Just wondering why Gypsy and Friesian crosses are so popular now?? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 02:19 PM Thread Starter
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Just wondering why Gypsy and Friesian crosses are so popular now??

I keep seeing more and more sale ads for draft cross horses of all sorts but the gypsy and friesian crosses seem to be the latest fad. Anyone know why it's such a trend? I mean a lot of them are nice looking but don't drafts cost more to keep and have certain health issues in some of the breeds? Also you would need a larger trailer, and maybe harder to find a good fitting saddle.

We had a draft cross where we board last winter and he definitely ate/pooped/farted more than all the normal size horses.

Gypsy/Clydesdale

Gypsy/Quarter

Gypsy/Friesian

Friesian/Mustang

Friesian/Andalusian
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post #2 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 02:26 PM
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Beacause hair.
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post #3 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 02:28 PM
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Because the canter is like riding a wave, flowing and hypnotizing!
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post #4 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 03:01 PM
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I would say because people like them, and the positives outweigh the negatives for their owners. Not everyone likes the same things.
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post #5 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 03:50 PM
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Itís a demand and supply thing.
When the demand falls off the supply will have to do the same.
People like different things.
Iím surprised that anyone would find a gypsy cob or gypsy X to need more food than a similar height of horse. Theyíve evolved to stay fat on next to nothing.
We had a lot of cob types in the riding schools Iíve worked at and they were all easy keepers despite the hard work
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post #6 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 03:56 PM
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Copious HAIR which is the end all be all trait some attribute to "TRUE" drafts and perceived refinement while still being considered a draft. At least that is the way I see it. IMO The cross is because each breed had an initial purpose that didn't always line up so well with what most want to do with their horses so they were crossed to get the "IDEAL" and sadly as many of us know that is not the way breeding works.
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post #7 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 04:18 PM
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I used to be a big hair fan. Especially after I bought Dreams, who with his Appy blood got hosed a bit on the hair gene, I was desperate for something with hair. Then I bought Thunder the Shire and I can tell you fo sho that nope, don't want hair anymore. Hair sucks. Poor Thunder muffin sweats like crazy in the summer, his hairy feets get clumps of mud and full of stickers when we go off roading,, and it takes me LITERALLY HOURS to bathe him. 15 minutes per leg, to shampoo and then rinse rinse rinse, 15 minutes for the mane, a full 30 or 45 minutes for his ultra-thick, super coarse tail Ö. Don't even me started on the tail. If I don't cut it, his tail gets so thick and heavy that he can't move it out of the way when he poops, so during the 6 months of freezing temps around here when we can't bathe the horses, his tail is full of poopcicles if I don't lop it off. Now I know why draft people dock their horses' tails Ö much less maintenance.

So to facilitate less sweating during the summer months and easier cleaning during the winter months, I now keep Thunder's mane and tail trimmed short - 4 to 6 inches for the mane, lopped off at the hocks for his tail. I also will periodically grab a giant hunk of hair at the base of his tailbone and lop that off too, to thin his tail a bit so he doesn't poop on it. It works for us and has shortened bath time considerably - it's still over an hour, but that's infinitely better than 2 hours or more. I would buy a Gypsy or Fresian cross - I've actually been looking at getting a Fresian cross for a faster, showier driving horse with a bit more endurance than a Shire - but I don't know if I'd buy either of them purebred. Maybe a Freisan. Maybe. Definitely not a Gypsy.

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post #8 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 05:12 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
Itís a demand and supply thing.
When the demand falls off the supply will have to do the same.
People like different things.
Iím surprised that anyone would find a gypsy cob or gypsy X to need more food than a similar height of horse. Theyíve evolved to stay fat on next to nothing.
We had a lot of cob types in the riding schools Iíve worked at and they were all easy keepers despite the hard work
The horse at our barn had been donated to a kids summer camp and our BO was overwintering him. She said nobody knew what exactly cross he was. He was cobby and had lots of feathering but not as much as a gypsy. We def had to feed him more to keep his weight up but otherwise he seemed to be in good shape.
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post #9 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 06:09 PM
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My youngest son wanted a cob after he rode one that belonged to a UK eventing family.
Not all cobs have feathers, that one was a Suffolk Punch cross and she was quite clean legged but we ended up with a Clyde x Arabian that looks like a mini Clyde and she has the feathers. I clip them off and her mane and tail get pulled and trimmed.
Sheís quite the feisty type and goes where you point her.
Itís hard to keep weight off her and it doesnít take much for her to get a bit wide for me - I look like one of those Thelwell kids on her!
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post #10 of 21 Old 07-16-2019, 08:09 PM
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A couple days ago I was at a barn where a young black Gypsy cob or pony (pretty small compared to some Gypsy Cobs I've seen) was being shown to a prospective buyer. This was for a cart prospect, not riding. She was SO dang cute with her feathers! I really saw the charm. But I still would never want feathers. Not where it is hot and humid in the summer, or dry and burr-ridden in the summer, or very snowy in the winter. You know where it isn't any of those things, typically? Britain. Oh, and also? Friesland. Not coincidentally home of the featheriest breeds.

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