Wire fence experience? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 01:21 AM Thread Starter
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Wire fence experience?

Hello all!

First time posting in this part of the forum, and as usual, I have a question:

My partner and I are in negotiations to purchase our first home. Which happens to be an acreage. Most of the land already has posts in to be fenced, but isn’t strung.

We have an EXCESS of wire that’s been offered to us free to use for the fencing if we want it. Anything free in this stressful time is carefully considered haha

It is COATED 22g wire. I emphasize because I wouldn’t consider it if it was bare. The horses are all lazy low energy animals that respect fences except to grab a mouth full of grass outside it when able to.

Any one used 22g coated wire before? Any thoughts on why it wouldn’t work? Picture of one of the spools for reference.
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post #2 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 01:52 AM
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I might use it for cross fencing (I'd have to get a hand on feel to know for sure) but I'd want something sturdier for perimeter fencing.
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post #3 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 03:07 AM
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I don't know what 22g means so just going on your pic. It looks thin & flexible, so not suitable for the main fencing wire. Why would you not use uncoated? I use high tensile(so it doesn't stretch) plain fencing wire. I only use soft/flexible stuff on my electric runs.
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post #4 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 03:27 AM
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One of my boarding barns uses something like that. They have five strands across with a hotwire also. It keeps all the horses in except one who has figured out how to walk through it. He doesn't do that very often but it sure gives us a scare if we can't find him right away!
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post #5 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 06:35 AM
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Wire you are considering using...
22 gauge = 0.025 inches and = .64 millimeters thick

High tensile smooth wire is
.25 =1/4 inch thick
12.5 gauge = 0.099 inch thick

So to put this in terms of what most can see and feel in their hand for "how thick is it"...
Not knowing how many strands of wire is inside under the wrapped coating...
Each strand though is about as thick as a thin piece of paper.
Knowing it is that thin, was this used for underground phone lines run from a junction box to a house...cause that is coated wire and looks like that does what my house phone has.... and it breaks real easy.

The lower the number the thicker the wire...
So most livestock/horse fence {woven wire} is at least 14 gauge and gets thicker with HD woven I've seen at 12.5 with top and bottom wires at 11 gauge at my local Tractor Supply.
Electric wire, just wire or coated wire is 12 gauge..

I just did replacement fencing so did some research about thickness and longevity vs. cost before making a substantial investment.
So, your 22 gauge wire I would equate to the thinnest of spaghetti....angel hair.
Where most horse fence would be thick spaghetti or linguini thickness...big difference.
Most extension cords people have in their homes are 14 or 16 gauge wire for example...now remember you have 3 strands of wire, then a insulation wrap and then the outer covering...but the wire itself is thin per strand.
Thicker usually also = better current conductivity...at least in my experience using power tools.

I would not use it anyplace myself for livestock containment even if electrified.
So thin it will take no abuse from even a small limb bouncing on it nor a gentle wind will have it breaking inside.
I would not use it for interior cross-fencing either.
To me, you get what you invest...
Good livestock fencing if doing wire needs to be able to not sag or break in a little breeze when posts are spaced anywhere from 8' - 16' apart.
People stringing hard woven wire do 8' - 16' lengths between posts commonly, and those who do electric wire often go further distances....that "free" wire is just not going to fit the need in this case I fear.
Save it for some other project, but as wire to keep the horses on the property or in designated areas inside the property, I would pass.

So, would I use it for horse fencing application..no!
...
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post #6 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 06:39 AM
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I think that 22 gauge is a little thin, most use 12 for horse fencing. That wire won't be free when the horses get out and damage something or themselves.
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post #7 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 07:24 AM
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And coated reduces the shock it transfers if it were to be electrified. The thinness means you could potentially melt the wire depending on current or surges.
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post #8 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 11:03 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
And coated reduces the shock it transfers if it were to be electrified. The thinness means you could potentially melt the wire depending on current or surges.
We weren’t planning on electrifying it.

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post #9 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 11:05 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
I don't know what 22g means so just going on your pic. It looks thin & flexible, so not suitable for the main fencing wire. Why would you not use uncoated? I use high tensile(so it doesn't stretch) plain fencing wire. I only use soft/flexible stuff on my electric runs.
I saw a post saying uncoated is super dangerous and is can injure horses but maybe I misunderstood

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post #10 of 25 Old 06-25-2019, 11:08 AM
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It's way too thin--- it will cut like a cheese grater if the horses hit it, and no way it will hold them without being electrified. It's far thinner than even the cheap, thin electric cord one can find at the farm store.

If cost is a concern, I would go with electrobraid or electric tape or the 16' wire premade cattle panels (depending on your post spacing) for your fencing, and fence in a small area to start with, making it larger as finances allow. This wire isn't made for horses and will cause more trouble than it's worth. I wouldn't trust it to contain my animals safely, and they are easy on fences.
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