Horse Heavy on Forehand at Canter - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 04:14 PM
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Conformation and the rider's ability to overcome certain conformations are also something that needs to be taken into consideration.
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post #32 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 04:19 PM
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Conformation and the rider's ability to overcome certain conformations are also something that needs to be taken into consideration.
Would you elaborate, please?
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post #33 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 05:30 PM
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Okay I watched the video again and I think you need to take the jumps away and work him on the flat (not a lesson.. just, riding.) Someone brought up the fact to me that he seems stiff.. and now I see it too. You need to get him working on being giving and soft in his neck, his feet, his jaw.. his back, everything.

When you were trotting him, it was a working trot, but it wasn't put together. Probably because you had a lot of things going on and there were jumps you had to prepare for. I would slow this trot down with some good half halts and get him working on the rail and then figure eights, and 20 meter or larger circles. Get him bending.. carrot stretches when you are tacking up, little bits of ground work here and there. Lunging on a line directing his nose and pushing him away and forward. Etc.

I wouldn't even focus on his heavy on the forehand until you address the stiffness.

But slow that trot down and keep it very slow. Almost a jog. It's harder work and he'll learn how be very light with his feet instead of plowing them down.

When he's looser, and softer, then you can start directing him more on his hind. And I think you need more trot and walk work before you can get that canter down.

Hopefully I didn't seem rude or get too rambly. I would DEFINITELY find someone that knows dressage in one way or another.. it would benefit you and your horse soooo much. The reason I say dressage is because they focus entirely on the mechanics and deep seat to connect the horse. Though you could probably find a trainer in another discipline that is just as knowledgeable. I just speak from experience is all :)
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post #34 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 05:39 PM
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Skyes - stiffness and being on the forehand go hand in hand.
Stiffness must be addressed at the same time as bringing the horse off the forehand - riding forward, juggling the horse between the legs etc.

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post #35 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 06:25 PM
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Corazon Lock, you might try posting this question on the jumping forum. There are differences in what a jumper is after and what a dressage rider is after, and you might get some jumping specific advice on the jumping forum.

I don't understand the differences well enough to explain, but I think for jumping you need him to be able to gather himself is a short distance and for a short duration in prep for the jump, while dressage is oriented to teaching collected movement. I don't do either sport, but the jumping folks may be able to give you some discipline oriented advice.
"...you hear people say that they collect their horses before the jump or in a trappy situation in the hunting field...One in a thousand of those who use this word so easily, really collects his horse. The best of the rest merely refer to the ability of their horses to change their balance by gathering themselves, which is known as 'coming back' and which requires only a simple technique on the part of the rider....and you will have to argue hard to prove that it [collection] is necessary for cross-country riding and jumping." - V.S. Littauer, "Common Sense Horsemanship" page 203

Riders ask "How?" Horsemen ask "Why?"

Last edited by bsms; 01-03-2012 at 06:27 PM.
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post #36 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 06:42 PM
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Skyes - stiffness and being on the forehand go hand in hand.
Stiffness must be addressed at the same time as bringing the horse off the forehand - riding forward, juggling the horse between the legs etc.
Why's that?
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post #37 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 06:48 PM
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Because if the horse is balancing on his shoulders and neck, there will ALWAYS be resistance in the shoulder, neck, poll, jaw and back. If the back cannot swing, there will be resistance in the hind quarters. You will never get the horse truely supple and relaxed, if it is dragging itself around on its front legs.

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post #38 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 07:03 PM
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My guess is this horse is traveling true straight and not horse straight, hence no proper bend which makes half halts useless since they cannot go through. OP, when you are cantering this horse on a straight line, can you see his inside eyelashes and touch of nostril?

You just have to see your distance...you don't have to like it.
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post #39 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 08:27 PM
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Basic schooling for a show jumper is no diferent than that for a dressage horse. You want to develop a horse that will move off your leg as soon as asked and will slow down when asked and is supple so that it can get around turns in a balanced manner - these are achieved in exactly the same way in both disciplines.

When you want to go further then yes the dressage rider want expression in paces and the show jumper wants to jump higher and faster.

For both, the horse supple both laterally and longitudinally will be able to co-operate.
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post #40 of 75 Old 01-03-2012, 08:31 PM
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Adding to the above post, the showjumper needs to be sitting on its haunches just as well as a low-mid level dressage horse if its going to get over big fences in a controlled manner. Therefore, advice from a straight out dressage rider and straight out showjumper SHOULD be the same.
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