deeper pocket to sit in but the stirrups tend to be in a better position to keep you heels underneath you. Some are built up a bit more in the front than I like but not all. That is generally speaking mind you.
         
        05-14-2013, 04:03 PM
      #54
    Showing
    If your saddle is built to set you back further (fenders more infront) then it won't be possible or comfortable to be in a classical position.

    If, as I said before, the fenders are more set back then you will find classical position most comfortable and effective.
    smrobs and COWCHICK77 like this.
         
        05-14-2013, 04:13 PM
      #55
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SnowCowgirl    
    I'm wondering when and why a thread where I was merely asking a question had to turn into a debate *shrugs*
    Posted via Mobile Device
    It's a GOOD debate though, because as you can see....people have offered some valuable insight. Your question was not as cut and dried and basic as you thought, although I still hold that a classical seat is and always will be proper alignment when it comes to basic riding. When you go off into the specialities, such as cutting, timed event, cross country in eventing as examples...that is when things change a little because the horse is performing something other than trail riding or general riding.
         
        05-14-2013, 05:33 PM
      #56
    Foal
    I agree with GotaDunQh on the fact that in your original question you wanted a "classic" western seat with your legs under you. In my opinion, in most of the images that come up when you google - cowboys and vaqueros -- if you look at the older images, and observing most working "cowboys" ride, it is with your legs slightly forward. I don't think what has happened in the last 10 or even 20 years can be considered "classic", therefore that is why I felt the "need" to explain what my thoughts on the classic western seat looks like.
    Now, if you would have said classic western pleasure seat, etc, then there would have been no "debate" started...well, there may have been debate still, since it is what we do....lol
         
        05-14-2013, 10:27 PM
      #57
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GotaDunQH    
    It's a GOOD debate though, because as you can see....people have offered some valuable insight. Your question was not as cut and dried and basic as you thought, although I still hold that a classical seat is and always will be proper alignment when it comes to basic riding. When you go off into the specialities, such as cutting, timed event, cross country in eventing as examples...that is when things change a little because the horse is performing something other than trail riding or general riding.

    This is very true. And I shouldnt have posted what I did earlier - I was on my phone and was being lazy. It IS a good debate. I guess what I meant to say is that I know what I am looking for in a saddle.. not what old cowboys were looking for, or men who don't find it comfortable to keep their lower leg back, or whoever else :) I knew there were many different types of western saddles with different leg positions... I guess I should have specified that in my original post. I am looking for the type or the specific make/model of saddle that will help me ride without my legs being thrown forward.
         
        05-14-2013, 10:30 PM
      #58
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ropinbiker    
    I agree with GotaDunQh on the fact that in your original question you wanted a "classic" western seat with your legs under you. In my opinion, in most of the images that come up when you google - cowboys and vaqueros -- if you look at the older images, and observing most working "cowboys" ride, it is with your legs slightly forward. I don't think what has happened in the last 10 or even 20 years can be considered "classic", therefore that is why I felt the "need" to explain what my thoughts on the classic western seat looks like.
    Now, if you would have said classic western pleasure seat, etc, then there would have been no "debate" started...well, there may have been debate still, since it is what we do....lol
    ah! Is this where the confusion came from? I didn't mean to ask about the classical WESTERN position... when I said classical seat I was referring to THE classical seat, which most people would probably associate mostly with dressage

    Anyway, I didnt mean to sound irritated earlier about the debate because it IS a good debate!
         
        05-15-2013, 08:14 PM
      #59
    Green Broke
    I agree that it depends on what kind of riding your doing determines your seat/equitation. As lately I have been on a quest to better my seat but I am not going to run out and buy a Dressage saddle as it is impractical for what I do. I have found certain saddles within my discipline(if that's what you want to call it) are more accommodating to a classical seat than others hence the reason for my first post in this thread reffering to how and where the stirrup hangs in relation to the seat.
    My saddles have been great for arena use and showing(mainly lower level ranch horse shows and ranch rodeos) along with long hours outside working and roping. I have barrel raced in them as well although I find the big stirrups a pain and the foot easy to slide out.

    One of my saddles is the first pictured and is one of my favorites. It has been very versatile as far as saddles because it seems that saddles are mainly built to serve one event or discipline. (I think nrha mentioned this earlier)

    The second is a pic from a catalog from a well known saddle builder and you can see a big difference in how the stirrups are hung. And this isn't the most extreme I have seen as far as flung forward stirrups on a wade style saddle.(And not all of this builders saddles are that extreme) I have seen others that you would question as a saddle bronc rig because the stirrups are well out in front much like the position of legs in the pictures bsms posted.
    For those who think that just a strong core is needed in order to maintain position, I certainly would not enjoy fighting the hang of these stirrups in order to maintain a classic position.
         
        05-15-2013, 08:42 PM
      #60
    Super Moderator
    OP, don't worry about this becoming a "debate". That's not a bad thing. This is a subject we at HF have rolled around , over and over again. It's very interesting to hear each person's thought, their learning from books and their personal experiences. I appreciate the Bsms wants to ask the question "why" when things long accepted in "classical" teaching are raised as correct.

    We probably should ask why. We can assume, with some degree of security, that something that has been taught for centuries as the correct position has a long trial period to it, so likely to be correct. But, still, one can ask, "why?"
    An excellent question.

    I do have to disagree with bsms's comment:

    A dressage seat is also well behind the motion, unless the horse is moving in a collected gait - and since that is the goal of dressage, that is what the dressage position is intended for.

    I don't know why he would think that. Behind the motion? H m m ,.... not if the rider is riding correctly, be it walk, trot or canter. If the saddle is designed and balanced correctly to the hrose, and the rider sits up correctly, they should never be behind the motion, whether it is collected or extended.
         

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