Pet peves. - Page 15 - The Horse Forum
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post #141 of 230 Old 11-23-2010, 10:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvetsAB View Post
I dont have the greatest leg strength in the world, but it is pretty decent. I ride lesson horses who can be pretty dead to the leg....so I ride in a small spur because otherwise I would have to kick the crap out of Bart sometimes.

It isnt always that the person is lazy...
I still don't like it.
I rode a friend's horse the other day who was refused to respond to my leg out of pure stubbornness and even though my right leg is weak I still managed to get the horse working correctly after a few minutes.

Wearing them once or two is fine in my opinion but all the time I seen as unfit.
No offence, but you know what your problem is and I hope you are trying to do something about your leg strength.

Also, people who wear them when there horse is forward enough and they still jab at them. (using spurs wrongly is a pet peeve of mine too)

In short, I dislike the use of spurs and I rarely use them.
Just what I think.
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post #142 of 230 Old 11-24-2010, 01:01 AM
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Re the spur debate. If you know have excellent control of your lower leg and can apply the spur at exactly the right moment, they are an excellent tool. It is when you see riders kicking the spur in at every stride. I prefer a dressage whip, particularly for not so experienced riders. I attended a Steffen Peters masterclass on Saturday morning, he was the top dressage rider in the world in 2009 and watching him ride, he is brilliant, so soft, so controlled and just overall beautiful. He uses spurs, shock horror! His philosophy is that you should NEVER kick the horse, if you are trying to create sensitivity and responsiveness in a horse, kicking is merely going to make them dead sided. If you do not get a reaction from a squeeze of the calf, then move to give a flick of the whip or a touch of the spur. As soon as you get the reaction, remove the pressure and sit quietly.
Spurs DO have their place, of course it's great if your horse will be sensitive off the leg from the get go, but many people don't have the luxury of training a horse from the ground up and have to deal with problems installed from previous riders, thus other methods must be employed.
It should have nothing to do with leg strength, by all means lay a kick into your horse that could break it's ribs and be proud of having that sort of strength, but it is the tactful riders that succeed and pull out genuinely beautiful performances, not the ones that lift their legs sideways and get a great big kick up.
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post #143 of 230 Old 11-24-2010, 06:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty View Post
Re the spur debate. If you know have excellent control of your lower leg and can apply the spur at exactly the right moment, they are an excellent tool. It is when you see riders kicking the spur in at every stride. I prefer a dressage whip, particularly for not so experienced riders. I attended a Steffen Peters masterclass on Saturday morning, he was the top dressage rider in the world in 2009 and watching him ride, he is brilliant, so soft, so controlled and just overall beautiful. He uses spurs, shock horror! His philosophy is that you should NEVER kick the horse, if you are trying to create sensitivity and responsiveness in a horse, kicking is merely going to make them dead sided. If you do not get a reaction from a squeeze of the calf, then move to give a flick of the whip or a touch of the spur. As soon as you get the reaction, remove the pressure and sit quietly.
Spurs DO have their place, of course it's great if your horse will be sensitive off the leg from the get go, but many people don't have the luxury of training a horse from the ground up and have to deal with problems installed from previous riders, thus other methods must be employed.
It should have nothing to do with leg strength, by all means lay a kick into your horse that could break it's ribs and be proud of having that sort of strength, but it is the tactful riders that succeed and pull out genuinely beautiful performances, not the ones that lift their legs sideways and get a great big kick up.
AMEN sister!
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post #144 of 230 Old 11-24-2010, 11:52 AM
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When people are selling their horse but they tell you what you can or can't do with the horse! if your selling the horse and the buyer is giving you money, you should have no say in what is to be done, hence your selling the horse.
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post #145 of 230 Old 11-24-2010, 12:18 PM
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Shimla....there is a whole thread somewhere about wearing or not wearing helmets if you would like to discuss it there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boldstart View Post
I still don't like it.
I rode a friend's horse the other day who was refused to respond to my leg out of pure stubbornness and even though my right leg is weak I still managed to get the horse working correctly after a few minutes.

Wearing them once or two is fine in my opinion but all the time I seen as unfit.
No offence, but you know what your problem is and I hope you are trying to do something about your leg strength.

Also, people who wear them when there horse is forward enough and they still jab at them. (using spurs wrongly is a pet peeve of mine too)

In short, I dislike the use of spurs and I rarely use them.
Just what I think.
How am I supposed to correct it when I only ride twice a month? It isnt like I am jabbing my tiny little nub of a spur (seriously, it is about 1/4 inch, if that) into Bart every step of the way. Since it is so small, I have to turn my leg in a bit more to use it, meaning that I cant use it all the time. I also dont dig it into him when I go over a jump. I can use it independantly from my leg, when I need to. I would also prefer to learn to correctly use a spur by riding a horse who only needs it occasionally, with a small spur, then have to learn on something that might need more encouragement.

There is a difference between wearing a spur and using it correctly, as a fine tuner, and using incorrectly, jabbing and poking every step of the way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty View Post
Re the spur debate. If you know have excellent control of your lower leg and can apply the spur at exactly the right moment, they are an excellent tool. ------- He uses spurs, shock horror! ------- If you do not get a reaction from a squeeze of the calf, then move to give a flick of the whip or a touch of the spur. As soon as you get the reaction, remove the pressure and sit quietly.

Spurs DO have their place, of course it's great if your horse will be sensitive off the leg from the get go, but many people don't have the luxury of training a horse from the ground up and have to deal with problems installed from previous riders, thus other methods must be employed.

It should have nothing to do with leg strength, by all means lay a kick into your horse that could break it's ribs and be proud of having that sort of strength, but it is the tactful riders that succeed and pull out genuinely beautiful performances, not the ones that lift their legs sideways and get a great big kick up.
I agree Katy. Last year I was in a clinic with Chris Delia, and a few of us who had horses who werent responding to our legs were put in a circle. To trot, we were only allowed to squeeze the horse once, then had to squeeze and apply a tap with a crop. After a few times, the horses moved off of our legs. I do this almost every lesson with the lesson horse I ride, because he has gotten to where he will ignore it, but as soon as he is reschooled for 5 minutes, he responds.
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It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows. --Epictetus
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post #146 of 230 Old 11-24-2010, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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Remember this thread isn't about debating the use of spurs!

Silver Serenade
2002 TB Gelding
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post #147 of 230 Old 11-24-2010, 10:27 PM
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People who put down people who are different...
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post #148 of 230 Old 11-27-2010, 04:13 PM
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People who get off on being judgmental of others. We all have our moments where we think "GAH, really?!!?" at someone but -- to make it a habit in order to pat yourself on the back is just a huge huge pet peeve of mine.

I understand a lot of it comes to do with lessons we are HARD taught as children or when we first start riding, going to horse camp, etc. People who think you can ONLY get up on the left side of a horse or the world will end -- as a silly example.

Just because you've heard or were taught something does not mean that anyone who does it differently is a bad person, is stupid or worthy of condemnation so you can pat yourself on the back for doing it the "right" way.



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post #149 of 230 Old 11-28-2010, 02:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck View Post
People to keep their horse in a stall 24/7.
We actually have a horse in the barn that hates turnout. As soon as you turn him out he'll just stand by the gate and kick at it, occasionally calling out until you let him in. He'll do it for hours. Someone also mentioned prejudice against horse breeds -guilty- I mean, it's natural to have aversion to certain breeds, most people do.

My pet peeves:

* People that discount TB's in the [hunter] show ring
* People that don't call lines in the schooling ring
* People that don't maintain proper horse distance or worse, stop their horse on my horse's butt
* People that think that every horse can be ridden in a snaffle. My horse great in his pelham, but if you stick a snaffle in he peaces out after the jumps.
* Starting horses undersaddle at 2 years old -- I don't care how fused their knees are, those aren't the only growth plates
* People that don't teach their horse basic flat work or teach it, but then never practice it.
* People that get overly mad on greenies/babies. They don't understand why you're now beating them...
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post #150 of 230 Old 11-28-2010, 04:02 PM
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When people use a crop without even trying to use their legs...
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