Time for new tires... suggestions? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 25 Old 11-26-2015, 04:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016 View Post

Why the narrower tires for winter? Wider tires seem like they would be better for the very wet winters we have here when traction is needed more. Our summers are typically quite dry and I would expect a narrower tire to work better then.

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I'm right at 35k miles now and have 4mm tread depth remaining. The listings for these tires have them guaranteed to 60k miles (but I'm not eligible for any warranty on them because I bought the truck used)
Intuitively you are right - this is what I would have thought as well. There are conflicting opinions, but while "the wider the surface, the better the grip is logical", wider tyres are apparently not as safe on slush or water covered roads in winter. They are also not as good on fresh powdery snow. The logic here is that the narrower tyre cuts easier into slush/water/fresh snow in order to reach a surface where it can grip.
When driven in such conditions, tyres tend to build a wedge (while displacing material) at the front and the wider they are, the larger the wedge.

There were tests done by ADAC (Allgemeiner Deutscher Automobil-Club / General German Automobile Club) - a well-respected independent organisation (I guess the US equivalent is AAA), which found that winter tyres should be narrower.
Winterreifen-Test: Schlankere Reifen sind überlegen - SPIEGEL ONLINE
The major conclusion is that in critical situations narrower tyres perform better. Drivers should install the narrowest manufacturer-approved tyres for the winter. This seems to be the prevailing opinion and this is what I go by as well.

At the same time Continental recommends to put the widest fitting tyres for the winter for better grip.
Wide tires

Go figure, but I still like the narrower and ADAC's logic for winter. Also if car manufacturers recommend narrower for winter, there has to be a reason.

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60k miles is a lot of miles - almost 100k km! I never expect a tyre to do this for me and I am not an agressive driver by any stretch of the imagination.
I see Corporal has done 95k miles and this for me is out of this world, simply extraordinary.
35k miles for passenger-style tyres is not little to me, but this is just me. Here we are happy at 60k km and unhappy below 40-50k depending on the cost of the tyre (i.e. I would be pissed off if Michelins lasted less than 50k for me, but would be OK for Kumho - also because I'd be getting rid of them ). This is a broad generalisation of course.

Continental recommends that tyres be replaced at 4mm for winter tyres and 3mm for summer tyres.
Tyre Knowledge - Remaining Tread Depth
I suppose you also should be able to see how much you have left until you reach the thread wear indicators.
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post #12 of 25 Old 11-30-2015, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016 View Post

I'm right at 35k miles now and have 4mm tread depth remaining. The listings for these tires have them guaranteed to 60k miles (but I'm not eligible for any warranty on them because I bought the truck used)
Tire warranties mean nothing, and, if you could get a manufacturer to pay out because they didn't last as long as they claim they possibly could, you'd be the first. Never use warranty miles as a guide for anything. Use UTQG treadwear rating.
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post #13 of 25 Old 12-06-2015, 12:48 PM
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Cooper AT3...tires are excellent here in S Utah. Michelins are great tires but cut too easily on shale and gravel roads.
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post #14 of 25 Old 12-06-2015, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Naphth View Post
Tire warranties mean nothing, and, if you could get a manufacturer to pay out because they didn't last as long as they claim they possibly could, you'd be the first. Never use warranty miles as a guide for anything. Use UTQG treadwear rating.
Hmmmm at American tire I have never had a problem with mileage prorating....ever.
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post #15 of 25 Old 12-06-2015, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Comfortably Numb View Post
I see Corporal has done 95k miles and this for me is out of this world, simply extraordinary.
ROFL!!
I was really surprised, but these were sedan tires, and every driver in the family was using our Dodge Spirit. We had a flat, changed it out and THEN discovered that these were the Original Michelins, that came with the car when we bought it brand new!
I didn't know anything about tire rotation then, Except I went for new tires on another car round about the same year as this, and some girl who worked at the place I USED to buy tires from, chewed me out for NOT realizing the necessity of rotating my tires.
All I can say is Consider Michelins, because I still think that they make some of the best tires on the market. Also consider what my DH decided to do on our trailer, and mount up TWO spares. If you ever need them, you'll thank me.
Good luck on your search. You have put a lot more thought into it than I have, so I can benefit from YOUR research!!
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post #16 of 25 Old 12-07-2015, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal View Post
ROFL!!
I was really surprised, but these were sedan tires, and every driver in the family was using our Dodge Spirit. We had a flat, changed it out and THEN discovered that these were the Original Michelins, that came with the car when we bought it brand new!
I didn't know anything about tire rotation then, Except I went for new tires on another car round about the same year as this, and some girl who worked at the place I USED to buy tires from, chewed me out for NOT realizing the necessity of rotating my tires.
All I can say is Consider Michelins, because I still think that they make some of the best tires on the market. Also consider what my DH decided to do on our trailer, and mount up TWO spares. If you ever need them, you'll thank me.
Good luck on your search. You have put a lot more thought into it than I have, so I can benefit from YOUR research!!
Michelin makes wonderful tires....and owning a Michelin tire distributorship until 2010..I never ran anything else on any of our vehicles/RVs and heavy trucks. Retired and moved to SW Utah full-time. On my Dakota, F150 AND F250 I regrettably had to switch to a different brand (Cooper AT3) as I was constantly cutting slits in the Michelins on our gavel/shale/cinder roads. I got waaaaay to good at changing tires. The Coopers are a better TRUE AT tire in my environment. If you don't go off road much, the Michelin product is very hard to beat IMO.

I always carry two trailer spares, that's very good advice.
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post #17 of 25 Old 12-09-2015, 08:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal View Post
All I can say is Consider Michelins, because I still think that they make some of the best tires on the market. Also consider what my DH decided to do on our trailer, and mount up TWO spares. If you ever need them, you'll thank me.
Good luck on your search. You have put a lot more thought into it than I have, so I can benefit from YOUR research!!
It is verona who is looking for tyres - I have summer Michelin / winter Continental on my passenger car and summer Kumho (inherited and to be replaced after next summer) / winter Michelin on my SUV. Long-decided on brands here.



STT GUY, would you care to comment on fuel economy difference between Cooper AT and Michelin? I guess the Michelins you were driving in were road tyres and not AT since you do not mention it.
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post #18 of 25 Old 12-09-2015, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016 View Post



As best as I can tell, 10-ply is synonymous with load range E, 8-ply with load range D, 6-ply with load range C, and 4-ply with passenger tires. LT tires are supposed to be designed more for trucks/SUVs carrying heavy loads, with E being the highest load range (at least in the tires available to me). The higher the load range, the more weight it can carry. The ply terminology is an outdated term from when the tires were actually constructed with X number of plies (layers) and more plies meant stronger tires. These days tires are made from a variety of different materials, so the number of layers doesn't necessarily correspond to higher strength when comparing different tires. The ply rating people talk about today is a roughly equivalent to the number of 'traditional' plies that would have been necessary to create that level of strength.




Yes, this is correct all the way around.

I'm also a BF Goodrich and Cooper kind of guy. Michelin is running on their name now and are not really that much better of a tire and in some cases actually worse.

I also agree that wider tires are not the answer in snow, the opposite is the case. Also a tire with a more open tread, wider spaces, will do better generally speaking in the snow. Unless you drive a lot of miles and getting stuck is a concern I would lean toward the all terrain (AT) tires as well.

Load range E or 10 ply tires is what I run on my 3/4 ton truck. They can be quite stiff when aired up to their max 80psi. I run mine in the 50psi range when not towing or hauling. Any step up from what you have will be an improvement. I'm not sure you need E's but they would definitely do the job but so would a D.

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post #19 of 25 Old 12-10-2015, 04:38 PM Thread Starter
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I ended up getting the Yokohama tires I linked previously, and so far, so good. I definitely have more traction on wet roads (although I'm sure most any good quality new tire would feel better than worn out tires!) The timing was good, as we're being deluged with rain at the moment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ike View Post
They can be quite stiff when aired up to their max 80psi. I run mine in the 50psi range when not towing or hauling.
This brings up another question I have- how do you know what pressure to run at when you're not towing? The max pressure is 50 psi, which is what I should inflate them to for towing if I understand correctly (correct me if that's wrong!) The tire shop inflated them to 35 psi, which is what's on the label inside the driver side door for the OEM p-metric tires. They look a little 'flat' to me at this pressure. Is 35 psi too low for these tires? Could/should I inflate them to something higher for everyday driving?

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post #20 of 25 Old 12-12-2015, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016 View Post
I ended up getting the Yokohama tires I linked previously, and so far, so good. I definitely have more traction on wet roads (although I'm sure most any good quality new tire would feel better than worn out tires!) The timing was good, as we're being deluged with rain at the moment.



This brings up another question I have- how do you know what pressure to run at when you're not towing? The max pressure is 50 psi, which is what I should inflate them to for towing if I understand correctly (correct me if that's wrong!) The tire shop inflated them to 35 psi, which is what's on the label inside the driver side door for the OEM p-metric tires. They look a little 'flat' to me at this pressure. Is 35 psi too low for these tires? Could/should I inflate them to something higher for everyday driving?

Unless its the exact OEM replacement the "idiot label" in the door is irrelevant. Honestly your tire dealers competency comes into question for letting you drive out the door on a tire 30% underinflated.

Run your tires at 45 or 50 psi. I don't like to run a tire at anything under 10% of sidewall recommended inflation. Unless your rise quality at 50 sucks, just inflate them to 50 PIS (cold) and don't sweat loaded vs unloaded PSI.

Yokohama makes a good tire of high quality.
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