how does jumping work?? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 04:34 AM Thread Starter
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how does jumping work??

hi everyone,
I recently did a bit of jumping with my loan, just under 60cm, Annnnd it did not go so well- she was great, I just have no clue how to jump

my timings off, I have no idea on my position and I bounced out the saddle TWICE.

I cant jump her regularily as she's got arthritic back legs (we went only intending to do some elevated trot poles, but she was going so well that we thought she would be fine to jump, and she was, again the issues were mine)

we only trotted the jumps (she's got a very stretched out canter, and our school is quite small so I don't have much practice steering her at canter) but I think possibly part of the issue is that this made the jumps less fluid as she sort of pinged over them

I understand what a jump position is, and I try and do it but I still get bounced- maybe not coming out enough? idk

also we don't have a jump saddle- we have a pretty chunky, almost dressage saddle, so idk how that might affect it

I would just like to add I've never done more than the odd cross pole, and she's probably not jumped for over a year (I would guess more) so were both kinda clueless
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post #2 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 06:59 AM
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For a starters the saddle doesn't matter - I hunted my last horse for four seasons in a dressage saddle, and jumped many big fences.

Most people come to issues by going forward to soon, to far and for to long.

60 cm (2ft) does not require a great deal of swing, you only need to raise your butt out the saddle a couple of inches.

The best way to get the feel is to have a grid of six or more bounces and do them without stirrups.
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post #3 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 07:21 AM
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Jumping out of trot is harder because a jump is basically an extremely elevated canter stride. So your horse is therefore essentially transitioning into canter while jumping, and it can feel awkward.

That being said if you develop your core and lower leg (both on and off the horse!) it will get less difficult because your position will be stronger. And the only way to get good at it is to do it!

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post #4 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 07:57 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony View Post
Jumping out of trot is harder because a jump is basically an extremely elevated canter stride. So your horse is therefore essentially transitioning into canter while jumping, and it can feel awkward.

That being said if you develop your core and lower leg (both on and off the horse!) it will get less difficult because your position will be stronger. And the only way to get good at it is to do it!
I know! I would love to practice- but my horse cant be jumped regularly (atheritc hocks) that being said when warmed up, and on a good day, I will deffo try the odd jump, I doubt her owner would mind as she does genuinely enjoy them, I just haven't really thought of it as its not something I really enjoy.

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Originally Posted by Foxhunter View Post
For a starters the saddle doesn't matter - I hunted my last horse for four seasons in a dressage saddle, and jumped many big fences.

Most people come to issues by going forward to soon, to far and for to long.

60 cm (2ft) does not require a great deal of swing, you only need to raise your butt out the saddle a couple of inches.

The best way to get the feel is to have a grid of six or more bounces and do them without stirrups.
defiantly this! Ive notice I stay tipped forward slightly for a few strides, and I really don't know when she's going to jump as its such a new feeling.
the first big jump she just trotted into, didn't even try to jump XD. then the second she pinged over and I guess I got left behind, with the saddle throwing me forward (ended up on her neck lol). third was better but still pretty bad lol

we actually did about 15 jumps, but most were put down as there were quite a few nervous jumpers. it was just the bigger ones that were an issue for me- honestly I have barely any experience and 60 cm is probably my highest jump- think I'm used to ones that are more of a leap than a jump if that makes sense
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post #5 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 08:48 AM
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Hey you're not alone! I don't jump but the other day I tried to trot my mare over some poles (which she's done mannnny times in her life) but this time she decided she was gona jump a plain old pole on the ground as if they were 80cm or summat. I was NOT prepared certainly NOT for that kind of height. She even tucked her leggies in (video)! I laughed the first time as it caught me off guard (poor jab in her mouth :<) but then she jumped these invisible jumps a few more times and getting the feel of when she was gonna bundle up under for the launch got easier with each repetition. I did it with a long rein as I really didn't wanna jab her again. It was so random and any onlooker would have thought we were mad, jumping these invisible barriers, with terrible form may I add. note: it was only after I realised that its coz I'd not taken the boxes either side of the pole away, coz I'd just shoved the poles on the ground after someones jump session. It was dark, floodlit arena so bless her little soul <3

Are you not able to get a jump lesson anywhere, even just one to set you up for good practice and position?
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post #6 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 10:41 AM
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Grab the mane with both hands and don't try to anticipate when she's going to jump. By grabbing the mane, you will be pulled forward if you get left behind and you won't risk popping her in the mouth when you lose you balance.

On the flat, you can practice two point and transitioning between different positions (two point, sitting, posting, halfseat, ect). It builds balance and strength.
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post #7 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 01:39 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalraii View Post
Hey you're not alone! I don't jump but the other day I tried to trot my mare over some poles (which she's done mannnny times in her life) but this time she decided she was gona jump a plain old pole on the ground as if they were 80cm or summat. I was NOT prepared certainly NOT for that kind of height. She even tucked her leggies in (video)! I laughed the first time as it caught me off guard (poor jab in her mouth :<) but then she jumped these invisible jumps a few more times and getting the feel of when she was gonna bundle up under for the launch got easier with each repetition. I did it with a long rein as I really didn't wanna jab her again. It was so random and any onlooker would have thought we were mad, jumping these invisible barriers, with terrible form may I add. note: it was only after I realised that its coz I'd not taken the boxes either side of the pole away, coz I'd just shoved the poles on the ground after someones jump session. It was dark, floodlit arena so bless her little soul <3

Are you not able to get a jump lesson anywhere, even just one to set you up for good practice and position?

aww bless your horse she sounds so sweet!
I could go to another stables but I'm not sure if I can afford to do many lessons- and they don't tend to let you jump on your first lessons around here, not to mention I'm actually a really nervous rider on most other horses, so jumping them would probably be too out of my comfort zone honestly...

however, I had a super long hack today, and actually found a cross country field with jumps thats available for public use, I could try her there as their not high and well spaced out, its just that its over an hour away lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
Grab the mane with both hands and don't try to anticipate when she's going to jump. By grabbing the mane, you will be pulled forward if you get left behind and you won't risk popping her in the mouth when you lose you balance.

On the flat, you can practice two point and transitioning between different positions (two point, sitting, posting, halfseat, ect). It builds balance and strength.
will definatly try this, sounds smart, though she trots with her head quite low so I'm not sure if I would end up leaning forward anyway :/
will have to try it and see



@Foxhunter would also like to add I was totally wrong about the saddle, spoke to the owner and apparently its a bareback saddle, its just got a very high front and back lol
your still right of course- seen pleanty of riders jump bareback, just don't think its the most beginner friendly idea lol

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post #8 of 14 Old 04-28-2019, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UnhappyHacker View Post

will definatly try this, sounds smart, though she trots with her head quite low so I'm not sure if I would end up leaning forward anyway :/
will have to try it and see

It's not bad to be ahead of the vertical approaching a jump. You just need a solid base in your heels and legs. Just don't move at the actual fence if you approach already in front of the vertical.


You can use a neck strap or martingale if the mane doesn't work. The idea is to have something you can hold onto that will keep your hands out of their way and make you move with the horse. If you aren't going to be jumping consistently or seriously, the least you can do is learn how to stay out of their way.
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post #9 of 14 Old 04-29-2019, 03:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
It's not bad to be ahead of the vertical approaching a jump. You just need a solid base in your heels and legs. Just don't move at the actual fence if you approach already in front of the vertical.


You can use a neck strap or martingale if the mane doesn't work. The idea is to have something you can hold onto that will keep your hands out of their way and make you move with the horse. If you aren't going to be jumping consistently or seriously, the least you can do is learn how to stay out of their way.
ill ask about a neck strap, she was so sweet and really looked after me even though she was totally out of practice, so I defiantly want to make it as easy as possible, thanks
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post #10 of 14 Old 04-29-2019, 09:33 AM
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how does jumping work??

Ok, Iím following this. I donít jump either... we mostly just trail ride, but there is this little stream on the property that Chase jumps EVERY TIME. He wonít walk through the thing, and every time- even though Iím expecting it- I feel so clumsy going over it.

The first time or two I was caught off guard, and did catch him in the mouth. So then, to prevent that I now give him much looser reins coming up to it... but after landing I have no control and he likes to rush out of it so then heís trotting off as Iím trying to gather my reins. It probably sounds worse than it actually is... but I just feel so awkward doing it lol.

Iím in a western saddle too, so Iím not sure that helps since I canít really get forward without hitting the horn.

If any trail riders have advice on jumping trail obstacles without loosing your reins, hitting the horses mouth, or getting impaled with the horn - Iím all ears!


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