Help with Lofty Trot - New horse - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 07-08-2020, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
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Help with Lofty Trot - New horse

This makes me feel like a novice again, so humbling. My new horse is a sensitive TB, pretty powerful in the hind end and has a real springy trot. My coach is out of town til next week, and my ride today was terrible.

The warm up was fine, I kept his mind occupied with square corners, serpentines, walk pirouettes. But when it came time for trot, his trot throws me up so much it slightly disorganizes me. It also feels too fast, though in videos I've seen, its actually not. It just feels like it. So I end up half halting in my perception that its too quick, and managed to really tick him off such that he began raising his head and throwing it around. My hands came up and it became ugly, to say the least.

I'd let my stirrups down a notch from my usual length, maybe thinking I'd ride with a longer leg. But then as I became more dis organized and somewhat anxious, I started loosing my left stirrup. In the end, I had a frazzled horse, and hoped to end on a good note by just walking and doing lateral work. This is only my 4th ride overall on this guy. When a horse has such spring, how best to post? Longer in the air? It feels so different from my old horse and my girl friend's Morgan that I ride. I will put my stirrups up again so at least i can post more efficiently. I don't want to ruin this horse!

Last edited by horselovinguy; 07-08-2020 at 06:42 PM.
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post #2 of 11 Old 07-08-2020, 06:27 PM
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How about some lessons on the lunge to help develop an independent seat? Any friends at the barn with a nice schoolmaster type that doesn't mind helping out? And just time in the saddle with him to grow stronger--it sounds like you are working muscles with this guy that weren't used before, I understand that completely BTDT! Good luck!
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post #3 of 11 Old 07-08-2020, 07:02 PM
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Rather than actively posting, can you just let his motion toss you up? Alternately, try posting from your butt and core (if you aren't already) rather than your legs.
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post #4 of 11 Old 07-08-2020, 11:06 PM
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I know the feeling on another super bouncy TB. Some of them are like trampolines

I think the suggestion to be lunged is a good idea, so that you can figure out your balance on this horse without having to think about other things. Ease into it at first. It's okay to start slow, then add more power to the trot when you've adjusted better. and really focus on keeping your weight centered over your seat bones and down the leg into the stirrup.

I've also found that working on strengthening my core, back and legs outside of riding really helps with these horses, who are a real workout to ride already! You need a certain amount of tension to prevent yourself from being flung about the saddle, but you also need to find that balance where you can be toned and relaxed.
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post #5 of 11 Old 07-08-2020, 11:11 PM
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Dump the stirrups and find where your balance is on this horse.
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post #6 of 11 Old 07-09-2020, 10:25 AM
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Engage your core to control the arc of the post. You don't need to force the post or anything, but with the big trots like that, you need to work with the motion. If you just let yourself get tossed up without the core engaged, you lose your seat. You want an engaged core, but not tight and holding through the thighs.
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post #7 of 11 Old 07-10-2020, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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I was chatting with my ladies who have warm bloods who have big movement and got some good advice. Namely, stay in as a good a balance with them as possible and engage your core but relax, too! We had some laughs as my friend said she's exhausted after trotting for 15 minutes on her big warmblood. Another friend who is a veteran instructor said by lengthening my stirrups I wasn't doing myself any favors, but we will see today as I have a lesson, yay.

Our relationship is very new, and I'm hoping to rise (LOL) to the occasion. I'm also hoping to manage this new learning curve in an old body!
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post #8 of 11 Old 07-10-2020, 03:08 PM
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I agree. Having stirrups too LONG is not helpful. I see a lot of dressage riders with their stirrups too long, and it often makes them 'fish' for the iron with their toes, which causes the lower back to curl inward, dumping the pelvis forward, to which they lean back and end up in the 'water skiers' position. SO hard on both horse and rider's back.
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post #9 of 11 Old 07-10-2020, 05:21 PM Thread Starter
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The lesson today helped to regain my confidence that I will be able to ride more effectively. My instructor is good in her descriptions of how my contact was inconsistent and how my horse looks for steady but light contact. After having ridden my steady Eddy for 8 years, this feels like another world to me. I must have really ...been an ineffective....rider before. Yikes.
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post #10 of 11 Old 07-15-2020, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livelovelaughride View Post
The lesson today helped to regain my confidence that I will be able to ride more effectively. My instructor is good in her descriptions of how my contact was inconsistent and how my horse looks for steady but light contact. After having ridden my steady Eddy for 8 years, this feels like another world to me. I must have really ...been an ineffective....rider before. Yikes.
I wouldn't say ineffective, you're just used to a different type of horse.
I personally love riding horses with huge movement because with my tall-ness I find it comfortable. That said, all three advice here that you've been given would definitely help-

Your core is being more engaged so it's understandable it's hard to find your center. I'd suggest wide range core exercises, and of course riding this horse more often. Heck, challenge yourself with a sitting trot on the short end of the arena once or twice. That'll get you used to this horses movement a bit better.
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