Can I ride Western in English tack? - Page 5 - The Horse Forum
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post #41 of 52 Old 06-02-2017, 01:56 PM
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Perhaps, I should have just posted some of my own examples, far as a western horse able to understand and accept light contact, having been originally trained useing contact

Charlie, ridden by afriend, when I was getting over knee replacements



Charlie leased one summer, to another friend, who rode her English




My Einstein, just relaxing, warming up English



Charlie, crossing a river, head just where she feels it needs to be




Charlie, finding her own best way down this bank




Einstein, just on atrail ride


Here I am riding Charlie with some contact, western, during atraining session



Does not mean I don't get the following, just riding out, and perhaps a more 'broke' ride also, should I need it.



It is kind of disappointing that the entire purpose of those posts were over shadowed by people feeling they needed to critique the training instead, while I I wanted to show, was that a well trained western horse has a foundation suing bit contact, can go back to it, even once he is ridden one handed and on aloose rein, giving to that bit, versus throwing head in resistence
I was not holding Dana on a pedestal trying to prove she is a trainer without compare, so why google to show her using technique that I myself do not like, when it has absolutely nothing to do with whether western horses understand and can accept contact?
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post #42 of 52 Old 06-02-2017, 02:01 PM
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very nice photos. I ride similarly.
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post #43 of 52 Old 06-02-2017, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
Knowing nothing about "proper" Western riding, allow me to ask: Is this a standard riding position in Western? She seems very far back in her saddle, her feet out in front of her. Does that not create a risk of being "left behind" if the horse accelerates?
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post #44 of 52 Old 06-03-2017, 02:10 AM
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Originally Posted by mmshiro View Post
Knowing nothing about "proper" Western riding, allow me to ask: Is this a standard riding position in Western? She seems very far back in her saddle, her feet out in front of her. Does that not create a risk of being "left behind" if the horse accelerates?
This is a western pleasure class, not equitation, and even so, her aleignment is pretty good, and her feet are not ahead, but under her.
It is a modification of riding position, , far as sitting back, although this is not really an example of that, to help slow a horse in western pleasure, and if your horse accelerates fast , then you are out the gate, far as western pl!
The rider;s shoulder hip and heel are in great aleignment. The rider is also petite, and perhaps the saddle seat is a bit large for her
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post #45 of 52 Old 06-03-2017, 02:18 AM
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I probably ride with my feet a bit too far forward, a habit from usually riding in my balance ride saddle at home, which puts me in that position

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post #46 of 52 Old 06-03-2017, 03:56 AM
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Your horses are great. Shows very well that horses can do many different things very well.
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post #47 of 52 Old 06-03-2017, 11:42 AM
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Hopefully you have a tack store where you can actually sit in a variety of saddles and see what's most comfortable.

My favorite trail saddle is my deep seated dressage saddle and since you ride in those with a longer leg than hunt, it might work for you. Wearing half chaps with it makes it an extremely secure saddle too.

Also, bear in mind that not only are synthetics lighter and cheaper but the seat is also softer and they can be scrubbed with soap and water. My old Abetta is about the ugliest saddle I've every seen but everyone fights over it because the seat is so comfortable!

For trail and riding around casually, no one is going care about your "style" (one of the many things I love about trail riding!).
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post #48 of 52 Old 06-03-2017, 11:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmshiro View Post
Knowing nothing about "proper" Western riding, allow me to ask: Is this a standard riding position in Western? She seems very far back in her saddle, her feet out in front of her. Does that not create a risk of being "left behind" if the horse accelerates?
Take this with a big steaming cup of FWIW, since I'm a self-taught rider...

First, many western cantles are 4" high. Some are 5". The old western saddles often went higher. One in a museum had a 9 inch cantle! It isn't like a jump saddle or even my Aussie saddle. You don't feel like there is a big risk of sliding off the rear.

But for proper riding, your legs move to where they can help you most with what you are doing. With a green or spooky horse, or riding in a place where your horse may throw it in reverse or stumble, then heels forward with a long leg can be a very good thing. Any unexpected slowing or stumble just drives you into the stirrups. Crow hops are pretty easy to ride like that, too.

If my horse may spin, then I feel best balanced with my heels under my hip. That puts my weight further back, which is what the horse does when he spins. It also means I simply rotate around with the horse. My position matches the spin. Seems to work well for a western jog, too.

For normal riding, I like what the British Cavalry taught in the early 1800s: that the heel should be just in front of a plumb bob dropped from the soldier's chest. That gives me the option of sliding my feet a few inches forward or a few inches back very easily. I think of it as the equivalent of a tennis player trying to stay near the center of the court. Not all balls come down the center, but you don't want to be far to the right when the ball goes far to the left!

As speed increases, most western riders adopt a forward seat. Longer leg, but heels and shoulders come forward to match the horse.

In a show, a lot depends on the type of show and the current ideal. This was considered good reining form in 1987, but would freak people out today:



My favorite saddle's resting, "neutral" position puts my feet forward. For the horses I ride and where I ride, that is fine. It is like when I visited an old friend on a ranch in Utah last summer. I asked him the proper way to do something. "Out here", he replied, "there may not BE a proper way. I can show you how I like to do it, but others do it differently and get good results."

I'll never cut cattle, but my horses have tried to cut garbage cans, so to speak. This video is closer to what I like in western riding and riders. It would make no sense in an equitation class but has worked for me when my horse has swapped ends in a spook:



Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"
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post #49 of 52 Old 06-03-2017, 02:56 PM
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All modern performance western saddles allow you free moment of your legs
My balance ride is made that way.
Can't have those old equitation saddles with the built up front, that locked you in place, nor all that bulk under your legs, not if you are going to take acow down the fence, or ride a sliding stop, ect

Close contact on my balance ride



[URL=http://s335.photobucket.com/user/KiloBright/media/BRnearside_zps4684a2b9.jpg.html][/URL

me, running poles some time ago



My son, turning a cow on the fence

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post #50 of 52 Old 06-04-2017, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
I wonder when western riding became so much about pulling on the face of the horse?

here is another video by the same trainer, Smilie, who herself says she doesn't do the ol' snap-snap on their mouths, . . . and yet, look at this!

Everything in my being as a horseperson who has spent 18 years learning, still an utter amateur though, rebels against this kind of handling:

http://youtu.be/d2n2kcT5jd0
I absolutely could not watch that video all the way through. What horrible hands that woman has!! My mare would dump her on her butt and deservedly so! The horse was obviously unhappy. Can't imagine why anyone would want to yank continually on a horse like that. That horse is a saint.
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