Fencing panels - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 11-25-2019, 03:23 PM Thread Starter
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Fencing panels

I will be bringing home a horse in about a month. He's being boarded until we get our fencing set up. We have 42 acres, but are starting with fencing in about a quarter of an acre for possibly 2 horses. We were looking at fencing and came up with three options. One of them is using fence panels (they look like 10 foot gates but attach to each other on the ends). I like this option since it can be moved around and when we put in a more permanent fence these panels can be used for an arena, round pen, etc...or sold. They won't be wasted.

However, I was curious about how sturdy they really are. Has anyone used these for a large area? If so, how far can you actually go with them before you need a post to hold them up? If we're going to have to put in a lot of posts anyway, we might as well just go with a pipe fence and not waste time on these. Our enclosure will be about 100' on all four sides. Is that too far to take panels?

The definite horse is a 16 year old spotted draft gelding. His previous owners have had no issue with him trying to get out or pushing on the fences, but he is a hefty boy and could probably push something down if he really wanted to. The second horse is unknown at this point but if these panels are flimsy the least bit then I don't want to spend money on them.
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post #2 of 14 Old 11-25-2019, 05:37 PM
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Hmmm.... for a 'regular horse' I would say you're good with putting in a post about every 30' of fence for a longer run--- the strength of pipe panels really comes from the connecting panels on a circle or small corral. If you're doing a run of fence, they will move if a horse pushes on them unless you anchor the corners and periodically along the fence. If there's grass on the other side of the fence, it will be subject to more pushing or shoving than a larger area, and the more horses in a small area, the more wear and tear.



Now, since it's a draft horse, you have other concerns. A draft who has learned to push on fences can make short work of even the strongest pipe panels. The cheap ones from the farm store don't stand a chance. If he's respectful of fences, you will probably be fine. If he isn't, you'll have to reinforce the fence (any fence) with electric and make it zap hard to hold him.



One guy locally had a Belgian mare that would walk through anything you put her in... including the buffalo-strong heavy duty Priefert panels and the side of a barn.... she'd just put her chest or side up to whatever she wanted moved and start pushing.
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post #3 of 14 Old 11-25-2019, 06:11 PM
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Do you refer to...
or
First picture is what is more commonly called round pen panels that connect to each other by pin & chains but can be erected near anyplace and secured in place, then moved at your whim.
The others are livestock panels with different sized openings...16' long is common size and can get expensive in a hurry to fence property with. They must have a support system of posts to stand up. I've seen cattle bend the heck out of them when they got caught in it and hung up...they stand from 36" - 52" high.
For what livestock panels cost {horse specific} you can buy round pen panels having other uses easier to make since this becomes free-standing once you hook 2 panels together.

You can make as big, small or shaped as you wish and easy to add/subtract panels as needed or wanted.
{The difference between round pen panels and gates is round pen panels have a "foot" to elevate, support the pieces together}

For any horse that is draft in size or a fence tester...I would be electrifying my fence as a deterrent of touching/testing to push through it!
Make the current strong so it "bites"...

...
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post #4 of 14 Old 11-26-2019, 09:44 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horselovinguy View Post
Do you refer to...
or
First picture is what is more commonly called round pen panels that connect to each other by pin & chains but can be erected near anyplace and secured in place, then moved at your whim.
The others are livestock panels with different sized openings...16' long is common size and can get expensive in a hurry to fence property with. They must have a support system of posts to stand up. I've seen cattle bend the heck out of them when they got caught in it and hung up...they stand from 36" - 52" high.
For what livestock panels cost {horse specific} you can buy round pen panels having other uses easier to make since this becomes free-standing once you hook 2 panels together.

You can make as big, small or shaped as you wish and easy to add/subtract panels as needed or wanted.
{The difference between round pen panels and gates is round pen panels have a "foot" to elevate, support the pieces together}

For any horse that is draft in size or a fence tester...I would be electrifying my fence as a deterrent of touching/testing to push through it!
Make the current strong so it "bites"...

...

The green ones were what I was talking about. The other panels are also on our short list, but we would only use those if we were going to use pipe posts and weld them to the post. I think that option became the middle ground in cost. The first idea was pipe posts with the "no climb wire" all the way around...except for gates. But hubby pointed out that we would have to do a pipe across the top also since a pipe post won't hold up wire if something were to push down on it. That one is still an option that we are considering, my only hesitation is that if we did it that way I'd want an additional gate on the "back side" since we will probably fence in another area to be able to rotate paddocks or separate horses if needed and that's the direction we would want to fence in. The fully piped fence is way more "permanent" and although stronger would be a pain to take down if we wanted to change anything.
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post #5 of 14 Old 11-26-2019, 09:57 AM
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Maybe consider perimeter fencing being horse wire with a toprail...but use wood posts?
I personally will not have metal posts as I've seen firsthand the damage to a horses body rubbing on, bucking and landing on...catching their skin/body against can inflict some terrible injuries.
Even with a plastic cap that falls off in short time...no to metal posts for me.
Welding anything to those posts as you describe just made moving them not so easy either.


The round pen panels can easily be moved to create what ever configurations you need or want...
They can be also secured with sinking wood posts exterior of the panels, but then you could probably do those metal posts like that as long as the horses remain on the side away from that sharp edge and roughness.


Decisions, decisions...lots to make.
..
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post #6 of 14 Old 11-26-2019, 10:04 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
Hmmm.... for a 'regular horse' I would say you're good with putting in a post about every 30' of fence for a longer run--- the strength of pipe panels really comes from the connecting panels on a circle or small corral. If you're doing a run of fence, they will move if a horse pushes on them unless you anchor the corners and periodically along the fence. If there's grass on the other side of the fence, it will be subject to more pushing or shoving than a larger area, and the more horses in a small area, the more wear and tear.

It was the span of each side of the fenced area that concerned me. I knew 100' of panels like that was too much to stand up to not falling if pushed on, but wasn't sure how far you could actually go with them before putting in a post of some kind. Right now grass is the same on both sides of the fence but I'm sure that will change as soon as a horse is in there. Plus...doesn't the grass always look greener? If we have to put in too many posts along the sides (we knew the corners would have to be solid) then we might as well go with a full pipe fence).




Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
Now, since it's a draft horse, you have other concerns. A draft who has learned to push on fences can make short work of even the strongest pipe panels. The cheap ones from the farm store don't stand a chance. If he's respectful of fences, you will probably be fine. If he isn't, you'll have to reinforce the fence (any fence) with electric and make it zap hard to hold him.

We were told by the person we're dealing with in seeing/purchasing him that he doesn't push on the fences and just an electric tape fence would be fine. I trust them (not a stranger, one of my past trainers) but just because he doesn't push on the fence where he's been for years, doesn't mean he won't when moved to a new area. And we have no idea what we'll be getting as a second horse so we might as well put up something strong to begin with.




Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
One guy locally had a Belgian mare that would walk through anything you put her in... including the buffalo-strong heavy duty Priefert panels and the side of a barn.... she'd just put her chest or side up to whatever she wanted moved and start pushing.

I follow several draft groups on FB and have seen posts where people start talking about how many fences their drafts have gone through. They can definitely push their way through just about anything they want to go through. The guy I'm getting is only 15 hands high, but he is stout. I'd imagine anything that's not completely permanent, if he really wanted out he could get out.
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post #7 of 14 Old 11-26-2019, 10:25 AM
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The corral panels nominally come in 10, 12, and 16ft. As a free-standing barrier, that is with no additional support, they depend on being set at an angle to the adjacent panel for rigidity. In a straight line, you will want at least a t-post every second or third panel. If set in a circle, ie a "Round Pen", you can certainly make a free-standing 60ft diameter pen; possibly a little larger, but the closer the cord sections (the panels) come to a straight line, the more unstable it becomes.
Horses are large strong critters, and if they take a mind to, they will fold, spindle, and mutilate even the stoutest portable panels (and themselves in the process), but for the most part they will not challenge them, and so enclosures from them are generally quite secure.
They are expensive; a 12ft panel averages probably $100 new. If you can find decent used ones, maybe $60 for the same panel. They are very useful things, both for semi-permanent and temporary enclosures. Spring for at least one walk-thru gate; ~$250.
All that said, you can build a smooth-wire-on-t-post fence for a fraction of the cost, and it will do just as good of a job keeping horses inside the fence line. Wire fences go up fast, with little effort, particularly if you can find a burly youth to pound in the t-posts for you.
Have fun with your new kids.
Edit to add: If you don't mind spending the money, just do your property perimeter in steel pipe fence and be done with it. This will certainly enhance the property value (as a "horse property") at least the cost of having the fence installed. For 40 acres you are probably looking at what? $100K? Anybody have a better guess?
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Last edited by george the mule; 11-26-2019 at 10:43 AM.
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post #8 of 14 Old 11-26-2019, 10:26 AM
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I'd go with a more permanent solution sooner. With portable panels, if a horse gets caught in one, the whole things is coming down when they struggle. It won't break like a board will.


Maybe a general question for anyone, when you say pipe fencing, what exactly are you meaning? I have gotten the impression over time that what I know as pipe fences isn't the standard.
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post #9 of 14 Old 11-27-2019, 09:36 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
I'd go with a more permanent solution sooner. With portable panels, if a horse gets caught in one, the whole things is coming down when they struggle. It won't break like a board will.


Maybe a general question for anyone, when you say pipe fencing, what exactly are you meaning? I have gotten the impression over time that what I know as pipe fences isn't the standard.

This is what I mean by pipe fencing. It could also be the same type of upright posts with three horizontal pipes running across and no wires. Although the full pipe fence looks nice, it's much more expensive and I can just imagine a smaller horse (or even some bigger ones) trying to squeeze their bodies through the pipes.
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post #10 of 14 Old 11-27-2019, 09:52 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by george the mule View Post
If you don't mind spending the money, just do your property perimeter in steel pipe fence and be done with it. This will certainly enhance the property value (as a "horse property") at least the cost of having the fence installed. For 40 acres you are probably looking at what? $100K? Anybody have a better guess?

Outside of the money part of it which would be way more than we have to spend on fencing, we also hunt on our property. Although we are careful, accidents can happen so I don't want any horses running loose during hunting season. Our neighbors on one side aren't so careful and are the "city during the week, country on the weekend" type of people and they also hunt and at this point I'm thinking they should not even own firearms much less try to shoot anything with one. The horse corral/paddock will be set up in a manner that the neighbors can't see or reach the horses. And since they think it's ok to shoot up a fence line we don't want the horses to have free access to the property boundaries.
On the other side of our property is a big hay field. And rows of round bales close to the fence line. Just about any horse would try to push their way through to that tempting buffet.
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