What Bad Riding Habits REALLY Bug You to See? - Page 6 - The Horse Forum
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post #51 of 179 Old 06-26-2012, 07:04 PM
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I can't find it again to quote it, but some one mentioned pulling on the reins while applying leg pressure? This is basically collecting, in how I have been taught and explained by many instructors and riders. You're not supposed to yank the mouth and kick of course, but pulling the reins down gently and applying pressure with the legs is how many are taught to signal the horse to collect his frame. It is also used with gaited horses to help them collect their gaits to prevent them from pacing.

It's supposed to be subtle, so I assume the peeve would be over exaggerating and jerking on the horse.

Think of it not as a failure but as a success in how not to do it.

Don't look in a horses mouth for a gift.
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post #52 of 179 Old 06-26-2012, 07:19 PM
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This event -

I'm shopping for horses.
I go to see a horse.
He bites the crap out of my arm.
He doesn't let go.
I promply smack him on the nose.
He throws his head up, obviously never been repriminded.
Then the owner looks at me like I've just burned her horse with a hot iron across his face.
Seriously -.-'

That actually happened to me :p I obviously didn't buy that horse xD Got Cowboy instead. He doesn't bite

~ When I Die, Remember Me By My Horses ~
* Because They Are Responsible *
.: For Letting Me Live :. (c) xJumperx
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post #53 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 12:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
I was just going to say what Anebel said; the heel/spur in the side every stride.

Or, in the case of lunging a horse, the constant flipping of the whip and clucking nonstop, even thought the horse is already going nicely.

OMG, what the heck?? I know right...I see them all that all the time at AQHA shows! Leave them alone people! They're cantering fine and they're probably not going to stop! If you're so worried about them stopping, train them kindly to keep going until asked to stop...you can do that you know. Just stop nagging!
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post #54 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 01:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joidigm View Post
I can't find it again to quote it, but some one mentioned pulling on the reins while applying leg pressure? This is basically collecting, in how I have been taught and explained by many instructors and riders. You're not supposed to yank the mouth and kick of course, but pulling the reins down gently and applying pressure with the legs is how many are taught to signal the horse to collect his frame. It is also used with gaited horses to help them collect their gaits to prevent them from pacing.

It's supposed to be subtle, so I assume the peeve would be over exaggerating and jerking on the horse.
Collection has nothing to do with pulling the hands. You should have a horse coming forward into hands that collect the energy. This is just by staying still and not allowing the energy to escape. At no point at all should the rider's hands move backwards. Ever. That is not collection then, it is forcing the horse into a false frame.
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post #55 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 02:14 AM
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agree with chilla, if you are pulling on the reins to get a horse to collect then it isnt collecting.

when I ride my pony into my hands there is a contact down the reins but it never feels more than having a small weight on the end of a piece of cotton, It should feel light and easy and at no point should there be anything even remotly like pulling.

RIDE your horse FORWARDS and keep him STRAIGHT

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post #56 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 02:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom View Post
I received a wonderful amount of help from a much more experienced girl when I first got Brock and he showed himself to be a bag of trouble, and she said she hoped I didn't mind that some of her methods weren't all touchy-feely. I told her, not at all, because I knew that if I didn't discipline him properly I'd either have to spend a fortune in fixing him up or he'd hurt me or someone else very badly, and be off to the doggers.

People do the same thing with dogs - I've met too many out of control, aggressive dogs whose owners get upset at YOU when you yell at their dog for being aggressive.
I do agree with disciplining animals, but if someone ever yelled at my dog I'd flip. Of course, she's not allowed to show aggression towards anyone and I would correct her if she did. If someone else tried to correct her that would absolutely not be okay. She used to be slightly reactive when she was a half grown pup (she's good now) and I can say without a doubt in the world anyone yelling at her would have made it 10 times worse.

I hate when people correct other people's animals for things without being asked, or try to 'fix' a problem, it doesn't matter if the way they go about it is good or not. If they ask if I need a hand or would like some advice that's different. This goes for dogs or horses.

And it bigs me when people override their horses and are harsh on their poor mouths.
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post #57 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 02:36 AM
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srh1 if your horse bites me then it will get a smack, like it or not, if your horse is nipping then clearly it hasnt got any manners and correction has to be done instantly, not 2 mins later when youve managed to get accross the yard to discipline your horse, at that point the horse doesnt understand why it is being punished.

i've had plenty of horses bite me over a stable door as I walked past, all have got a smack, none have thought about doing it again.
My own pony occassionaly will nip at the moment (frustration at being locked in a stable on boxrest) He doesnt dare nip me but the lady who looks after him in the morning for me wont smack him so he takes advantage.

RIDE your horse FORWARDS and keep him STRAIGHT

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post #58 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 03:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srh1 View Post
I do agree with disciplining animals, but if someone ever yelled at my dog I'd flip.
The dog I was thinking of at the time was a full grown malamute (with an incompetent owner) that had chased down my 3yo sister. I think it was reasonable to yell at it and chase it off. I don't go round yelling at other people's animals, but having been badly mauled by a dog in childhood I know what they're capable of and they're not allowed in my space unless invited. Certainly not if they're being aggressive, which many big ones are in the city as they're frustrated out of their mind stuck in tiny terrace houses with no garden to speak of.
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post #59 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 04:01 AM
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Faye, if you are actually handling my horse/dog it means I am either right there to give instruction or I trust you enough to make a judgement call like that.

I've never had a horse bite me over a stall, but then I've never been close enough to a horse I didn't know and wasn't watching closely to give them the chance. If a horse actually does bite you and you were just walking by ignoring them that's your safety so it's different. If it's possible to give a horse you don't know some extra space and not get bit in the first place that seems even better though :)

Dogs are different than horses. To some dogs a person yelling at her if they already didn't like them would make them think "WOAH, I knew that person was evil, but don't worry I'll eat them!". To the type that was reacting aggressively out of fear it would also reinforce their thoughts. Even if it does stop the behavior in the moment it's not likely to help long term. Unless you or someone/something else is in actual danger just ignoring it is best for everyone involved. I've worked through the issues of both types before and the correction has to come from the owner to be helpful. And yelling from anyone is usually counterproductive.

Safety first, obviously. But if you can safely avoid contact with an animal you don't know and don't have permission to handle then do so and don't worry about what its reaction to you is.
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post #60 of 179 Old 06-27-2012, 04:02 AM
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EvilHorseofDoom I totally agree with you in that situation!

And I love your name!
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