Horse Heavy on Forehand at Canter - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 75 Old 12-28-2011, 08:22 PM
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The D ring with copper rollers would be ideal - the D shape helps with turning and the copper rollers encourage him to salivate and not to grap hold of the bit so easily.

The pelham will assist with brakes but will also encouorage him to get his head down.

Using the ooutside rein is giving him a half halt - if you give it strongly then the result should be more immediate. As he begins to respond to this then the aid can become lighter.

Try using one rein stronger than the other - this unbalances the bit in his mouth making it harder for him to lean. Remember that if you pull - he will pull. The aids need to unbalance him a little - this is where lots of turns, loops and serpentines come in to use, but you need to do lots, and not go around and around the schooling area without doing soomething different.
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post #22 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Corazon Lock View Post
I wish I had an arena but I don't... :( But I'm sure I can practice all these exercises in the pasture. I had a lesson today and Rusty was pretty heavy, but I noticed after the jumps his canter lightened (we were trotting in and cantering out). Is his leaning on the bit and being hardmouthed part of the forehand ordeal?
Yes (for leaning and No for hardmouthed - hard mouth was caused by poor riding/training). Jumping makes horse shift weight off forehand onto hind legs, thus making the forehand lighter.

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post #23 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 12:25 PM Thread Starter
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So does jumping itself help Rusty learn to lighten his forehand and use his hindquarters? He's always been hardmouthed...not sure how to cope with that, but he definitely ignores me the worst at the canter when he's leaning on the bit.

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post #24 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Corazon Lock View Post
So does jumping itself help Rusty learn to lighten his forehand and use his hindquarters? He's always been hardmouthed...not sure how to cope with that, but he definitely ignores me the worst at the canter when he's leaning on the bit.
Haven't read the entire thread but have you tried half-halts? And also playing with the reins thus wiggling the bit in his mouth a little might make him give.

As for hard mouthed.. it helps to make sure your horse knows AND RESPONDS to key words like walk, halt, trot so you can work on using softer aids to get him to come back down. If he responds even a little bit, make sure you reward it.. it can be hard though.

What happens if you use a loose rein and go through w/t/c and down again?
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post #25 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 01:29 PM
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Wriggling the bit is what you don't do! If the horse is not yet accepting the contact all wriggling the bit will is possibly drop his head but will not engage his hind end.

When the horse truly accepts the contact he brings his hindquarters under him and works through a rounded supple back yielding at the poll.
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post #26 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 02:49 PM
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My horse is EXACTLY the same, some people who watched him put it down to him being green and said he'd grow out of it, but after 9 months or so of extremely little improvement, if any, i got an instructor in. He also used to do it pretty bad in trot. Never at walk though so I thought it was a balance thing. My instructors first suggestion was a stronger bit, but I disagreed straight away and said I didn't want to use anything stronger than a snaffle on him. She also suggested a dentist to check out his teeth, but he'd seen one. The last thing was, in canter, or trot, to lift up the inside hand quickly and sharply to stop him leaning, it has to be up though, not back, straight up. It did get his head up, but most of the time it went straight back down, but I continually did it, and we are seeing an improvement, so maybe it'll work for you. We also do lots of circle work, transitions and such. Halt/Walk to canter is a good one but it makes my horse really lively and excitable so I tend to stick to trot-canter etc.
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post #27 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Tnavas View Post
Wriggling the bit is what you don't do! If the horse is not yet accepting the contact all wriggling the bit will is possibly drop his head but will not engage his hind end.

When the horse truly accepts the contact he brings his hindquarters under him and works through a rounded supple back yielding at the poll.
Well if he's pulling on the bit, pulling won't help and I understand the mechanics of being round and supple.. but if he's just plowing on the front end, I've found that getting them to soften in their mouth (NOT yank them into a headset, but to stop holding onto that bit) then you at least have more to work with and can work on bringing the horse back on its hind.

Right? Please correct me if I'm wrong.
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post #28 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 03:29 PM
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Gently sponging the reins (aka wriggling the bit) I have found helps the horses I have ridden to relax their jaw.

It's a waste of time to try to engage their hind end if they don't relax at the jaw and at the poll first.
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post #29 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by mildot View Post
Gently sponging the reins (aka wriggling the bit) I have found helps the horses I have ridden to relax their jaw.

It's a waste of time to try to engage their hind end if they don't relax at the jaw and at the poll first.
:) yeah I agree!
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post #30 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 03:59 PM
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I agree that spiraling trot circles work wonders.

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