What Bad Riding Habits REALLY Bug You to See? - Page 10 - The Horse Forum
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post #91 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 02:08 PM
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What do you mean people who have multiple entry's and multiple horses in the same class? Why would that bother you? Years ago it bothers me when I knew very little about horses as a business ( I was like 10) because I said "that's not fair they have a higher change of winning" now I realize a lot of these people are trainers riding clients horses, the one horse can use it as a warm up for another class. Exposure for the horses. schooling rounds. 99% of people around here who do that (hunter and jumpers) do not go in classes to clean up its all for showing and winning is a bonus.

You would hate me at shows! But I do it to help a friend out who can't ride her horse and to show my own horse and to get show miles on another. I'm not a professional so I'm not being paid but it's not to "get the upper hand" in the class lol
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post #92 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Mckellar View Post
What do you mean people who have multiple entry's and multiple horses in the same class? Why would that bother you? Years ago it bothers me when I knew very little about horses as a business ( I was like 10) because I said "that's not fair they have a higher change of winning" now I realize a lot of these people are trainers riding clients horses, the one horse can use it as a warm up for another class. Exposure for the horses. schooling rounds. 99% of people around here who do that (hunter and jumpers) do not go in classes to clean up its all for showing and winning is a bonus.

You would hate me at shows! But I do it to help a friend out who can't ride her horse and to show my own horse and to get show miles on another. I'm not a professional so I'm not being paid but it's not to "get the upper hand" in the class lol
In 4H shows during the some classes such as halter and gaming classes, the kids who have several horses are allowed to have multiple entries, which I find very annoying. At 4H shows you can't ride horses that aren't your own, so what you mentioned doesn't happen because they have to own or lease that horse. I don't know why, it just annoys me.

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post #93 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 06:36 PM
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Riders who grip with their knees, chair seat, and most of all... yanking the horse's face off! Seriously some people need to learn what a soft hand and release is. :P
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post #94 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Joidigm View Post
Using your seat to collect the rear all the way through the spine; now how do you bring the head down? A green or retrained horse that isn't used to moving with their rear ends under them. You can drive them, make them pick up and reach under themselves better. They're still learning.
If you are riding the horse correctly, the head will come into a "set" of its own accord. That is the idea of being "on the bit" - that the horse is maintaining the frame themselves.

You don't ask the horse to drop the head. Any time you worry about where the horse's head is, you should think about what you can do to correct it from BEHIND - not from your hands.
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post #95 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by blue eyed pony View Post
He's much nicer to ride long and low than in a higher "competition" frame that's for sure... keeps rhythm better, he's straighter, he's more "in control" (he likes to get a bit rushy) AND he's more forward and more willing. Funny horse that he is :P I should get a video sometime and stick it up here to see if what I'm feeling is really what he looks like.

Edit; COMPLETELY different feeling to this, on a previous horse;

He is very much on the forehand, with no engagement and the back is hollowed behind the saddle indicating that he is stiffening the back and not swinging. Comfy to sit on, but not correct ;) It may well build up muscle over the neck, but the back will stay undeveloped and the hind quarters will not develop any strength or pushing power - which then defeats the purpose of long and low used in the sense of a dressage exercise.
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post #96 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 09:58 PM
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DoubleS : that clears it up a bit. That just seems very odd then lol, not sure the reasoning behind that. That would annoy me too
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post #97 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joidigm View Post
Using your seat to collect the rear all the way through the spine; now how do you bring the head down? A green or retrained horse that isn't used to moving with their rear ends under them. You can drive them, make them pick up and reach under themselves better. They're still learning.
Because you don't throw your reins up their necks and leave them to fend for themselves
A young dressage horse, fresh from the breakers so has no idea about collection, going into a 'frame' etc. is ridden very forward, motoring off their hind legs, into a very light, elastic contact on the bridle. The contact is essential for connecting the hind legs, to the back, to the bridle and to the riders hand.
It does not take long at all (in fact, most breakers under a good, unobstrusive rider, will be starting to stretch from the wither into the bridle within only a few rides after backing.

All we care about, is that the horse goes forward off the leg with active hind legs. He is ridden in this manner until he develops the srength to develop a little more carrying power behind, and can then begin to slightly shorten the frame. This is when the horse will start developing a good reaction to the rider's seat. The seat takes the job of the hand, in becoming the 'restraining aid' and can begin to influence the speed and carrying capactity of the hind legs.
In creating drive in the hind legs, with the 'driving aids' (riders leg), and containing this power through the seat to control the speed and carrying capactity of the hind leg, and completing the circuit with the hind, keeping a light contact with the horse's mouth - he will naturally begin to come into the typical 'frame' that you see in a dressage horse. The stronger he gets, the shorter and more uphill this 'frame' becomes. No need to pull on their mouth to pull the head down. The contact and restraining aid of the seat does the work, and saves the horse's mouth.
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post #98 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 11:22 PM
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I dislike it when people strap gadgets on their horse without at least a clue of how to use the gadget properly or how to actually try to get positive results out of it.

I'm not anti-gadget (I've given a few a go myself) but I think a person should at least have SOME NOTION of what they're doing before they just start strapping gadgets on.

* I'm often reading and posting from mobile and Siri loves to make a mockery of the English language.
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post #99 of 179 Old 06-28-2012, 11:36 PM
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I know this has been said before, but i absolutely hate seeing a horse going around in a false frame. You know the one where the rider has a death grip on the bit to haul the horses head in. And then these are inevitably the people that brag about how they taught their horse to go in frame "sooo easily!!!"
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post #100 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 01:24 AM
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I really dislike it when novice riders become know-it-alls and start acting as if they could re-invent the rules of good training, actually ruining a horses' skills and health by their incompetence, misuse of training tools and lack of skills - and not even admitting that they could actually use the help of a proper trainer!

I have come a long way, to surrender my shadow to the shadow of my horse.
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